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#26 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 15 July 2003 - 05:52 PM

Shadows,
There are an awful lot of nice 8"Celestron schmidtcassegrains on the used market as well, consider an 8" schmidt also, they are VERY portable. I have one and with a set of Bobs knobs to collimate it in the field it has become my favorite deep sky grab N go scope, and I have an APO refractor I could be using instead! BUT aperature does prevail on fuzzys! My.02 Something

#27 Ron B[ee]

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Posted 15 July 2003 - 06:00 PM

I have an APO refractor I could be using instead! BUT aperature does prevail on fuzzys!



Most indubitably :cool:.

Ron B[ee]


#28 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 20 July 2003 - 10:03 PM

Shadow,
When I finally decided to purchase a scope I had a simular problem. I had used binoculars for years but I knew no one to ask about scopes and there were only department stores around my location. This forum would have been a great help and it is good that you found it. You will probably get more info than you need but you are already learning that everyone has an opinion. The only advice I have to offer is that I am not sure there is a single scope that meets all needs. What you are going to use it for and how you will use it will eventually lead you to the right scope for you. I use a Celestron 8" SCT as my primary scope and it works very well for deep sky and fairly well for planets. It is also light enought to move to the yard or to a remote site. An SCT has a bigger problem dealing with light pollution than a refractor but it will work fairly well in either location. I have a slightly different perspective on Go To technology than what has been stated. The satisfaction of finding an object by star hoping has to be weighed against the frustration level. You will learn how to find objects on your own with experience. Finding them when you have no experience can be a challange. I have used an EQ mount, alt - Az and a go to system. Yes, it rewarding to find an object with my EQ mount after searching for a long time. It is also frustrating when you know it is there and you cannot find it. I can see more objects using my Celestron Nexstar system in one night than I can with a manual system in five nights. The looking not the searching is the part I enjoy. I think a Nexstar SCT is not a bad system to consider as a first scope. The beauty of the system is that you do not have to know the sky to find objects and for the money they do a good job. I have never used a Meade go to so I cannot comment on that brand. I also point out that I can clearly see the rings of Saturn and the two main belts of Jupiter with a 70MM Tele Vue ranger with only medium power eyepieces, so something is wrong with your equipment. The suggestion about isolating the diagional is a good one to try to figure out the problem.

#29 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 24 July 2003 - 10:38 AM

Hi Shadows --

Of the 3 scopes you listed, I think I'd go for the 6LT. It has the largest aperture (good for deep sky things), and the long focal length should let it do well on planets. You'd have to learn how to collimate the telescope, though (but that's easy). I think my second choice would be the 127 Mak -- great portability, good on targets that you could see from suburbia. In fact, I'm thinking of getting one down the road! (But I think I'd get a big Dobsonian reflector first).

I just bought a scope from Orion too -- the 120mm Skyview Pro f/8.3 refractor. I view mainly from my backyard, so I wanted something that would be good on planets. But, the 120mm clear aperture should make it reasonable for deep sky objects when I can get to a dark site. And, I think it has great contrast -- very sharp on the moon. It's a great scope -- but, it's awkward to view things that are near zenith (almost straight up). You might consider it too -- it's in the same price range as the others you've mentioned.

Thanks for giving me yet another reason to spend time and drool over telescope ads! :lol:

Best of luck, and clear skies!

Albert

Oh -- one last thing -- the 6LT has the best mount of the three, especially if you like to tinker and you tune it up.


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