Jump to content

  •  

Latest News




Cosmic Challenge: NGC 4361

Apr 03 2024 12:31 PM | PhilH in Phil Harrington's Cosmic Challenge

Corvus, the celestial crow, flies low in the spring sky as viewed from the northern hemisphere. Located between the constellations Virgo and Hydra, it is easily identifiable by its compact shape resembling a perched bird. The crow carries with it but one notable deep-sky object for backyard telescopes. Planetary nebula NGC 4361 is almost perfectly centered within Corvus's trapezoidal body.

Read story →    -----

The Skies of April, 2024

Apr 03 2024 11:39 AM | cookman in This Month

Highlights: Comet Journal, Martian Landers, Meteor Showers, Planet Plotting, April Moon Focus Constellations: Ursa Major, Ursa Minor, Draco, Cepheus, Cassiopeia, Camelopardalis, Lynx, Leo Minor, Canes Venatici, Bootes, Coma Berenices, Leo, Cancer, Gemini, Auriga, Perseus

Read story →    -----

The Skies of March, 2024

Mar 21 2024 03:36 PM | cookman in This Month

Highlights: Comet Journal, Martian Landers, Meteor Showers, Planet Plotting, March Moon Focus Constellations: Ursa Major, Ursa Minor, Draco, Cepheus, Cassiopeia, Camelopardalis, Lynx, Leo Minor, Coma Berenices, Canes Venatici, Bootes, Leo, Cancer, Gemini, Auriga, Taurus, Perseus

Read story →    -----

How to add a counterweight to a Unitron AZ 114 or 140 mount

Mar 01 2024 07:00 AM | bmwscopeguy in CN Reports

With this easy addition, the scope is now ‘almost’ in balance through most of its motion, and the springs have an easier time returning the scope to the horizontal position. And the best thing is that it requires no alteration of the mount and is fully and easily reversible if you choose.

Read story →    -----

Review of a discarded 2003 National Geographic Society 50mm Refractor

Mar 01 2024 07:00 AM | timmywampus in User Reviews

The scope, as tested for this review, would be one that I would be willing to give to a person that I did not like, but even then, I like astronomy too much to spite someone away from the hobby. For free, this telescope was worth picking up and providing a day’s worth of entertainment, but I would rather spend $27.99 on other equipment. Conclusion: Do not buy, whether in “Classic” or “Modern Era” trim.

Read story →    *****

EQM35 Pro - getting it working right

Mar 01 2024 07:00 AM | Gianluca67 in Articles

The EQM35 Pro is a good grab&go mount to go to your favourite dark site with a measured photographic payload of about 7 kgs. It can track the sky very well but it needs some tweaking to get it work right. Adjusting the engagement between worm and worm gears on both axis as well as releasing a bit the central nuts of both axis are operations of vital importance to get good guiding. It will never perform like an Astrophysics but overall it can be a good mount if you want a lightweight, portable mount to use with scopes up to 6” under dark skies.

Read story →    -----

Cosmic Challenge: NGC 2403

Mar 01 2024 07:00 AM | PhilH in Phil Harrington's Cosmic Challenge

Hovering above the northeastern horizon at this time of year is the obscure constellation Camelopardalis the Giraffe. Though the human eye alone reveals little more than a void populated by a scattering of 4th-magnitude and fainter stars, binoculars begin to unleash some of the beast's latent wonders. One of the Giraffe's few hidden treasures that is visible through binoculars is NGC 2403, a spectacular spiral galaxy tilted nearly face-on to our perspective.

Read story →    *****

The Skles of February, 2024

Feb 04 2024 09:54 AM | cookman in This Month

Highlights: Comet Journal, Martian Landers, Meteor Showers, Planet Plotting, February Moon Focus Constellations: Ursa Major, Ursa Minor, Draco, Cepheus, Cassiopeia, Camelopardalis, Lynx, Leo, Cancer, Gemini, Auriga, Taurus, Perseus, Andromeda, Pegasus, Aries, Pisces

Read story →    -----

Cosmic Challenge: Abell 12

Feb 01 2024 07:00 AM | PhilH in Phil Harrington's Cosmic Challenge

Deep-sky objects can be challenging for several reasons. Some are especially faint, while others are especially small, and still others are so large that they can't fit into a single eyepiece field. Or the problem might be that a particular target is so close to another, noticeably brighter object that the light from that intruder all but obliterates the quarry. The latter problem plagues planetary nebula Abell 12. It shines at about 14th magnitude, which is not exactly bright, but is also not exceptionally dim for a telescope 10 inches (25 cm) or more in aperture. The problem, however, is that it is located a scant arcminute away from 4th-magnitude Mu (μ) Orionis. That's why it's known by the nickname the Hidden Planetary.

Read story →    *****

Unitron Model 114 - a quick look

Feb 01 2024 07:00 AM | bmwscopeguy in User Reviews

If today’s entry level scopes could offer this combination of optical performance and smooth/rigid mounts – the manufacturers wouldn’t be bedeviled by constant negative reviews.

Read story →    *****




Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics