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List of Paracorr settings for all brands of EP's

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#126 Starman1

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Posted 01 May 2011 - 04:28 PM

Don, I was thinking about this process.

Does this take into account the varying amount of in-focus required between dissimilar EPs?

I have the Type 2, not used it yet.
I figure I can calibrate it with either the Radian 14, or the Panoptic 27.

It just seems to me that an EP with a different point of focus would require prime focus set first, then coma adjustment with the tunable top.

Or... I'm not yet understanding how it works.. :shrug:

The Paracorr's lens sits in the scope's light cone at a certain, distinctive, position, relative to the focal plane for it to correct coma correctly.

Likewise, the distance between the focal plane of the eyepiece and the Paracorr lens has to be a certain distance for the eyepiece to be able to focus on the coma-corrected focal plane of the scope + Paracorr.

That's why there can be a new focuser that incorporates a Paracorr lens. The lens is fixed relative to the telescope's light cone, and the eyepiece is adjusted in and out (using the focuser) until it comes to focus.

This is essentially what happens when you set the Paracorr for a known eyepiece and focus. You're putting the Paracorr at the correct distance from the focus of the scope and adjusting the tunable top to put that eyepiece at the right distance from the lens. When you adjust the tunable top (which has 7/8" of an inch of adjustment not counting the extra height of the 1.25" adapter), you are essentially doing what the person with the paracorr-in-focuser is doing, which is adjusting the distance between the focal plane of the eyepiece and the lens of the Paracorr.

Now, not every eyepiece will fall into the range of motion on the Paracorr's tunable top. Some 2" eyepieces might need an extension tube to get them far enough away from the lens (as would, for instance, an 8 Ethos used as a 2" eyepiece), and, conceivably, there could be an eyepiece that needed to get closer than the in-most setting.

But the range should be sufficient for most eyepieces.

Since focusing with an eyepiece of known setting has placed the Paracorr lens relative to the focus of the scope, you can dial in any other eyepiece by simply adjusting the tunable top to focus, leaving the Paracorr where it is by not using the focuser (which would move the Paracorr's lenses relative to the scope). So fixing the Paracorr lens using a known eyepiece and then focusing a new eyepiece by using the tunable top simply finds that new eyepiece's correct Paracorr setting, i.e. adjusts the correct distance from eyepiece focal plane to Paracorr lens.

#127 Sean Puett

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:03 PM

so if i have this right, you focus your first2 inch eye piece in the paracorr, adjust settings until best correction, re focus, then switch eyepieces and only adjust the paracorr. then for 1.25 eyepieces you start from the beginning again and do the same thing. i just got my paracorr and haven't been able to try it yet. i have all but one of the ES 82s so i will list them when i get them right. they are well corrected at f4.9 with just minor coma at the edge so i am expecting a lot from this paracorr. if they are not coma free, i will be disappointed.

#128 Sarkikos

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:45 PM

My understanding is that it does not matter if you prime the Paracorr with a 1.25" Televue or a 2" Televue, as long as you know the prescribed setting for the TV eyepiece. For a 1.25" TV eyepiece, I would use the 1.25"-2" adapter that came with the Paracorr. What you are doing is finding the correct Paracorr lens cell position within the focuser, given the setting for a TV eyepiece per Televue. Then you keep the focuser at that position and use the Tunable Top to determine the best setting for a nonTV eyepiece by seeing where it comes to best focus.

It doesn't matter if you are finding the setting for a 2" or 1.25" nonTV eyepiece. Just keep track of the specific 1.25"-2" adapter or 2" extension or spacing ring or visual back or whatever that you are using when you focus the Tunable Top to determine the setting for that eyepiece. That way you can be sure to set up the eyepiece correctly the next time you insert it in the Paracorr. Some trial and error is obviously involved, more for some eyepieces than for others.

Mike

#129 Sean Puett

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 01:29 PM

thanks. this was my first TV purchase and i like the feel/build quality. i may even buy an ethos when they release the 120deg afov eyepieces. :-)

#130 star drop

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 11:14 AM

Televue 32mm Widefield setting 1.

#131 bgavin

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 12:57 PM

I've been using the Type-II a lot the last couple of weeks.
One of the startling things is how MUCH change occurs with small movements of the tunable top.

Q: is there any merit in using a TV eyepiece with a focal length closest to the EP under test?

For example, I want to adjust for an ES82 14mm.
I can use a Radian 14mm or a Panoptic 27mm.

Logic tells me to use the Radian for the ES14, and use the Pan27 to calibrate for my 27mm Flat Field, etc.

#132 Sarkikos

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 01:23 PM

I have no choice. My TV Plossl 25mm is the only TV eyepiece that I own. That will be my priming eyepiece.

