Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home pageAstronomics discounts for Cloudy Nights members
· Get a Cloudy Nights T-Shirt · Submit a Review / Article

Click here if you are having trouble logging into the forums

Privacy Policy | Please read our Terms of Service | Signup and Troubleshooting FAQ | Problems? PM a Red or a Green Gu… uh, User

General Astronomy >> Light Pollution

Pages: 1 | 2 | (show all)
George N
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 05/19/06

Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY
Re: Urban Sprawl From Google new [Re: George N]
      #5894005 - 05/31/13 10:46 AM

BTW, a few of those on-line SQM readings for Stellafane seem bogus to me. However, the sky brightness varies a great deal there for the same reason it does around my southern NY home: 80+ percent of the people live in a river valley that sometimes fogs up (holding in the light) while it is clear on the high grounds. The difference is very noticeable. Humidity also impacts sky brightness. My own SQM readings at Stellafane over the years have varied from 20.9 to 21.5 (mostly 21.2), and visually the appearance had the same difference. There is a light dome to the north at all times.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
BrooksObs
professor emeritus


Reged: 12/08/12

Re: Urban Sprawl From Google new [Re: George N]
      #5895298 - 05/31/13 11:43 PM

I'll expand on the Stellafane experience a step further from the visual standpoint. When I first started attending the conventions back in the early 1960's the place was as dark as can possibly be imagined, fully equal to many of the observatory sites in the American SW that I visited subsequently. No trace whatever of the village of Springfield, or surrounding villages, could be detected from the mountain, only the aircraft warning lights on hills far to the north.

With the passage of the years I saw the light-dome form over the village, at first hardly visible. But it brightened and rose as time passed. By the mid 1980's it reached half way up the eastern sky and at least weakly attained the zenith around 2000. By that time Brattleboro far to the south was clearly apparent from the new campgrounds. Today, unless the village is shrouded in ground fog, its light dome diffuses somewhere into the western sky and there is minor interference all around.

Don't get me wrong, Stellafane's skies are still superior to pretty much what any of the rest of us endure from home, but it still is a marked and obvious decline relative to what once was. Incidentally, beginning about 1995-2000, when driving home on some Saturday nights, I note that no actually dark sky location exists anywhere south of Stellafane along Rt 91 any more all the way to the coast. A rather sad commentary on our plight indeed.

BrooksObs

Edited by BrooksObs (05/31/13 11:50 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
BigC
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 09/29/10

Loc: SE Indiana
Re: Urban Sprawl From Google new [Re: BrooksObs]
      #5895489 - 06/01/13 03:26 AM

There are people who insist that the light blazing upward is the sign of a vibrant economy and prosperity.

They love to post a pic of the Korean penisula as if wasteful lighting is the best indicator of freedom.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Tony Flanders
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 05/18/06

Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA
Re: Urban Sprawl From Google new [Re: BrooksObs]
      #5899083 - 06/03/13 06:47 AM

Quote:

By that time Brattleboro far to the south was clearly apparent from the new campgrounds.




It's hard to trace a light dome to any single source; after all, there are towns along the Connecticut all the way from its source to Long Island Sound. And headlights on I-91 generate a huge amount of light, too. My guess is that Brattleboro is a fairly minor contributor. Locals say that the compact bright source to the south is actually a truck stop on I-91.

Disturbingly, there's a huge diffuse source to the southeast that's presumably Greater Boston.

Quote:

Today, unless the village is shrouded in ground fog, its light dome diffuses somewhere into the western sky and there is minor interference all around.




Agreed. Stellafane isn't anywhere close to dark. By northern-Vermont standards, it's actually rather bright. But multiple light domes are visible from even the darkest Vermont sites.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
aatt
sage


Reged: 07/26/12

Loc: CT
Re: Urban Sprawl From Google new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5910640 - 06/08/13 11:53 PM

My house in CT was in a yellowish zone in 1998-now it is a solid orange with red not far to the west. My first real awareness of light pollution per se and its' impacts upon astronomy was in 1986 where I had to go to the outskirts of Port Orange Florida to gain a glimpse of Halleys Comet. Even there it was a sketchy. That "remotish" road locations where I escaped some of the lp, of course, has expanded to a massive through way and is nested in miles of sprawl. All this happened in a single decade-Florida's destruction is one of the great ecological tragedies of the lower 48 as well as an astronomical tragedy. Some of the darkest and steadiest skies in the nation are now bathed in car dealership lights and strip mall lighting-some of which is directed up so you will know where to shop in the day......

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
derangedhermit
Pooh-Bah


Reged: 10/07/09

Loc: USA
Re: Urban Sprawl From Google new [Re: aatt]
      #5910710 - 06/09/13 12:50 AM

Florida was a special place, a unique place.

I've noticed how dark it is when you're out on the water - in the Gulf, one of the Great Lakes, the Baltic (not during the summer of course), the Mediterranean. OK, the Mediterranian wasn't so dark where I was, but maybe there are dark parts.

I've also noticed flying over the oceans at night how dark the sky is, and how quickly you can learn to recognize where you are by the lights on the ground seven miles below you, and how beautiful the sunrises can be up there.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
BrooksObs
professor emeritus


Reged: 12/08/12

Re: Urban Sprawl From Google [Re: derangedhermit]
      #5910969 - 06/09/13 08:19 AM

Quote:

I've noticed how dark it is when you're out on the water - in the Gulf, one of the Great Lakes, the Baltic (not during the summer of course), the Mediterranean. OK, the Mediterranian wasn't so dark where I was, but maybe there are dark parts.




Over the years I've had the good fortune to have occasionally observed from some of the supposedly "darkest" locations in the world. Nevertheless, the darkest skies I ever encountered were on the Island of Nantucket off the Massachussetts coast about 40 years ago.

On that occasion the island was surrounded by a low sea fog which blocked all the already subtle light from the mainland (the island itself had virtually no local lighting at night back then). Although fully dark adapted I was quite unable to see any indication whatever of my observing companion who was backed by a distance line of dark trees, even though he was only about 25' from me! The NLM, which I took great pains to determine, was very close to 8.0 .

BrooksObs

Edited by BrooksObs (06/09/13 10:09 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1 | 2 | (show all)


Extra information
0 registered and 3 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  LivingNDixie, richard7 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 2849

Jump to

CN Forums Home


Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics