Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home pageAstronomics discounts for Cloudy Nights members
· Get a Cloudy Nights T-Shirt · Submit a Review / Article

Click here if you are having trouble logging into the forums

Privacy Policy | Please read our Terms of Service | Signup and Troubleshooting FAQ | Problems? PM a Red or a Green Gu… uh, User

Observing >> Deep Sky Observing

Pages: 1
drbyyz
sage
**

Reged: 11/04/12

NGC2467, a happy accident
      #5723281 - 03/10/13 12:56 AM

Had our club's monthly observing session and I thought I'd share a little report. First, I've been trying to be more descriptive in my observing logs...you know, better than "faint fuzzy dim oval circle thing." So for M93 I came up with "2 hands holding a martini glass." I thought this was a pretty funny/accurate description so I decided to tell a fellow observer and get his thoughts on it.

Star hopping back to M93 to show him, I took a wrong turn at Asmidiske and went in the opposite direction. However, while sweeping the area I came across a faint fuzzy that I didn't remember from my H400 sweep of Puppis at the start of the evening. (As a side note, identifying open clusters in this region is almost maddening! There are sooo many and they barely stand out from the very rich background, easy to get lost but a gorgeous view to just poke around) Anyway, pulled out the Pocket Sky Atlas, realized my mistake and identified the nebula we were looking at. NGC2467. It is marked in the PSA, but I had overlooked it in past trips through Puppis.

It's a very nice "little" nebula. At first glance it appears as a fog around an 8th magnitude star which stands out pretty well in the FOV. Very similar to the look of a dewed up eyepiece or mirror/glass. That was my first impression, but I immediately noticed that none of the other stars had any haze around them. After studying it for a bit I noticed that the haze, while almost exactly circular in shape, was not centered on the star, more was to the west of the star than to the east. It appeared to be of fairly constant brightness over the entire nebula with some patchy spots here and there that were a bit darker.

A happy accident for sure. Check this one out if you haven't yet, and be sure to look up some pictures online, it makes for great images. I probably would have missed out on this one for awhile had I not taken that wrong turn.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Achernar
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 02/25/06

Loc: Mobile, Alabama, USA
Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: drbyyz]
      #5723625 - 03/10/13 10:33 AM

NGC-2467 is indeed a nice nebula, through a 15-inch it shows a lot of detail even though it's low in the sky from the U.S. I have found it easily with a 6-inch. Even from my badly light polluted driveway, with an O-III filter I can see it from western Mobile Ala.

Taras


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
drbyyz
sage
**

Reged: 11/04/12

Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: Achernar]
      #5723969 - 03/10/13 01:59 PM

I would imagine a 15" would show nice detail , as the 8" in less than great teansparency was showing a touch. I'll have to remember to come back to this one in a better night.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Madratter
Post Laureate


Reged: 01/14/13

Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: drbyyz]
      #5724529 - 03/10/13 07:11 PM

I need to re-observe this one. It has been quite a while since I looked at it. My notes with an 8" SCT. "Round nebula easily located with help of SAO atlas. Fairly easy. P Filter [Skyglow Filter] definitely improves contrast. Embedded in faint matrix of stars (8 seen at 170x). with 1 brighter one. Reminds me of Owl Nebula but not quite as bright. Stars are from open cluster Haffner 18. [Actually Haffner 18 is superimposed but this object is a combination of open cluster and nebula.]"

Edited by Madratter (03/10/13 07:12 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
drbyyz
sage
**

Reged: 11/04/12

Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: Madratter]
      #5726371 - 03/11/13 05:13 PM

Quote:

I need to re-observe this one. It has been quite a while since I looked at it. My notes with an 8" SCT. "Round nebula easily located with help of SAO atlas. Fairly easy. P Filter [Skyglow Filter] definitely improves contrast. Embedded in faint matrix of stars (8 seen at 170x). with 1 brighter one. Reminds me of Owl Nebula but not quite as bright. Stars are from open cluster Haffner 18. [Actually Haffner 18 is superimposed but this object is a combination of open cluster and nebula.]"




