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New Big Bino Head

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#1 Craig Simmons

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Posted 23 July 2004 - 10:10 AM

I found this at Scopestuff. I'm tempted to get this for one of my P-mounts.

http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_binm.htm

Anyone seen anything else comparable?

#2 Tom L

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Posted 23 July 2004 - 10:34 AM

That's a nice looking mount for more than just large binocs!

#3 EdZ

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Posted 23 July 2004 - 10:49 AM

I was ready to jump on this as soon as I saw it.

Then I thought about a couple of things:

It mounts to a 1/4x20 tripod screw. If I remove the head from any of my Bogen tripods, the screw is 3/8". I own seven tripods, not including surveyor type. The only tripods I own that have a 1/4" screw on the top of the center post under the head are my Orion Paragon HD-F2, my Smith-Victor (Paragon HXD look-alike) and my Slik U212. They are rated for only about 4# to 8# each.

You could mount it to the 1/4x20 screw on the existing tripod head, but then the 20# load capacity is defeated. The load would be determined by the existing head, not this head. Even the 501 head is only rated for 13#.

If you DO mount this to the screw on top of the center post, and the tripod has a crank center post, you would not have any motion to swing left/right. If the tripod has a slip center post (like the 3211 or 3011), you could loosen the center post lock and turn the center post and relock. No fluid motion left/right.

Looks like the only effective way to use this thing is to mount it to the top of an existing tripod head. In which case the claimed 20# load capacity could never be used, unless you already have a very substantial tripod and head.

You could probably get it to work on a home made P mount.

So, I don't know of any tripod that has a 1/4x20 center post top screw that would be capable of carrying a 20# load. I would think twice about putting a 20# load (or even a 10# load) on this thing with it attached by only a 1/4x20 screw.

edz

#4 KennyJ

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Posted 23 July 2004 - 02:10 PM

Well pointed out Prof. Ed !

Get on with your packing now :-)

Happy Camping , Kenny.

#5 btschumy

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Posted 23 July 2004 - 02:26 PM

I would think twice about putting a 20# load (or even a 10# load) on this thing with it attached by only a 1/4x20 screw.

edz


But don't your binoculars already attach to your head with a 1/4x20 bolt? If so why are you concerned about this one being strong enough.

You point about tripods capable of carrying this load most likely having a 3/8 inch bolt is true. However, I bet you could easily re-tap the mount to accept a 3/8 inch bolt. I know the person that runs ScopeStuff and he's very helpful. Call or email him about the bolt size issue.

#6 sftonkin

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Posted 24 July 2004 - 01:42 AM

My first thought on seeing it was "poor-man's TelePod". Without the TelePod's "slant", altitude is going to be severely limited.

Bill, Ed's point re ¼" thread is very valid -- there is a distinction between a ¼" thread for a binocular and a ¼" mount for a binocular and mount -- in the latter case, the moment on the ¼" thread is very much greater.

While we're on the subject of mounts, this one looks quite good:
http://www.teleskop-...oramamontierung

Not nearly as inexpensive as the ScopeStuff kit (the TS one is approximately the same price as the TelePod on this side of the pond. I'd prefer it as I am emotionally attached to the notion of counterweighting as opposed to cantilevering. ;)

#7 Craig Simmons

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Posted 24 July 2004 - 07:20 AM

Stephen, thanks for the link to the mounts. Interesting design with the built-in counterweight feature.

Giant Binos and head would be a pretty good load on a 1/4-20. I suppose a bolt of stronger metal could hold the binos and head without failing.

#8 Rusty

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Posted 25 July 2004 - 12:07 AM

I see no reason the 1/4"x20 hole couldn't be drilled out and tapped to accept 3/8x?.

And as far as the 1/4"x20 not being able to handle the weight, I respectfully disagree. Shear on that would be at least several hundred pounds. Since the binocs are expected to be balanced, there's little torsional load, and very little shear. Slewing in azimuth directly on the center post is a legitmate concern, but careful torquing of the nut (use a self-locking, of course) should minimize that.

But I agree with EdZ, that this looks good, but may not be worth the additional effort required. I have two Quickset Samsons I bought with head for $100 each...40# capacity.

However, putting this mount on a tripod head for elevation and using the head's azimuth ability has an appeal to me. :question:

#9 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 25 July 2004 - 06:19 AM

Isn't this mount primarily for terrestrial use?
It looks to me as if the binocular barrels will hit the mount long before you can reach zenith.

#10 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 07:35 AM

Very interesting counter weight system. Never seen that design before.


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