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Equipment Discussions >> Video and Electronically Assisted Astronomy

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Dark Matter
member


Reged: 02/25/13

NexGuide AG: Are they any good?
      #5949071 - 07/01/13 03:25 AM

Am tossing up which way to go on AG's. All my mounts have the RJ12 plug which is the ST4 protocol. How good is this product? Does it work for you? Any cons?

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rmollise
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Reged: 07/06/07

Re: NexGuide AG: Are they any good? new [Re: Dark Matter]
      #5949211 - 07/01/13 07:42 AM

They work...but... They need relatively bright stars (not too bright, though). The small screen can be a pain to use. And focusing may be a little difficult. All in all, if you HAVE to work without a computer, one might be pretty good for the price...but don't expect it to be as easy to use as say an Orion StarShoot and PHD.

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John59
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Reged: 11/06/11

Loc: Round Rock,TX
Re: NexGuide AG: Are they any good? new [Re: Dark Matter]
      #5949558 - 07/01/13 12:19 PM

I have both the Nexguide and Orion's magnificant miniguider.
As Rod says..the Nexguide works, however require at least 70mm and preferably 80mm guidescope.
Even Celestron pairs them with their 80mm guidescope when bought as a package.
The Orion Autoguider cam works well down to 50mm making their finder scope size mini-guider less bulky and requiring less hardware.
I have done a side by side comparison of the two.
The Orion sees more stars in light polluted skies in a 50mm aperture that the Nexstar does in a 80mm aperture.
If you are going to be using a computer all the time and it can handle all the tasks you want it to do, then the Orion is the best choice, performance wise.
The Nexduide was intended for DSLR users (no computers) and does a remarkable job in dark skies with at least 70mm aperture.
It does well in light polluted areas but ONLY if there are bright stars in the area of the object of interest.
This however is not always the case.
When I am in dark(er) skies than my in town location, I will use the Nexguide.


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Dark Matter
member


Reged: 02/25/13

Re: NexGuide AG: Are they any good? new [Re: John59]
      #5950151 - 07/01/13 06:38 PM

Thanks Rod and John.

I have dark skies down to Mv6.5. My two g/scope are 10 and 12cm aperture so it looks as though the NexGuide is the way to go. I need to be independent as all my mounts are under computer control. This unit, the SynGuide and the Lacerta Mgen seem to share the same protocol. I do have a Orion SSAG but find that unit a bit slow and not as sensitive as one would like. From your experience with AG's, what is the faintest star you have guided on successfully?

Thanks,

James


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mega256
scholastic sledgehammer
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Reged: 05/10/07

Loc: N of Tampa
Re: NexGuide AG: Are they any good? new [Re: Dark Matter]
      #5950178 - 07/01/13 07:00 PM

I have both a QHY5 and a new QHY5L-II....the new one is Very sensitive...more then
the QHY5..(ssimular to SSAG)...
Also it is a good ccd camera..
web page


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rmollise
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Reged: 07/06/07

Re: NexGuide AG: Are they any good? new [Re: Dark Matter]
      #5950227 - 07/01/13 07:33 PM

Quote:

Thanks Rod and John.

I have dark skies down to Mv6.5. My two g/scope are 10 and 12cm aperture so it looks as though the NexGuide is the way to go. I need to be independent as all my mounts are under computer control. This unit, the SynGuide and the Lacerta Mgen seem to share the same protocol. I do have a Orion SSAG but find that unit a bit slow and not as sensitive as one would like. From your experience with AG's, what is the faintest star you have guided on successfully?

Thanks,

James




I've never quantified the brightness levels required by each, but suffice to say, the Orion StarShoot and the 50mm guidescope see fainter stars than the Celestron. If you have your telescopes "under computer control," why not let the computers do the guiding as well? Finally, I've never found the StarShoot camera to be "slow" in any way.


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dawziecat
Carpal Tunnel
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Reged: 10/20/10

Loc: Rural Nova Scotia
Re: NexGuide AG: Are they any good? new [Re: rmollise]
      #5951514 - 07/02/13 03:19 PM

I sure won't say the Nexguide doesn't work.
But it is not easy to get one working.

Best move I ever made was selling mine and replacing it with an SSAG and PHD guiding.

Yah, I know. People don't want to use a computer out there. I didn't either. But I learned.

More on Nexguide than you likely want to know in THIS CN thread.

I found it hard to focus, hard to set up, an atrocious battery hog and had a proclivity to latch onto its own hot pixels and guide away happily even with the lens cap on the guide 'scope.

I would not go back to the Nexguide.


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