Interesting info about the Haffner cluster, Thanks!


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
WeltevredenKaroo
super member
*****

Reged: 03/05/12

Loc: 31°51'09" S 24°25'47" E
Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: drbyyz]
      #5729008 - 03/12/13 09:11 PM Attachment (43 downloads)

Tonight I had almost exactly the same experience as the OP, chancing onto 2467 by accident while looking for something else. First sight of it affected me the same way seeing NGC 2477 for the first time (also in Puppis) did: 'What the dickens is THAT!'? Here in the Southern mid-latitudes 2467 is nearly overhead at astro twilight. In my 180 and 200mm apertures it resembles a faint Class X - XII globular like NGC 5466 in Böotes or 5897 in Libra. Add an Ultra Block and the nebular glow dominates the starburst effect. Then as one gazes patiently longer and deeper, the nebular complex reveals itself to be very complicated. The nebulosity turns alternately mottled, streaky, and patchy as one scans back and forth repeatedly using different exit pupil sizes and fovs. Wiki has a succinct summary of 2467's life story and physical evolution, well worth the reading—especially the annotated image found in the Footnotes. This image showcases various regions as they progress through infant starform stage, starburst, gas expulsion and pillar erosion, and finally cleared-out stand-alone O and B associations shining brightly as classic young clusters entering the long dwindle into the galactic continuum. The reference papers at the bottom of the Wiki article also are worth following up. =Dana, South Africa

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Feidb
Pooh-Bah


Reged: 10/09/09

Loc: Nevada
Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: WeltevredenKaroo]
      #5729094 - 03/12/13 09:47 PM

On Feb 17, 2007 from the pulloff at the 21 mile marker on the North Shore Road at Lake Mead, NV, I was using my home-built 16-inch f/6.4 at 70X. It was a white milky glow behind some bright stars. Nice.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Dave MitskyModerator
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 04/08/02

Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth
Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: drbyyz]
      #5730196 - 03/13/13 12:05 PM Attachment (8 downloads)

NGC 2467 is a very impressive target through large apertures. I had the opportunity to observe it from the Chiefland Astronomy Village in Florida just over three years ago using "The Beast", Tom Clark's 42" f/4 Dob. I'd never before had a view of NGC 2467 quite like the one through the 42". The nebulosity associated with this young, seventh-magnitude open cluster was very prominent.

I also viewed NGC 2467 and many other great southern deep-sky objects through my friend Tony Donnangelo's 20" f/4.3 Starmaster Skytracker Dob and my 12.5" f/4.8 Starsplitter Dob during our stay at Chiefland.

http://spider.seds.org/ngc/ngc.cgi?NGC2467

http://jthommes.com/Astro/NGC2467.htm

http://www.ngcicproject.org/pubdb.htm

Dave Mitsky


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Crossen
super member
*****

Reged: 07/14/08

Loc: Vienna
Re: NGC2467, a happy accident new [Re: Dave Mitsky]
      #5757535 - 03/26/13 06:22 AM

An excellent article on NGC 2467 and its region was published in the August 1976 "Sky & Telescope" (pages 104-107). Its title is "Penetrating Puppis" and it was written by the working astrophysicists M. Pim Fitzgerald and A. F. J. Moffat. It has extremely informative charts that show our Galaxy's spiral structure out in that direction and HR diagrams of two of the very young open clusters in the NGC 2467 field. Though it was published nearly 40 years ago, the information in this article is not out of date. I think it is one of the best articles Sky & Tel has ever published because the authors so well coordinate the astrophysics of NGC 2467 and its field with what can be seen in amateur telescopes.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1


Extra information
3 registered and 7 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  Dave Mitsky, Phillip Creed, okieav8r 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 706

Jump to

CN Forums Home


Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics