Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home pageAstronomics discounts for Cloudy Nights members
· Get a Cloudy Nights T-Shirt · Submit a Review / Article

Click here if you are having trouble logging into the forums

Privacy Policy | Please read our Terms of Service | Signup and Troubleshooting FAQ | Problems? PM a Red or a Green Gu… uh, User

General Astronomy >> General Observing and Astronomy

Pages: 1
northernontario
Pooh-Bah
*****

Reged: 07/01/09

Loc: Porcupine, Ontario Canada
How much time? new
      #5614388 - 01/09/13 07:49 PM

I got out on Sunday.

Sunday was really nice. A bit on the cold side, but skies were great.

M33 was easily found with the 24 mm. I could see some loose structure scattered here and there in patches.

With 18 mm UWA and it all started to come together.

I also noticed some areas are dense than others. I explored around the edges, and to my right, there was a star and some fuzzy stuff below it.

I initially thought I was out of focus, but twas all good. I put in a 14mm and the star was still a star, but the fuzz remained. So I went 8.8 and had the same results.

An extra galaxy object, perhaps a dense open cluster within M33, maybe a nebula...I continued my tour around the outer edges of the galaxy. Some denser patches showed up here and there, then I went back the 24 mm, then back to the 18, then an 11 mm plossl.....

And when I finally snapped out of it, it occurred to me that I was in M33 for close to an hour.

I won't tell you how much time I spent in M42, suffice to say that in a 6 hour session, I may have hit about 15 objects. M51 and 81 and 82 really stood out as well.

An hour on M33.....seems normal to me.

jake


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Ed D
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 04/30/10

Loc: Sunny South Florida
Re: How much time? new [Re: northernontario]
      #5614453 - 01/09/13 08:21 PM

On my last dark sky outing I spent half the night on M33, so an hour doesn't seem like that long. To each his own, but Messier Marathons and hopping from one object to the next have never appealed to me.

Here's a link to the sketch of M33 I posted from that outing. Look familiar?

It takes time to see detail. You're doing great.

Ed D

Edited by Ed D (01/09/13 08:25 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Dennis_S253
Pooh-Bah


Reged: 11/22/11

Loc: West Central Florida
Re: How much time? new [Re: Ed D]
      #5614602 - 01/09/13 10:21 PM

I remember the first time I looked for M33. I was looking and looking and looking. I kept saying I got to be there. Then as I was moving the RA I could tell, yes I am here. I don't know how long I looked, but it was a while.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Tony Flanders
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 05/18/06

Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA
Re: How much time? new [Re: northernontario]
      #5615003 - 01/10/13 07:57 AM

Quote:

M33 was easily found with the 24 mm. I could see some loose structure scattered here and there in patches...

I explored around the edges, and to my right, there was a star and some fuzzy stuff below it.




Congratulations; you have "discovered" NGC 604, one of the brightest emission nebulae known anywhere in the universe.

Edited by Tony Flanders (01/10/13 09:14 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
kenrenard
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 12/13/12

Loc: Dunmore, PA
Re: How much time? new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5615066 - 01/10/13 08:52 AM

I tried for M33 first time on Saturday night. Some clouds rolling in with my 8 inch dob and had no luck. I did some reading about its low surface brightness and decided to try with binoculars on Tuesday. I got it a bit dim but I saw it. Now that I know what to look for I can spend more time studying it.

As a beginner I was happy to find it. I just need more time and clear skies. I found out I'm in a red zone which doesn't help. My observation was made in a yellow zone which to me seems like very very dark skies.


Ed D I do like your sketch.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
northernontario
Pooh-Bah
*****

Reged: 07/01/09

Loc: Porcupine, Ontario Canada
Re: How much time? new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5618604 - 01/12/13 08:37 AM

Quote:

Quote:

M33 was easily found with the 24 mm. I could see some loose structure scattered here and there in patches...

I explored around the edges, and to my right, there was a star and some fuzzy stuff below it.




Congratulations; you have "discovered" NGC 604, one of the brightest emission nebulae known anywhere in the universe.




Thank you for identifying this one Tony.

It is amazing to see an object with in an object.

The following evening I spent a great deal of time on the Andromeda Galaxy. I heard there are globulars that can be seen with in the galaxy.

I did not spot them. But I wasn't sure where to look.

jake


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Tony Flanders
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 05/18/06

Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA
Re: How much time? [Re: northernontario]
      #5618629 - 01/12/13 09:06 AM

Quote:

The following evening I spent a great deal of time on the Andromeda Galaxy. I heard there are globulars that can be seen with in the galaxy.

I did not spot them. But I wasn't sure where to look.




You have essentially no chance of spotting them without a detailed chart. G1, the brightest and biggest, does indeed look quite obviously non-stellar at 200X in a big scope. However, it's fully 2.5 degrees from M31's core, and nowhere near the visible disk.

The most obvious target within M31 for big scope under dark skies is the magnificent star cloud NGC 206. Look for it right about where the two main dust lanes intersect the main axis of the galaxy.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Bill Weir
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 06/01/04

Loc: Metchosin (Victoria), Canada
Re: How much time? new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5619247 - 01/12/13 03:09 PM

So you want to find G 1, like Tony said you need a good chart. Here is a good source for all objects within M31.
http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/ANDROMEDA_Atlas/frames.html

G 1 is well outside the standardly observed galaxy. Here is a widefield finder chart. Take note of where M32 is and the bright star 32 Andromedae and that asterism around it. These for me are the key starting points for the star hop to G 1. Five degree width to this FOV.
http://www.nightskyinfo.com/archive/g1_globular_cluster/g1_map.gif

And here is the more closeup finder chart for once you are in the area. One degree width to the FOV. Stars to 14th mag
http://www.nightskyinfo.com/archive/g1_globular_cluster/g1_detailed_map.gif

This is an object that requires higher magnification. I've seen it for sure with my 6" scope at 240X as a small disc with two points of stars on it's edge. Mickey Mouse is the term many use to describe it. Here is a good shot of how it should look.
http://www.astrosurf.com/jwisn/g1.htm

Good luck. With your 16" it should be a snap.

Bill


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1


Extra information
4 registered and 11 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  cildarith, panhard, tecmage 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 828

Jump to

CN Forums Home


Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics