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Kids Archives

When I Was a Little Boy...

Dec 28 2009 07:42 AM | Otis10 in Kids

The dust streamed from clenched fists on outstretched arms as I circled the yard just one more time. I was a jet. Soaring high on the imagination of a young boy. Just a little more

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Author name: Dennis Plott
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Kids: Impressed by a 7 year old

Mar 29 2005 11:12 AM | Guest in Kids

As I was browsing the Cloudy Nights web site I noted the segment about kids and astronomy. I am very much impressed with what is being done to help kids get into astronomy. I would like to share the story of our 7 year old daughter, Rebekah. She is just your ordinary child who like ordinary children things.

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Author name: Kathy Siebert
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On a Warm, Clear Summer Evening

Mar 22 2005 11:49 AM | Guest in Kids

It was August 25, 2001 and the day was ending with a deep blue, cloudless sky. The moon in its first quarter phase and scheduled to set at 11:55 pm. While my wife and I were finishing dinner, I mentioned that it looked like it would be a good night for astronomy. She wished me good luck, and said that she needed to finish reading a book for book club. So, I had a plan, the weather was warm and the wind light, and since it hadn't rained in a week, I was hoping that the mosquitoes would be light. After cleaning up the dishes, I hauled my 12" dobsonian telescope, card table, chair and other astronomy stuff out into the backyard. I went back inside and I printed out a few star charts using a computer program called "Starry Night".

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Author name: Anders Johnsson
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Kids: Hey Josh

Mar 22 2005 04:45 PM | Guest in Kids

It's a warm summer evening and you have your favorite telescope and star charts set up in your back yard. Deeply engrossed in finding that elusive 12th magnitude galaxy that is supposedly an "easy find" you are startled by the following question;

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Author name: Kent Allison
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Kids: The Solar Session

Mar 29 2005 10:07 AM | CN_Admin in Kids

It started off innocently enough. Never stopping to think I was only one guy and never having put on an observing session of this scale, I never imagined what it would lead to. Oh sure, among other things, I've observed with students, given presentations to the girl scouts, been a guest speaker for several different classes, and taught a summer astronomy class for interested youngsters.

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Author name: Tom Trusock
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Kids: Engaging Kids in Astronomy

Mar 29 2005 10:09 AM | Guest in Kids

I had just aligned the scope and told it to find Saturn when my neighbor's grandchildren came out of the house with their Dad to head home. On the way to their car the kids (a girl age 10 and a boy age 5) stopped and noticed all my equipment set up in the driveway.

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Author name: Jamie Seibert
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Kids: Robby's Night!

Mar 29 2005 10:11 AM | Guest in Kids

I asked him if he would like to see what he was really looking at on the computer and he excitedly nodded. Using my Planetarium skychart software, I was able to show him a photo of the cluster. He looked at the photo, looked through the 8"sct, and with bigol' fish eyes said "WOW!" He looked back at the computer and asked to see the maps again.

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Author name: Don Spencer
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Kids: The Neighborly Summer Skies

Mar 29 2005 10:14 AM | Guest in Kids

The willingness of astronomers to teach what they have learned is one great asset we have that has the potential to bring many others into our ranks. All we need to do then is learn what will enthrall a listener, and what could put the spark in their head that would make them want to learn astronomy for themselves.

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Author name: Justin Montgomery
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Kids: Summer Triangle

Mar 29 2005 10:16 AM | Guest in Kids

I had contemplated getting out my 10” dob to find that 12th magnitude galaxy I had been wanting to add to my list, but my family was busy elsewhere tonight and unable to accompany me out into the country for some really dark sky viewing. I'd have to settle for the small scope since it handled the ambient light pollution a little better and was more fun anyway.

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Author name: Jane Gauker
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Kids: Reintroducing the Wonder of the Starry Sky | Contemporary Children and Astronomy

Mar 29 2005 10:18 AM | JayKSC in Kids

In today's technology savvy world, the youth of society have grown accustomed to the fast-paced nature of daily life, the instant gratification stemming from the completion of tasks, and the vivid imagery provided by electronic entertainment. With these factors of modern life, how can it be that the night sky, filled with its silent, seemingly serene stars, might still invoke senses of interest and wonder?

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Author name: Jay Michaels
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Kids: In the backyard (with James the boogeyman)

Mar 29 2005 10:21 AM | Guest in Kids

While looking once again for NGC 5466 that very dim, low surface brightness globular cluster on the Bootes - Canes Venatici border near M3, swatting mosquitos that are fervently trying to deprive me of any enjoyment, I hear the giggles and small voices of some of the kids from down the street talking in low tones and whispers.

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Author name: Jim Nadeau
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Kids: The Salty Bear Principle

Mar 29 2005 10:23 AM | Guest in Kids

OK, so I was only 12. And I didn¹t exactly sneak up on Mr. Morton the way you imply. He saw me coming, clear as daylight. In fact, it was daylight -- at first, anyway.

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Author name: Brent Orton
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Kids: Kids and The Practical Astronomer

Mar 29 2005 10:24 AM | Guest in Kids

Like most backyard astronomers, I did my best to introduce the neighborhood children to the wonders of the night sky. I showed them my Newtonian and explained how it worked. I told them some of the things that I can see with it; I told them about galaxies, open and globular clusters, and other objects

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Author name: Elwood Smith
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Kids: The study of the sky and celestial bodies

Mar 29 2005 10:28 AM | EdZ in Kids

Our galaxy is called the MILKY WAY. There are billions of stars in the Milky Way. Sometimes when you look up at the night sky you can see the hazy light of millions of stars along the edge of the Milky Way. All the stars that we can see are within our galaxy. A very close neighbor galaxy that we can see without optical aid is the ANDROMEDA GALAXY. Andromeda

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Author name: Ed Zarenski
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Kids: Master Doc 01-09

Mar 29 2005 10:30 AM | EdZ in Kids

Kids: Master Doc 01-09

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Author name: Ed Zarenski
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Kids: Maps

Mar 29 2005 10:32 AM | EdZ in Kids

Kids: Maps

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Author name: Ed Zarenski
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Kids: Outline Doc

Mar 29 2005 10:34 AM | EdZ in Kids

This outline describes a program I have put together for introducing children to the hobby and science of Astronomy. Generally it takes three hours to complete the entire program, half indoors and half outdoors under the stars. Preferably, the program should take place when the second half of the program would be outdoors under nighttime skies.

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Author name: Ed Zarenski
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Kids: Flyer

Mar 29 2005 10:36 AM | EdZ in Kids

The NCMS PTO is sponsoring an Astronomy Night for everyone who is interested in learning more about our Solar System, the Sun and it's planets, the names of constellations and some of the brightest stars in the sky, our galaxy

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Author name: Ed Zarenski
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Kids: A Complete Astronomy Presentation

Mar 29 2005 10:37 AM | EdZ in Kids

It was a little over two years ago now that I was out in the yard one night when my son Aaron and the kids from across the street wanted to see what I was looking at through my telescope. I don’t remember what I was viewing at the time, but I turned my attention to a few cool objects to show them.

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Author name: Ed Zarenski
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Kids: A Night With A New Friend

Mar 29 2005 10:39 AM | Guest in Kids

It's a warm night on July 14th. Like most clear nights, I decided to setup my 8" PortaBall dobsonian telescope (The Snowball). I'm deeply engrossed in finding that elusive 12th magnitude galaxy that is supposedly an "easy find" when I am startled by the following question:

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Author name: Kevin Pfeifle
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Kids: A Midsummer Night's Dream

Mar 29 2005 10:41 AM | Guest in Kids

We've all probably encountered this scenario or some variation of it at some time. So, WHAT DO YOU DO? Do you politely answer their questions? Do you show them some celestial sights, and if so, what? What happens next may pass as nothing more than a friendly exchange, a satisfying of curiosities.

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Author name: Bill Krosney
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Kids: Introducing Neighbors to Your Friends

Mar 29 2005 10:46 AM | Guest in Kids

If you use your telescope in an area where others can find you, you will, sooner or later, encounter visitors. The glow of a red flashlight and the whirring of machinery will eventually draw passers by to at least say "hello".

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Author name: Robert Knauf
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Kids: Astronomy for Kids

Mar 29 2005 10:48 AM | stanyen in Kids

No other area of science excites the public imagination in quite the same way that astronomy does. Astronomy deals with the entire universe, in all its grandeur and richness. Who can look at the seemingly countless stars

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Author name: Stanley Yen
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Kids: Me and My Time Machine

Mar 29 2005 10:50 AM | Guest in Kids

"The star you are looking at is called Altair, it's just a point of light because it is so far from Earth. The distance is so great the Astronomers use what is called a light year to measure distances. A light year is the distance a beam of light travels in one year.

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Author name: Kevin Harris
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Kids: New Skies for Young Eyes

Mar 29 2005 10:51 AM | Guest in Kids

Right away show them something of interest and tell them something interesting: I swing the telescope to the double star Alberio in the constellation Cygnus and ask the children if they had ever really looked closely at the stars. "Did you know that the stars are different colors and that many of them are double or revolve around

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Author name: Ray Natera
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