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Equipment Discussions >> Eyepieces

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azure1961p
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5747340 - 03/21/13 11:05 AM

As a condo dweller id agree.

Pete


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WStewart
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/02/05

Loc: Dallas, TX
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5747355 - 03/21/13 11:11 AM

As an apartment dweller I'd also agree. No privacy whatsoever.

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Sarkikos
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Suburban Maryland, USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: WStewart]
      #5747383 - 03/21/13 11:21 AM

Observers with a nice back yard or at least a sturdy upper deck don't know how lucky they are.

Mike


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azure1961p
Postmaster
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Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5747539 - 03/21/13 12:41 PM

And some of the dumb looks I get. One neighbor is a fan and loves to look through my scope. The others ... It's weird - they balk and say nothing.
The treasure of solitude is lost in condo observing. I'd imagine just as so with apartment dwellings.

Pete


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tomharri
sage
*****

Reged: 09/19/08

Loc: USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: azure1961p]
      #5747597 - 03/21/13 01:05 PM Attachment (15 downloads)

Wear appropriate eye protection before attempting:

Edited by tomharri (03/21/13 02:07 PM)


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hfjacinto
I think he's got it!
*****

Reged: 01/12/09

Loc: Land of clouds and LP
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: tomharri]
      #5747604 - 03/21/13 01:08 PM

Mike,

This filter is on my list. I read that it makes a difference but is the difference that much noticeable? Or is it just a little difference? If you could clarify that would be great.


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Sarkikos
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Suburban Maryland, USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: hfjacinto]
      #5747675 - 03/21/13 01:48 PM

Which filter? The new TV Planet Filter? I don't have that one yet. My favorite filter for Jupiter is the Baader Moon & Sky Glow. I'd like to see a comparo between the M&SG and the new TV Planet Filter when observing Jupiter.

Maybe you meant the "nice backyard" filter? I would give up all my other filters and most of my telescopes and eyepieces for that filter!


Mike


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Starman1
Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)
*****

Reged: 06/24/03

Loc: Los Angeles
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5748270 - 03/21/13 06:43 PM

Mike,
Be careful what you wish for.
I regularly observe in 2 places: the SoCal desert, with flat horizons all around, and the high-altitude SoCal mountains, where the observing site is surrounded by tall lodge-pole pines that block off the sky up about 20 degrees from the horizon.
Even though the sky is a little darker (couple tenths of a mag.) in the desert, the sky is more impressive in the mountains, both because the high altitude makes the sky more transparent below 45 degrees altitude, and because the horizon lightening of the sky is blocked off. Blocking off the horizon-20 or 30 degrees altitude is a good thing, I've found.
Plus, it keeps me from being tempted to observe down in the muck.

Now, admittedly, if you've lost half the sky, that's no good. But losing the sky from 30 degrees down isn't so bad.


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faackanders2
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 03/28/11

Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Starman1]
      #5748493 - 03/21/13 08:53 PM

Quote:

Mike,
Be careful what you wish for.
I regularly observe in 2 places: the SoCal desert, with flat horizons all around, and the high-altitude SoCal mountains, where the observing site is surrounded by tall lodge-pole pines that block off the sky up about 20 degrees from the horizon.
Even though the sky is a little darker (couple tenths of a mag.) in the desert, the sky is more impressive in the mountains, both because the high altitude makes the sky more transparent below 45 degrees altitude, and because the horizon lightening of the sky is blocked off. Blocking off the horizon-20 or 30 degrees altitude is a good thing, I've found.
Plus, it keeps me from being tempted to observe down in the muck.

Now, admittedly, if you've lost half the sky, that's no good. But losing the sky from 30 degrees down isn't so bad.




I have observed from NC's outer banks from two locations. One was down on the ground in the shade where I could not see the horizon, but almost all ground lights were blocked - very dark skies. The other up on a 3rd floor deck with 360 horizons mostly to the ocean or bay, but I had light polution from all the ground lights in the town, plus the bright towers/lighthouses far away. Alot harder to get dark adapted above all the lights.

Observing was good at both locations, but I believe I could see dimmer stuff when I was on the ground in the dark shadows


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Scanning4Comets
Markus
*****

Reged: 12/26/04

Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5748772 - 03/21/13 11:35 PM Attachment (6 downloads)

Quote:

Wear appropriate eye protection before attempting:






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azure1961p
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: tomharri]
      #5748911 - 03/22/13 01:06 AM

Quote:

Wear appropriate eye protection before attempting:




If you ever come to CT Im wearing more than eye protection.

I can't believe you did that.

Wow.

What a way to end my day - a cross between a chuckle, guffaw and dismayed disbelief and again a chuckle.

Ok so you weren't completely satisfied with these.

Pete


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Starman1
Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)
*****

Reged: 06/24/03

Loc: Los Angeles
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: azure1961p]
      #5748949 - 03/22/13 01:37 AM

Harsh critic!

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Scanning4Comets
Markus
*****

Reged: 12/26/04

Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Starman1]
      #5749027 - 03/22/13 03:50 AM

That Lumicon O-III took 8 blows to destroy using a crescent wrench !!! Pretty tough filters! There was a very good reason for it's demise.

So folks.....now you know that dropping one of these on your carpet will do nothing to it. LOL!!!


