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Sarkikos
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Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Suburban Maryland, USA
Re: Moon and Skyglow filter - really? new [Re: BSJ]
      #6048367 - 08/27/13 08:41 AM

Quote:

I like using my M&SG stacked with a fringe killer on the Moon and Jupiter. Heck I even like using that combo when I view the sun with a Baader film white light filter.

Just more comfortable and I see more detail. Same on my Newts and SCT.




Stacking the M&SG with FK is supposed to give results close to the Baader SemiApo filter. I have all three filters. It is close. I've experimented with that combo, and with each filter separately, for viewing the bright planets. I still prefer the M&SG alone in most cases, and sometimes stacked with a good color filter.

Mike


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Sarkikos
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Reged: 12/18/07

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Re: Moon and Skyglow filter - really? new [Re: Eric63]
      #6048377 - 08/27/13 08:48 AM

Quote:

I have both the M&SG filter and the contrast booster. I bought them when I had my 102mm F5 achro, but unfortunately nothing could help that scope on the planets I'm now curious to try them on my Mak and Newt on Jupiter.

Eric




Sounds like my experience with an ST80, also an f/5 achro. Great for rich-field wide-field low-power views of DSO. Not so good for lunar and planets - even with a SemiApo filter, VR-1, Fringe Killer, what have you. Maybe OK for low-power views of the Moon, but I wouldn't bother taking a scope out for just lunar low-power.

But with a Mak or Newt, now you're talking. A good contrast filter will improve the view of the bright planets with those scopes.

Mike


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Eric63
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Reged: 06/16/12

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Re: Moon and Skyglow filter - really? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6048390 - 08/27/13 08:54 AM

Well Mike, I think it's time to dust off those filters. Thanks to all for the advice.

Eric


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Sarkikos
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Re: Moon and Skyglow filter - really? new [Re: LThomas]
      #6048400 - 08/27/13 08:59 AM

Quote:

My Issue is the moon is blinding in the telescope. I use an ES 18MM*82 EP and I just cant stand looking at the moon as its so bright.

Is there a filter that will reduce this brightness so that one is able to actually view the moon without being permanently blind?

I have the Zhumel "see it all" filter set but no filter seems to hardly do any good in reducing the blinding glare of the moon.




You can use a neutral density filter to reduce the perceived glare when viewing the Moon through a telescope. But that glare is only "perceived." If you were to view the Moon through that same telescope at the same magnification during the day, I guarantee it would not seem too bright. The reason the Moon appears so bright at night is that your eyes are not prepared properly to view it.

What you can do is just bare with it and allow your eyes to become accustomed to the level of brightness that the Moon provides in your telescope.

Or you can increase magnification to reduce the exit pupil and the brightness of the image.

Or you can make sure that your eyes are correctly adapted before viewing the Moon. Do this by keeping ambient white light on near your observing area or by looking at the reflection from a piece of white paper as you shine a bright white-light flashlight on it. Even partial dark adaptation is not needed for viewing the Moon. Your eyes should be photopic adapted (like they are during the day).

Mike


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BSJ
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Reged: 12/22/08

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Re: Moon and Skyglow filter - really? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6048472 - 08/27/13 09:46 AM

Yeah, I started with a 1.25" FK and M&SG. I tried them alone but liked them better stacked.

I didn't want to spend the money on one each in 2" so I got a 2" SimiApo. To me the stacked filters gave a more neutral coloring. The SimiApo gives things a bit more yellow than I would have liked. But I'll live with it becasue I want to stick with 2" stuff.


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Rick Woods
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Re: Moon and Skyglow filter - really? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6048888 - 08/27/13 01:47 PM

Quote:

Quote:

My Issue is the moon is blinding in the telescope. I use an ES 18MM*82 EP and I just cant stand looking at the moon as its so bright.

Is there a filter that will reduce this brightness so that one is able to actually view the moon without being permanently blind?

I have the Zhumel "see it all" filter set but no filter seems to hardly do any good in reducing the blinding glare of the moon.




You can use a neutral density filter to reduce the perceived glare when viewing the Moon through a telescope.




A variable polarizing filter is also very handy for this.


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JimK
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Reged: 09/18/05

Loc: Albuquerque, NM USA
Re: Moon and Skyglow filter - really? new [Re: LThomas]
      #6049183 - 08/27/13 04:13 PM

Quote:

My Issue is the moon is blinding in the telescope. I use an ES 18MM*82 EP and I just cant stand looking at the moon as its so bright.

Is there a filter that will reduce this brightness so that one is able to actually view the moon without being permanently blind?

I have the Zhumel "see it all" filter set but no filter seems to hardly do any good in reducing the blinding glare of the moon.



I just observe a bright moon with white lights on (house, garage, etc.). This makes it very easy to read charts and such, find my stuff, and enjoy a bright moon. For outreach where there are minimal lights I use a ND9 (13% transmission neutral density) grey filter, but for personal use I generally just leave the lights on. Some people recommend just increasing magnification to dim the view, but air turbulence, or what details you wish to view, may not support high magnification.

I also use the Moon-Skyglow, since I have one, on the moon itself -- my eyes enjoy the mild effect of subtle glare reduction. When combined (not directly stacked, but with a diagonal for separation) with a Fringe-Killer on the moon, my 100mm f/10 achro refractor has less chromatic aberration visible to me and a more pleasing tone (less yellow from the Fringe-Killer alone). I also have the Contrast Booster (it has a definite yellow tint) that I just use for more pleasing solar views using Baader solar film (which has a slight bluish tint) -- and I sometimes use it on Jupiter for bands.

To *my* eyes, a polarizer pair adds fuzziness in addition to dimming the view, so I have stopped using them.

In all cases, filters just remove things that may detract from a view, and telescopes/eyepieces/eyeballs are all different, such that some like to use filters, others do not, and the overall effects in one situation are different from another.


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