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PhilCo126
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Reged: 01/14/05

Loc: coastline of Belgium
Furthest object in the solar system ?
      #5777551 - 04/04/13 12:21 PM

Which TransNeptunian Object (TNO) is considered the furthest object in the solar system...
Is it 1000 Km large 90377 Sedna (518 AU with orbital period of 12000 years)... or rather the 150 Km large (small) 2006 SQ372 (1500 AU with orbital period of 22500 years)


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Mister T
Pooh-Bah


Reged: 02/01/08

Loc: Upstate NY
Re: Furthest object in the solar system ? new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5777656 - 04/04/13 01:02 PM

last I checked 1500>518.

but that may not account for expansion, Dark matter, Dark energy, relativistic effects, String theory, redshift, Monopoles, black holes, planet X or global climate change.



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GlennLeDrew
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Reged: 06/18/08

Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Re: Furthest object in the solar system ? new [Re: Mister T]
      #5778940 - 04/05/13 02:46 AM

The body having the longer orbital period has (or should have?) the larger orbit semi-major axis. I believe that would qualify it as being on average the more distant.

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PhilCo126
Post Laureate


Reged: 01/14/05

Loc: coastline of Belgium
Re: Furthest object in the solar system ? new [Re: GlennLeDrew]
      #5779259 - 04/05/13 10:00 AM

Indeed, we're discussing this in the astro-club

Furthermore, it looks like 2006 SQ372 comes closer to the Sun (perihelion 24.2 AU) while 90377 Sedna only comes as close as 76.4 AU... Interesting though, Sedna will reach perihelion in the year 2075 !


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llanitedave
Humble Megalomaniac
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Reged: 09/26/05

Loc: Amargosa Valley, NV, USA
Re: Furthest object in the solar system ? new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5779544 - 04/05/13 12:37 PM

So are we judging by semi-major axis distance or aphelion distance?

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ILikePluto
member


Reged: 02/17/09

Re: Furthest object in the solar system ? new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5779577 - 04/05/13 12:46 PM

Eris is the farthest object ever seen in situ. It's currently about 97 AU from the Sun. At the time of its discovery, in 2005, Eris was claimed to be larger than Pluto, but the latest data indicate Eris is smaller than had been thought: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v478/n7370/full/nature10550.html . Either Pluto or Eris is the largest known object in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt

Sedna, which is considerably smaller--not even as big as Pluto's largest moon--is currently closer to the Sun than Eris is, but Sedna goes out much farther than Eris does.

In this list and also this list, the column headed q gives the perihelion distance, the column headed Q gives the aphelion distance, and the column headed a gives the semimajor axis, which is just the average of q and Q.

The orbital period in years can be calculated by multiplying a by the square root of a. For example, an object that has a semimajor axis of 100 AU takes 100 x 10 = 1,000 years to orbit the Sun.

Finally, many comets venture much farther from the Sun than any of the objects on these lists. The Oort cloud may stretch halfway to Alpha Centauri.

Edited by ILikePluto (04/05/13 12:48 PM)


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GlennLeDrew
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Reged: 06/18/08

Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Re: Furthest object in the solar system ? new [Re: ILikePluto]
      #5780843 - 04/05/13 11:02 PM

Indeed, the Oort Cloud, if it resulted from the 'stirring up' of the icy bodies by (primarily) the giant planets soon after the solar system's formation, could well be expected to extend to the Sun's tidal limit, which is perhaps one parsec, if memory serves.

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