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Napersky
Carpal Tunnel
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Reged: 01/27/10

Loc: Chicagoland
Re: Learning Calculus (Again) new [Re: CounterWeight]
      #5767612 - 03/30/13 09:00 PM

Quote:

... Calculus by itself and as originally introduced by Newton and Leibnitz would only require a few pages to fully describe...Most calculus texts are an overview or review of things you learned in algebra, trig, and geometry with the concepts of calculus applied to them.... So as N.D. Tyson mentioned in one of his talks it's 3 pages of information with another few hundred of applications.

...it is the 'application' of calculus that folks find troublesome. They maybe weren't keen on algebra or trig and here are pages of nothing but.
..








Yes, the table of contents from Calculus books I have certainly show that it is a system that is applied to algebra, trig, Geometry, analytical geometry etc, all maths.

I put aside the Dummies text and bought the text that Richard Feynman learned Calculus from at the age of 10. It is titled, "Mathematics for Self Study" CALCULUS for the Practical Man. Part of the practical man math series.

Am I smarter than a 10 year old Genius? Can I grasp it. Maybe, maybe not.



I believe the real test of Genius IQ is not some population Gaussian but rather can one master Math.


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Napersky
Carpal Tunnel
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Reged: 01/27/10

Loc: Chicagoland
Re: Learning Calculus (Again) new [Re: Napersky]
      #5767627 - 03/30/13 09:12 PM

I was recently mocked in an email from another site where one of the people wrote,

"Mark, aside from reading this book, (NOT EVEN WRONG) how are you qualified to judge physics and math at that level? In September 2009, you posted that you were teaching yourself math and physics, and looking at a web-site who's highest level was elementary calculus, basic pre-university stuff, or at best, first year. Have you progressed in 3.5 years to the PhD level?"

No Herr Professor I have not arrived at the Phd level neither have I arrived at learning elementry Calculus. I guess that some Physicists are just unable to defend and articulate their String Theory Multiverse theories and defend them without resulting to ad-hominem attacks of your sort.


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Napersky
Carpal Tunnel
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Reged: 01/27/10

Loc: Chicagoland
Re: Learning Calculus (Again) new [Re: Napersky]
      #5767909 - 03/30/13 11:56 PM

You Tube, Feynman studied Calculus at 13.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoHbFVU2LBk

http://www.feynmanphysicslectures.com/


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Napersky
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Reged: 01/27/10

Loc: Chicagoland
Off topic related to Feynman new [Re: Napersky]
      #5767947 - 03/31/13 12:27 AM

Feynman's Throat Singing Conference in Mongolia Tuva.
Last 8 minutes:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62kREUbKKMM&list=PLF6C801BDAE668CB2

Hear throat singing 1st minute

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mifi5iPzd8&list=PLF6C801BDAE668CB2

Perhaps the physics consultant of the Big Bang Theory decided to have Sheldon Cooper learn throat singing because of this story.


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Niels2011
super member


Reged: 06/09/11

Loc: UK
Re: Learning Calculus (Again) [Re: Ira]
      #5817879 - 04/23/13 04:07 PM

I'm enloying "The Theoretical Minimum: what you need to know to start doing physics" by Leonard Susskind and George Hrabovsky, 2013. This might fit the bill in a different way: it's not a calculus book, but it covers calculus amongst other maths and physics. I've just covered limits and part of the chapter on differentiation. Integration will be next. It's pretty good, challenging, but well explained, with excercises and worked answers. Designed for people who were interested in high school maths and physics, and then followed another career, but now want to go back to that interest again and go beyond popular science - so me and some of us here! It's just out so I thought it was worth highlighting. Also there are some excellent video lectures by Leonard Susskind on YouTube Stanford covering this material I think, so that might work well together. I've only checked out a couple of his cosmology lectures so far and liked them, which is why I noticed this book.

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