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Brian Albin
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Reged: 08/22/06

Loc: Western Oregon
Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes?
      #5620186 - 01/13/13 04:55 AM

When we say light scattered by curved support vanes is splashed across the image, where does it go?
Does light from a single star wash over the entire field, or does the light spread only around the star, and only as far outward from the star as the rays of a straight vane would have been imaged?


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MKV
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Reged: 01/20/11

Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Brian Albin]
      #5620235 - 01/13/13 07:15 AM

Read more about it here.

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Atl
professor emeritus
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Reged: 04/13/12

Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: MKV]
      #5620373 - 01/13/13 09:43 AM

Instead of large spikes you get a smaller light blur around the object. Diffraction is still noticeable, but with very small objects in the glare of a large one like some double stars it can lessen the glare making the smaller companion more obvious. On large objects like Jupiter it works but doesn't seem to have an advantage. Last night using one I was able to view the trapezium in M42 and see black space around e and f. In the past I sort of had to look for them closely.

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Asbytec
Guy in a furry hat
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Reged: 08/08/07

Loc: La Union, PI
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: MKV]
      #5620386 - 01/13/13 09:49 AM

And here...at bottom.
http://www.telescope-optics.net/spider.htm

"Diffraction effect of a curved vane can be illustrated by breaking it into a number of smaller, practically straight sections, with varying orientations (FIG. 110a). While the total amount of energy produced by a curved vane is identical to that of a straight vane of equal length and thickness, it is spread out wide, making it practically invisible (it still lowers the contrast the same, on average)."


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Jarad
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Reged: 04/28/03

Loc: Atlanta, GA
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Asbytec]
      #5625911 - 01/16/13 10:11 AM

On bright objects, instead of seeing 4 individual bright spikes, you see a dim surrounding glow. It makes something like Jupiter look like there is a bit of atmospheric haze scattering light around it.

Jarad


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Atl
professor emeritus
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Reged: 04/13/12

Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Jarad]
      #5626448 - 01/16/13 03:57 PM

One important thing with curved vanes I have learned. The arc of the curve must be 180 degrees. With one vane a full 180 degree arc must be created, with 2 vanes each must be 90 degrees, with three vanes each vane must be 60 degrees, and with a 4 vane 45 degrees for each vane. If all of the curves in the spiders light path do not come to 180 degrees the diffraction effect will not occur. If you exceed 180 degrees the diffraction will overlap creating unwanted effects that can have a detrimental effect on viewing. The more vanes the spider has the less curve it needs for each, but there is also more diffraction with more vanes.

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Jarad
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Reged: 04/28/03

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Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Atl]
      #5627858 - 01/17/13 11:16 AM

In a straight spider, each vane produces two spikes that stick out from opposite sides of the star. In a curved spider, each vane produces two fans that stick out from opposite sides of the star. The angle of the fans equals the curvature of the vane. So if they add up to 180 degrees, the fans spread out and "connect", making an even surrounding glow in a full circle. If they add up to less than 180 degrees, there will be dark gaps between the fans. If they add up to more than 180 degrees, there will be lighter stripes where 2 fans overlap.

Jarad


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Brian Albin
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Reged: 08/22/06

Loc: Western Oregon
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Jarad]
      #5628193 - 01/17/13 02:29 PM

It sounds like the light stays with the star, and does not spill all over the picture.

Thank you all for the answers.


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careysub
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Reged: 02/18/11

Loc: Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Atl]
      #5628260 - 01/17/13 03:06 PM

Might the requirement really be that the arcs must be circular arcs, that add up to an even multiple of 180 degrees?

The 360 degree secondary produces diffraction that is not noticeable, same with a vignetting aperture. Don Pensack recommends a curved support design using two 180 degree arc supports.


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Thomas Karpf
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Reged: 02/09/09

Loc: Newington, CT
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Brian Albin]
      #5628347 - 01/17/13 03:45 PM

Quote:

It sounds like the light stays with the star, and does not spill all over the picture.




Not really. No more so than the light from the normal four diffraction spikes stays with the star. Take those four diffraction spikes and smear them around the star and that's the effect. Because there's more total length in the vanes when you use curved vanes, you smear MORE light from the star into the bajillion spikes you get from the curved vanes.


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Thomas Karpf
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Reged: 02/09/09

Loc: Newington, CT
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: careysub]
      #5628354 - 01/17/13 03:47 PM

Quote:

Might the requirement really be that the arcs must be circular arcs, that add up to an even multiple of 180 degrees?




You could certainly look at it that way, although I don't know why you would want more than 360 total. That would be like using two comnplete circles to hold the secondary rather than two semi-circles. You could use LESS than 360 degrees, but then each star would look like a 'snow angel' with wings on opposite sides.


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careysub
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Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Thomas Karpf]
      #5628393 - 01/17/13 04:13 PM

Quote:

That would be like using two comnplete circles to hold the secondary rather than two semi-circles.




That is in fact a design I have been considering.


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mark cowan
Vendor (Veritas Optics)
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Reged: 06/03/05

Loc: salem, OR
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Brian Albin]
      #5628397 - 01/17/13 04:15 PM

Quote:

It sounds like the light stays with the star, and does not spill all over the picture.




No, quite the opposite. It spills everywhere around the star, but because it's so uniform (spikeless) you just don't recognize it easily. It's a bargain with the devil.

Best,
Mark


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careysub
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Reged: 02/18/11

Loc: Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: mark cowan]
      #5628463 - 01/17/13 04:55 PM

Quote:

Quote:

It sounds like the light stays with the star, and does not spill all over the picture.




No, quite the opposite. It spills everywhere around the star, but because it's so uniform (spikeless) you just don't recognize it easily. It's a bargain with the devil.

Best,
Mark




If you can't see it, how big a devil can it be?


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Sean Cunneen
Let Me Think
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Reged: 08/01/07

Loc: Blue Island Illinois
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: mark cowan]
      #5628478 - 01/17/13 05:07 PM

I thought curved spiders were THE thing until I noticed the light-fog, after that I switched to 4 vane and never went back. Some targets(my favorites)like Jupiter and at the time, Mars, can be very distracting but I think curved vanes do help on dim diffuse objects, like planetary nebula and structure in galaxies.

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Brian Albin
Seeker


Reged: 08/22/06

Loc: Western Oregon
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Sean Cunneen]
      #5629841 - 01/18/13 12:10 PM

I think I might like combination vanes - curved out where the energy is slight near the perimeter of the telescope tube, and straight in next to the mirror to avoid enlarging the apparent diameter of the star.

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Jarad
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Reged: 04/28/03

Loc: Atlanta, GA
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: Brian Albin]
      #5630044 - 01/18/13 02:50 PM

I'm not sure it quite works that way - the transformation isnt' linear, it's a fourier transform. I think what you are describing would produce a spike with a faint fan.

Test the shapes you are considering by taping a cutout of the shape in front a small refractor, and see how it looks.

Jarad


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mark cowan
Vendor (Veritas Optics)
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Reged: 06/03/05

Loc: salem, OR
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: careysub]
      #5630132 - 01/18/13 03:40 PM

Quote:

If you can't see it, how big a devil can it be?




It's not whether you can see it, it's what you can't see because of it.

It obscures detail by lowering contrast. A rough analogy - I have 20/10 vision in my left eye, and at my last checkup it shows no astigmatism either, just undercorrection (I'm near sighted). Now what I can see with that eye, compared to what I could see with "ordinary" vision, is significant. Suppose I just defocus the scope a bit everytime I use it, and get used to that. Maybe after a while I wouldn't "see" it anymore. But neither would I see as well or as much as I could see if the focus were perfect.

Anything that reduces contrast transfer reduces ultimate detail. Why would I want to install a permanent defocus on my scope? Same with any other device that reduces contrast...

Best,
Mark


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careysub
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Loc: Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: mark cowan]
      #5630211 - 01/18/13 04:22 PM

Quote:

Quote:

If you can't see it, how big a devil can it be?




It's not whether you can see it, it's what you can't see because of it.

It obscures detail by lowering contrast. A rough analogy - I have 20/10 vision in my left eye, and at my last checkup it shows no astigmatism either, just undercorrection (I'm near sighted). Now what I can see with that eye, compared to what I could see with "ordinary" vision, is significant. Suppose I just defocus the scope a bit everytime I use it, and get used to that. Maybe after a while I wouldn't "see" it anymore. But neither would I see as well or as much as I could see if the focus were perfect.

Anything that reduces contrast transfer reduces ultimate detail. Why would I want to install a permanent defocus on my scope? Same with any other device that reduces contrast...

Best,
Mark




But here is the question - is the amount of diffraction light added enough to actually obscure detail that you would otherwise able to see? There is always some amount of contrast reduction so small that the human optical system cannot perceive it.

Everything in engineering involves trade-offs.

People are pretty comfortable with the fact that an illumination drop off of less than 30% at the edge of the visual field cannot be seen, and so do not demand full illumination across it.

And there is the old argument about central obstruction - any at all reduces contrast to some degree, and the bigger the greater this contrast reduction is. But there are very well respected experts (Suiter et al) who contend that this contrast reduction is genuinely negligible if not much more than 20%.

If a curved vane is the equivalent of going from a 20% CO to a 21% CO*, and the 21% CO is normally judged acceptable, why would the vanes decision not be similarly judged?

*A relative 0.21 CO with 4 vanes having a 0.0015 thickness, and a 0.20 CO with vanes that have a profile 2.4 times larger, for example.


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idp
sage


Reged: 08/21/09

Loc: New Haven, CT
Re: Where does Light Scatter from Curved Vanes? new [Re: mark cowan]
      #5630218 - 01/18/13 04:27 PM

Shouldn't curved vanes be thicker too, everything else being equal? Straight vanes work under tension, I cut mines from a tin can; they are razor-thin and perform well. No way I could made curved vanes with them, I'd have to use something thicker (which scatters more light).


Ivano

Edited by idp (01/18/13 04:30 PM)


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