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azure1961p
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Scanning4Comets]
      #5749143 - 03/22/13 07:30 AM

You know, there are people starving in the world who want eyepieces.

Wasteful.

Pete

Edited by azure1961p (03/22/13 07:32 AM)


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Sarkikos
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Suburban Maryland, USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: azure1961p]
      #5749177 - 03/22/13 08:09 AM

I'm willing my eyepiece collection to the starving throngs of Freedonia.

Mike


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Sarkikos
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Suburban Maryland, USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Starman1]
      #5749219 - 03/22/13 08:50 AM

Don,

Quote:

Be careful what you wish for.
I regularly observe in 2 places: the SoCal desert, with flat horizons all around, and the high-altitude SoCal mountains, where the observing site is surrounded by tall lodge-pole pines that block off the sky up about 20 degrees from the horizon.
Even though the sky is a little darker (couple tenths of a mag.) in the desert, the sky is more impressive in the mountains, both because the high altitude makes the sky more transparent below 45 degrees altitude, and because the horizon lightening of the sky is blocked off. Blocking off the horizon-20 or 30 degrees altitude is a good thing, I've found.
Plus, it keeps me from being tempted to observe down in the muck.

Now, admittedly, if you've lost half the sky, that's no good. But losing the sky from 30 degrees down isn't so bad.




I think we may be talking apples and oranges here. I mostly observe planets and the Moon at home. So light domes and light pollution in general are of no consequence. Actually, brighter ambient light can cause the eye to adapt closer to photopic and improve the perceived image of planets. Dark adaptation - mesopic rather than scotopic for bright planets - is not a good thing.

But I live in a condo with no back yard and not even a deck I can observe from. I have to schlep my scope and equipment either beside my building or 500' to a hill beyond a pond. At both sites - depending on which way I'm turned and which neighbors have their outdoor lights on - there is light glaring into my eyes. That is NOT a good thing, even when observing planets / lunar. So I would welcome a nice backyard with fences to shield my eyes from the glaring light of the scotophobes in my neighborhood. There is also the problem of lack of privacy. Those who have never lived in a condo, townhouse or apartment have probably not experienced what I'm talking about.

Deep sky observation is not the same. For deep sky, I go to two dark sites within a couple miles of each other in a yellow zone. We are allowed to use one in the winter, the other in the warmer months. But even for deep sky, I might have some radical views about horizons. Of course, those views make sense to me.

The winter dark site has lower horizons, which allow observing deeper into the southern sky but also exposes the eye to more of the light domes. Some of us prefer the warm-weather site because the horizons are higher, covered by surrounding trees, which hide more of the light domes.

But I really like the lower horizons of the winter site because I like to see how low I can go to pick up southern objects. I was able to catch Omega Centauri last month here at latitude 39 degrees when it appeared between some trees on the low southern horizon. That would have been impossible at the warm-weather site with its higher tree cover all around.

My scope is a solid-tube 10" Dob, completely flocked and baffled. I have one of the Dark Skies Apparel hooded vests. If I want to see something really faint, I just throw the hood over my head and observe like that for awhile. Working this way, I was able to tease out the Horsehead a couple months ago at the winter site, despite the low horizons and exposed light domes.

My bottom line is that for deep sky I'd rather have low horizons, light domes and all. You can always make your own shadows by baffling your scope and throwing a hoodie over your head.

Mike


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jrbarnett
Eyepiece Hooligan
*****

Reged: 02/28/06

Loc: Petaluma, CA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: tomharri]
      #5749309 - 03/22/13 09:46 AM

That Omegon 6mm is actually just a Long Perng Plossl lens stack in a custom housing. Astro-Tech and Sterling Plossls are the same optically. 4-element, 55-degree AFOV.

- Jim


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Pkgastro
member


Reged: 12/27/12

Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: jrbarnett]
      #5749405 - 03/22/13 10:29 AM

Heres a good broken filter story! Got a Lunt wedge , got excited put a 150$ nd on the front of the wedge instead of the Ep , and three minutes into observing the Sun Sashed that filter in half! Moral of story, don't let the Universe get you so excited you forget self!!!!!!!!!!!

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Starman1
Vendor (EyepiecesEtc.com)
*****

Reged: 06/24/03

Loc: Los Angeles
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5749457 - 03/22/13 11:04 AM

Mike,

I lived in a condo for a decade or so, and an apartment building for a decade before that. In both cases, the roof was accessible through a stairway and a call to the person who lived directly under the roof allayed any fears of burglars and often got me a companion to observe with.

Of course, being in LA, those roofs were flat and it was easy to set up a scope. In parts of the country where the roofs are pitched substantially, that wouldn't be possible.


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Sarkikos
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Suburban Maryland, USA
Re: TV Planet Filter new [Re: Starman1]
      #5749514 - 03/22/13 11:43 AM

I've never lived in any building that has access to the roof. And yes, in any case, all those roofs were gabled, to prevent accumulation of snow and ice. That song "Up On the Roof" never made any sense to me in my experience.

In condos and apartments where I've lived, you have to take your telescope out to a public area on the ground or bring it out your deck, if you're lucky enough to have one. Nowadays, I bet there are more and more amateur astronomers that share my situation.

Mike


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