Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home page


Astrophotography and Sketching >> Solar System Imaging & Processing

Pages: 1
smitty0
member


Reged: 03/17/12

Volcano on the Moon? new
      #5980261 - 07/19/13 05:52 PM Attachment (57 downloads)

It could be a active volcano on the Moon? I think is dome 'Herodotus 1'
Longitude: 50 56 ' West
Latitude: 25 28 ' North
Quadrant: North - West
Area: Aristarchus crater region

Video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHb9S0-DCTU&feature=youtu.be
2013-07-20 00:04
Celestron C9.25 [235/f25], camera QHY5L-IIm, IRpass filter 720nm.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
desertstars

*****

Reged: 11/05/03

Loc: Tucson, AZ
Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: smitty0]
      #5980323 - 07/19/13 06:25 PM

I believe that's the tip of Mons Herodotus catching the first rays of the morning sun.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
rmollise
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 07/06/07

Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: desertstars]
      #5980343 - 07/19/13 06:37 PM

Quote:

I believe that's the tip of Mons Herodotus catching the first rays of the morning sun.




Yep.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
smitty0
member


Reged: 03/17/12

Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: desertstars]
      #5980350 - 07/19/13 06:45 PM

Quote:

I believe that's the tip of Mons Herodotus catching the first rays of the morning sun.



But it so bright... Ok, tomorrow will try to make more pictures of this location.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
azure1961p
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: smitty0]
      #5980873 - 07/20/13 03:47 AM

I'd be highly inclined to believe its not an active volcano.

Pete


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Mert
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 08/31/05

Loc: Spain, Pamplona
Re: Volcano on the Moon? [Re: azure1961p]
      #5980886 - 07/20/13 04:29 AM

IMHO looks like a mountain top still in the dark side
already hit by sunlight.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
smitty0
member


Reged: 03/17/12

Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: Mert]
      #5980921 - 07/20/13 05:43 AM

Understood - i think is peak of Mons Herodotus. His albedo is very high. Snow cap

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Mirzam
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 04/01/08

Loc: Lovettsville, VA
Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: smitty0]
      #5981090 - 07/20/13 09:46 AM

If you wanted to analyze the possibility that this was a hot source (i.e. active volcano) you could make measurements at multiple wavelengths, including IR, and compare the shape of the pseudo-radiance curve with the shapes from other illuminated areas of the Moon. (Pseudo-radiance because you have not corrected for the filter transmission). If the "volcano" has a stronger red-IR response versus other areas it may be due to a higher surface temperature. The other possible cause would be a difference in rock composition, but this is likely to be relatively subtle in a radiance measurement.

I don't think it is a volcano, but just wanted to point out that amateurs could easily collect data to characterize these sorts of features if so inclined.

JimC


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
AlanL
sage


Reged: 11/11/10

Loc: Kansas, USA
Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: Mirzam]
      #5981491 - 07/20/13 02:01 PM

JimC - I like your thinking!

Conventional wisdom is the moon is geologically inactive. If this is an active volcano, it would be the first we have seen!


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Mirzam
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 04/01/08

Loc: Lovettsville, VA
Re: Volcano on the Moon? new [Re: AlanL]
      #5981552 - 07/20/13 02:48 PM

Actually, an even simpler way to monitor the Moon for hotspots would be to create ratio images, for example, IR/G. There would be variations across the lunar surface, and no doubt noisy data within shadows (easily masked out), but extremely high values that appear localized to a small area would be interesting to examine more closely.

Of course you might have to persist for a long time to discover anything (Hundreds, thousands, millions of years?)

JimC


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1


Extra information
8 registered and 13 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  TG, Starman81, bilgebay, WOBentley 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 584

Jump to

CN Forums Home




Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics