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mitaccio
professor emeritus
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Reged: 03/17/09

Loc: Oahu, Hawaii
Companion to Polaris? new
      #5794227 - 04/12/13 11:33 AM

Okay, I should know this, but I don't. Last night I was at a darkish site (approx. 5.1 mag visual) working on the collimation of my scope. I was at 245x when I noted a star next to Polaris. Now I know about HIP 7283, but I was at too high of magnification for that to be in my FOV. Using Stellarium and the oculars tool, I can only suspect this star to have been mag 11.

So now my question: When using Polaris to collimate at high magnification, have others been seeing this star, and has it caused any issues with getting a perfect collimation?


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jrbarnett
Eyepiece Hooligan
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Reged: 02/28/06

Loc: Petaluma, CA
Re: Companion to Polaris? new [Re: mitaccio]
      #5794243 - 04/12/13 11:39 AM

Polaris is a trinary system with Polaris A, Polaris B and Polaris Ab (or P).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Polaris_alpha_ursae_minoris.jpg

But Ab is a dwarf and likely not a visual object in any Earth based scope as it took Hubble to image it for the first time in 2006.

So what you have is a mystery, which is great fun.

Regards,

Jim

Edited by jrbarnett (04/12/13 11:40 AM)


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Tony Flanders
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Reged: 05/18/06

Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA
Re: Companion to Polaris? [Re: mitaccio]
      #5794371 - 04/12/13 12:46 PM

Quote:

I was at 245x when I noted a star next to Polaris.




Yes, Polaris is a well-known double. The companion is magnitude 9.1, 18.6" from the primary. It's an easy split at 100X in any decent telescope when the seeing is good. But the secondary is so much fainter than the primary that it's easy to overlook. It's far too faint to interfere with star-testing.


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Jim_Smith
super member
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Reged: 11/16/12

Re: Companion to Polaris? new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5794443 - 04/12/13 01:20 PM

Collimating celestron c6 sc at 500+ the secondary sits right on a diffraction ring! Little round ball!

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mitaccio
professor emeritus
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Reged: 03/17/09

Loc: Oahu, Hawaii
Re: Companion to Polaris? new [Re: Jim_Smith]
      #5795331 - 04/12/13 08:26 PM

Yeah, most likely was looking at Polaris B. Thanks.

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jrbuete
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Reged: 02/10/13

Loc: SoCal
Re: Companion to Polaris? new [Re: mitaccio]
      #5795779 - 04/13/13 02:28 AM

Cool, was wondering if I had an optics issue since I too was unaware Polaris was more than a single:)

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