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Astronomical Filters Archives

Zhumell SEE IT ALL Telescope Filter Set

Dec 28 2009 12:00 PM | Lord Beowulf in Astronomical Filters

The Zhumell SEE IT ALL Telescope Filter Set consists of four filters, a Sky-Glow filter, a UHC (Ultra High Contrast) filter, an O-III filter, and a

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Author name: Michael Foegelle
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Orion 1.25" Variable Polarizing Telescope Filter

Dec 29 2009 06:41 AM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

The Orion Variable Polarizing Filter makes viewing the moon a more pleasurable experience. Unlike a neutral density filter that

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Author name: Paul Griffin
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Baader Neodymium Moon and Skyglow Filter

Dec 17 2009 07:35 AM | Robert Piekiel in Astronomical Filters

Like it’s name suggests, this filter also helps the view of deep-sky objects in moonlight, something that other filters

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Author name: Robert Piekiel
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Zhummel See It All Filter Set

Dec 11 2009 11:15 AM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

The first thing I looked at was Jupiter with my 2" 30 mm eye piece which provides 50X power. . First I looked at it with

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Author name: Williard Champagne
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Astronomik LRGB Type IIc Filters

Dec 11 2009 07:30 AM | dsnay in Astronomical Filters

I have been using an Astronomik H-a filter for narrowband imaging in my Meade DSI-Pro cameras for over a year. I recently added

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Author name: David Snay
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Lab Test and First Light Report of 2" Zhumell Filter Set

Oct 30 2009 06:15 AM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

My interest in astronomy started when I was 15 and saw Haley¡¯s comet through a pair of Bushnell binos. I had always wanted to buy a telescope but growing up in light and particulate polluted Bombay (now Mumbai), I gave up all notions of pursuing the hobby

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Author name: Shekar Govindaswamy
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Filter Performance Comparisons

Oct 05 2006 06:05 AM | David Knisely in Astronomical Filters

The following is a summary report of visual observations of emission nebulae comparing the performance of various filters intended for such objects.

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Author name: David Knisely
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Orion's 2" OIII Filter

Feb 20 2006 02:50 AM | StarStuff1 in Astronomical Filters

LPR, or Light Pollution Reduction filters block the most common wavelengths of the light glow we often call “light pollution”. Most of this offending light falls in the visible spectrum from 550 to 630 nanometers. LPR

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Author name: Terry Alford
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Mars Filter Comparison

Nov 18 2005 02:25 AM | square_peg in Astronomical Filters

The following is taken from a post in the beginners forum based on an observing report on the morning of 09-08-05

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Author name: Tom Allyn
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Binoscope Company Narrow and Broadband Nebula Filters

Mar 09 2005 01:31 PM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

I have been wanting an 2” 03 filter for sometime now but have not been able to afford one. When Joe Castoro came out with a 2” one for $135 I became interested.

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Author name: John Kagey
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Baader Fringe Killer Filter

Mar 09 2005 03:55 PM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

Santa sent me a new skywatcher 80/400 achromat refractor and as I knew it before Christmas, I took informations about it, and about the fact that it suffers from secondary color as it's not an APO. So I decided to go for a filter to reduce this secondary color.

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Author name: Peter Franquet
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Sirius Optics Variable Filter System (VFS)

Mar 12 2005 05:16 PM | Sol Robbins in Astronomical Filters

The Variable Filter System, or VFS, is a unique form of interference filter. The filter's glass has coatings deposited on one side of its surface and is unlike died colored glass absorption filters. This method of filtration rejects most incoming light while allowing a very high transmission of light through three thin bandwidths or peaks to come through the eyepiece. What makes it unique is that all three bandwidths are "variable" and move in unison.

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Author name: Sol Robbins
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Astrocrumb Filter Slide

Mar 09 2005 10:50 AM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

With a slide, using a filter becomes second-nature, as effortless as focusing.

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Author name: Michael P. Deneen
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Orion V-Block Filter

Mar 11 2005 11:57 AM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

Two of my current scopes are achromats. I purchased a 1.25" version of the Orion V-Block filter to try on them. The filter is advertised as a way to cut down chromatic aberration effects, such a colorful halo, and edge color, in an achromat.

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Author name: Jay Moynihan
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Sirius Optics NPC Neodymium Eyepiece Filter

Mar 10 2005 01:38 PM | David Knisely in Astronomical Filters

Although color filters generally do have some limited applications for planetary viewing in bringing out certain detail, I have never a huge fan of them. I only have a light red filter for the dark markings of Mars and a pale blue one (Lumicon Deep-sky) for Jupiter and the Martian clouds and polar caps. Neither filter gets much use, and I have been somewhat skeptical that any filter could be produced which would be of much value to me for the planets. However, recently a new filter has come out which has dramatically changed my opinion of filtered viewing; the NPC Neodymium Eyepiece Filter from Sirius Optics.

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Author name: David Knisely
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Zeiss Filters

Mar 12 2005 05:18 PM | Gary BEAL in Astronomical Filters

I have been thinking for some time now to share my experiences with the selection of filters designed and manufactured by Zeiss. It has taken some years to acquire these filters, and while not a prolific filter user it is nice to get them out and give them some fresh air every now and then. They are all designed for the Zeiss

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Author name: Gary Beal
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Sirius Optics MV-20 Chromatic Aberration Suppression Filter

Mar 27 2005 12:56 PM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

The MV-1 (minus-violet) eyepiece filter, developed by Al Misiuk of Sirius Optics, has been available for some time now and has gained significant popularity due to it's ability to remove the appearance of virtually all spurious color from achromatic refractors. Although the MV-1 achieves its purpose, it does impart a slight yellowish cast to objects that are viewed. It's not a perfect world. Or is it? Al has now produced a new generation minus-violet filter called the MV-20. It removes a significant amount of the annoying violet glow seen when viewing bright celestial objects through achromats, while still yielding a relatively natural color appearance to the objects with virtually no yellowish cast. Some time ago, I sent a refractor lens to Sirius Optics for MV-1 coating. After a few phone conversations with Al, he mentioned his new MV-20 filter. I acquired mine through him, but Sirius does not generally sell directly to the public. Several dealers, however, are listed on the Sirius website (www.siriusoptics.com). The MV-20 is still relatively new, and many of the dealers may not yet have it on their websites, so you may have to call and ask. Just to get a few things straight, this is still merely an

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Author name: Tony Cannata
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Sirius Optics MV-20 Chromatic Aberration Suppression Filter

Mar 10 2005 01:35 PM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

The MV-20 is still relatively new, and many of the dealers may not yet have it on their websites, so you may have to call and ask. Just to get a few things straight, this is still merely an eyepiece filter. It prevents certain wavelengths of light from passing through the eyepiece to your eye. It does not refocus light like a Chromacor lens does. The two principles are very different. The MV-20 will not turn an achromat into an apochromat. It will, however, reduce the visual appearance of 80-90% of chromatic aberration without unduly altering the natural appearance of planets and stars and without costing an arm and a leg.

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Author name: Tony Cannata
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Useful Filters for Viewing Deep-Sky Objects

Mar 12 2005 10:40 AM | David Knisely in Astronomical Filters

The broad-band "Light-pollution Reduction (LPR) filters are designed to improve the visibility of a variety of Deep-Sky objects by blocking out the common Mercury vapor, Sodium, and some other emission lines from man-made or natural sources which contribute to light pollution, while letting through a broad range of other more useful wavelengths. Since the eye is mainly a "contrast detector", this selective screening out of some of the background skyglow increases the contrast and helps Deep-sky objects stand out more noticably.

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Author name: David Knisely
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Sirius Optics Minus Violet Filter

Mar 12 2005 11:10 AM | Guest in Astronomical Filters

Over the past year there has been some serious debate within the achromatic refractor community as to how to deal with false color. One company has proposed an apochromatic lens system to completely correct an achromatic telescope. Al Misiuk at Sirius Optics on the other hand decided to create a simple filter to remove excess violet from the image produced by a conventional achromatic refractor.

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Author name: Curt Irwin
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Lumicon Multiple Filter Selector

Mar 12 2005 11:16 AM | David Knisely in Astronomical Filters

For those of us who have more than one filter in our equipment arsenal, it is frequently a hastle (and even a hazard) to keep screwing, unscrewing, or even handling small 1.25" eyepiece filters, especially in the dark. Enter the Lumicon Multiple Filter Selector, a filter holder and selector for up to 5 Lumicon filters (or other low-profile filters with similar threads) at once for instant access at the eyepiece while viewing. In this way, the right filter for any object can be moved into place without looking away from the eyepiece, or fumbling in the dark for each filter. While this is potentially a great convenience for the observer, it comes at a price, both financial and logistical.

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Author name: David Knisely
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Baader Planeterium Moon & Skyglow Filter

Mar 12 2005 11:27 AM | Dave Novoselsky in Astronomical Filters

Markus just sent me a rather interesting item on the basis of, "test it, and if you like it, keep it and send me a check. If you don't like it, send it back to me." The sheet that accompanied the small box says this is a "BAADER PLANETARIUM MOON & SKYGLOW FILTER." The literature says that it is a 1.25" filter designed to thread into a standard 1.25" eyepiece and "not a simple colored filter" but a "selective contrast filter" intended to block "in the visual spectral ranges" light from sky and street lighting. It is also said to increase contrast on lunar and planetary observing but preserve "bright-dark contrast." Markus said that, unlike most color filters, this filter is optical glass, not simple colored glass, and has "flat-parallel polished surfaces."

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Author name: David A. Novoselsky
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Baader Planeterium Moon & Skyglow Filter

Mar 12 2005 05:20 PM | Dave Novoselsky in Astronomical Filters

Markus just sent me a rather interesting item on the basis of, "test it, and if you like it, keep it and send me a check. If you don't like it, send it back to me." The sheet that accompanied the small box says this is a "BAADER PLANETARIUM MOON & SKYGLOW FILTER." The literature says that it is a 1.25" filter designed to thread into a standard 1.25" eyepiece and "not a simple colored filter" but a "selective contrast filter" intended to block "in the visual spectral ranges" light from sky and street lighting. It is also said to increase contrast on lunar and planetary observing but preserve "bright-dark contrast." Markus said that, unlike most color filters, this filter is optical glass, not simple colored glass, and has "flat-parallel polished surfaces."

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Author name: David A. Novoselsky
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Sirius Optics Variable Filter System (VFS)

Mar 29 2005 03:33 AM | Sol Robbins in Astronomical Filters

This is one nice little piece of equipment. It has a simple and elegant design. It is anodized aluminum with a flat black finish. This housing has 1.25" in-out barrels and can only be used with 1.25" eyepieces. It feels like it weighs about half a pound. There is also a really nice red engraved plate. Fortunately, it is a lot easier to use than it is to describe. As you can see in the photo, a portion of the filter protrudes from the housing. The filter's diameter is about 3". The wheel's edge that protrudes from the housing is numbered for use as a reference. The filter spins around using your finger at this location. Just rotate the wheel and watch the filter vary the renditions on a given object seen at the eyepiece. I simply rotated the filter wheel without regard to the numerical scale, as I was interested in all the possibilities that the VFS has. Since the wheel rotates so smoothly, it was easily to go back and forth while observing.

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Author name: Sol Robbins
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Baader Planeterium Moon & Skyglow Filter

Mar 29 2005 03:34 AM | Dave Novoselsky in Astronomical Filters

Markus just sent me a rather interesting item on the basis of, "test it, and if you like it, keep it and send me a check. If you don't like it, send it back to me." The sheet that accompanied the small box says this is a "BAADER PLANETARIUM MOON & SKYGLOW FILTER." The literature says that it is a 1.25" filter designed to thread into a standard 1.25" eyepiece and "not a simple colored filter" but a "selective contrast filter" intended to block "in the visual spectral ranges" light from sky and street lighting. It is also said to increase contrast on lunar and planetary observing but preserve "bright-dark contrast." Markus said that, unlike most color filters, this filter is optical glass, not simple colored glass, and has "flat-parallel polished surfaces."

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Author name: David A. Novoselsky
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