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Observing >> Deep Sky Observing

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Sasa
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/03/10

Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic
Observing report with ED100 - Nov 7, 2013 new
      #6183196 - 11/08/13 03:38 PM

Hello,

yesterday there was unexpected nice relatively warm and quite nice night with dark sky. I'm afraid, the last one this year. I grub out my ED100 refractor mounted on Zeiss T-Mount.

I started with reflection nebula NGC1624. In couple of last nights I was trying to explore some to me unknown small reflection nebulae plotted in Pocket Sky Atlas between Perseus and Auriga. I had good luck with NGC1491 and NGC1579. This night I had also good luck with NGC1624. At small magnifications it was suspicious rounded very week milky spot with one central star of 11-12th magnitude. With more magnification, there were several milky concentrations in it. However they turned out at magnifications of 150x and 265x to be a group of faint stars. These were definitely parts of open cluster associated with the nebulosity. At home I found very interesting fact about the "central star". In fact, this is a star with strongest magnetic field between massive stars.

Then I checked nearby open cluster Berkeley67 but I had no luck again.

I then found on Uranometria 2000.0 two small nearby open clusters. NGC1724 was nothing than just 3 very close stars, they looked like a small milky spot in small magnification. The funny thing is that this group was discovered by Rumker in 4in refractor, so I probably saw it as Rumker almost 150 years ago.

The other one NGC1798, was nothing than just small (3-3.5') very faint milky rounded spot with a faint star on its western edge. This one is in fact quite dense open cluster but one would need a larger telescope to resolve it. Again, the discoverer was quite unusual. It was Edward Barnard in his early days when he was observing with his own 5in refractor and 6in refractor in Nashville observatory.

Then I decided to look at galaxy M77. Finally, I saw it (now only M7 is missing to finish the Messier list). Galaxy nucleus is very bright, it takes magnification very well, I was using up to 265x. I had a feeling that there is some hint of spiral or bar going out of the center in ENE direction.

I was also checking nearby galaxy NGC1055 but I saw only suspicious slightly milky faint star but nothing for certain.

Then I tried to spot IC349 nebula near Merope. No luck at all, I was using magnifications from 106x up to 562x.

At the end I jumped to area of Orion's sword. I stopped at NGC2169 known also as '37 cluster'. I even made a sketch of this wonderful tiny bright cluster. I noticed at 56x some nice color contrast between the members. Most of the stars were blueish but the brightest one (by the way nice tight couple) was yellowish and the two most northern bright stars (in letter 7) were orange (the south one) and reddish (the northern one). Looking at some images later at home, it looks like I saw them correctly. I think here the TMB Monocentric was very helpful. I never saw such nice and clean views as through this eyepiece.

Next stop was open cluster NGC2194. At 56x this one was very nice 8' large rounded milky spot with some peppering and more than 10 stars scattered across its surface. The cluster almost disappeared.

Recently, I learned that there is another open cluster just 15' east of it. It was discovered by Brian Skiff in 1975 in 25cm reflector. Its name is Skiff J0614.8+1252. Without prior knowledge I would miss this one. In 10cm refractor it was nothing than just very small inconspicuous group of 3-4 very faint stars with some milky background elongated in N-S direction.

Then I noticed in Uranometria 2000.0 that there is yet another cluster bearing similar name Skiff J0619.3+1832. I could not find too much about it on internet however this one was quite fine cluster at low power of 23x. It was relatively distinct concentration of several fainter stars (10mag and fainter), about 10 with direct vision and about 20 with averted one. It had slightly elongated triangular shape with size of about 20'. There was even some milky background in one smaller part of the cluster.

And finally the last stop was interesting bipolar nebula NGC2163. Last year, all I could see was just rounded haze around faint star. This time I saw that the northern part is brighter and from time to time it even looked like a small comet. I did not see its full bipolar character though. The southern 'jet' was invisible to my eyes.

Finally, I had a quick look at Jupiter, the first one in current opposition. However, the seeing was bad even at 130x. I'm sure, next time it will be better.


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IVM
Pooh-Bah


Reged: 01/07/08

Loc: Western New York
Re: Observing report with ED100 - Nov 7, 2013 new [Re: Sasa]
      #6183592 - 11/08/13 08:12 PM

Nice observing session.

Quote:


Then I decided to look at galaxy M77. Finally, I saw it (now only M7 is missing to finish the Messier list). Galaxy nucleus is very bright, it takes magnification very well, I was using up to 265x. I had a feeling that there is some hint of spiral or bar going out of the center in ENE direction.




This is the most contrasty feature that I have seen in this galaxy. It corresponds to an actual spiral arm segment in photographs.

Sketch:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ngsU_P94pYA/URa_DKxCYhI/AAAAAAAAAYM/GQT9qEFM4HA/s16...

Description:
http://idle-stargazer.blogspot.com/2013/02/m76-and-m77.html


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Sasa
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/03/10

Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic
Re: Observing report with ED100 - Nov 7, 2013 new [Re: IVM]
      #6184837 - 11/09/13 02:53 PM

Thanks Ivan for the links. Had no time to actually check the observed features in M77 with images, yet. In fact I also noticed, but forgot to mention, that: "preceding part of the galaxy body seems brighter". This also agrees well with your sketch.

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Sasa
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/03/10

Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic
Re: Observing report with ED100 - Nov 7, 2013 new [Re: Sasa]
      #6185011 - 11/09/13 04:29 PM

And here are two quick sketches from that night:





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azure1961p
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: Observing report with ED100 - Nov 7, 2013 new [Re: Sasa]
      #6185356 - 11/09/13 08:02 PM

Alex -

Ah - more objects to add to my fall deepsky list. I particularly like the two objects illustrated. The stars emerging out if the reflection nebulosity sounds quite captivating. The colors of the stars in 2169 is something I must see as well. All entries observed sound great thing I temper my own ideas with the reality of the site ill be using tomorrow night is a toss up. Sky Safari actually shows the color of the member like you have shown.
Nice work.

Edited by azure1961p (11/09/13 08:16 PM)


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Sasa
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/03/10

Loc: Ricany, Czech Republic
Re: Observing report with ED100 - Nov 7, 2013 [Re: azure1961p]
      #6186909 - 11/10/13 03:48 PM

Let me know how you perceive the color of the brightest member of NGC2169. I saw it clearly yellowish (or a little bit golden) but images show it blueish as most of the members of the cluster. And bluish it should be as it is of spectral type B1. However, I have noticed in past already that I see some very hot stars of spectral class O definitely as yellowish - for example, the brightest member of Trapez, star C, or the central star STF 2816 in Trumpler 37 (in IC1396), to name few. May be this is the same case.

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