I've been waiting for a night around Full Moon to collect the settings for my other eyepieces, or at least for the ones I use the most. I can do that beside my house here in red zone suburbia. But the weather hasn't cooperated. I don't want to waste a night at my dark site fiddling with equipment settings. That would not make sense, IMHO. (Though I've seen others do it many times. :ohmy:)

I don't even want to fool around with gathering techie gizmo settings if the Moon's between New and Full, or there's a planet up that I can observe. I like to observe the Moon, planets and DSO. And taking into account the general bad weather this spring, that does narrow down my chances of getting any settings any time soon.

I guess I'll just have to sacrifice a perfectly good observing night on nerdy techie gizmo stuff.

:crazy:
Mike

#133 bgavin

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 01:29 PM

Mike, I've been watching around for a 20mm TV Plossl, just for fun. EdZ is seriously impressed, and I kinda wanted one anyway..

My Type-II is mostly living in my scope full time.
However... the TV 1.8x Barlow is not compatible due to physical contact.
I'm not enamored of Barlows/Powermates (yet), so no big deal.

I'm stoked over putting a single 2" filter in the Type-II for lunar. Geez Louise.. does that get bright in 10".
I have the variable polarizer, now thinking a fixed ND might be more useful, less fiddling.

My Type-II was purchased to do double duty with System 2.4 imaging screwed directly to the Paracorr optics.
I'm glad it was on sale... pricey.

#134 Sarkikos

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 01:52 PM

Bruce,

Mike, I've been watching around for a 20mm TV Plossl, just for fun. EdZ is seriously impressed, and I kinda wanted one anyway..


I sorta wished you'd told me that in a PM ... :grin:

My Type-II is mostly living in my scope full time. However... the TV 1.8x Barlow is not compatible due to physical contact.
I'm not enamored of Barlows/Powermates (yet), so no big deal.


I have a series of Barlows, but I hardly use them anymore. If I binoview lunar/planets, I screw on a 1.9x or 3x OCS so the eyepieces will come to focus. Without the binoviewer I just slip in a simple Ortho, RKE or Brandon. Particulary for faint fuzzies, I try to avoid adding to the glass in the path, though the Paracorr will immediately contradict that principle, of course. On the other hand, I think I will experiment with my ES 100 deg 9mm + 1.5x lens assembly + Paracorr, if that is possible. That combo, if it works, would be particularly good for bright planets or the Moon.

Mike

#135 Starman1

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 02:06 PM

Mike,
I found the optimum sequence to be:
eyepiece>>Paracorr>>Barlow or PowerMate.
It would seem to me that if a barlow was in between the eyepiece and Paracorr that the proper setting of the Paracorr top would have to be redetermined, and might exceed the range of adjustment.
Whereas if the barlow is in front of the Paracorr, refocusing would be necessary, but probably not the eyepiece--Paracorr setting.

#136 bgavin

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 03:23 PM

A bit OT, but my best use for a 2.5x Powermate is prime focus DSLR photography.
The Type-II provides is a direct attach for unmagnified prime focus using a TV T-ring plus Nikon T-adapter.

My initial testing of TV 1.8x and 2.5x shows image degradation, Type-II not installed.

To do the Powermate + Paracorr thing, I'd need a 2" PowerMate ($$) so I could be disappointed on a more expensive scale.

#137 Sarkikos

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 05:59 PM

Don,

Mike,
I found the optimum sequence to be:
eyepiece>>Paracorr>>Barlow or PowerMate.
It would seem to me that if a barlow was in between the eyepiece and Paracorr that the proper setting of the Paracorr top would have to be redetermined, and might exceed the range of adjustment.
Whereas if the barlow is in front of the Paracorr, refocusing would be necessary, but probably not the eyepiece--Paracorr setting.


Yes, that sounds right. I'll have to remember to try the setup that way. In fact, I think you mentioned this in a thread, and probably to me! So many gizmos, so little time...

I think the best method for my purposes would be to screw a 2" Barlow lens assembly onto the end of the Paracorr, insert the TV Plossl 25mm, tune it to setting "4", and find best focus using the focuser. Next lock the focuser at that position and replace the TV eyepiece with the ES 100 9mm (or another eyepiece). Then use the tunable top to find best focus for that eyepiece. There may be a fudge factor involved because of the height of the 1.25-2" adapter, but this should get me close.

There is a chance a particular eyepiece will not come to focus this way, but it's worth a try. I have two different visual backs (or whatever) to attach to the top of the focuser - one very short, one tall. One or the other might work.

Mike

#138 Sarkikos

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 06:09 PM

Bruce,

I'm stoked over putting a single 2" filter in the Type-II for lunar. Geez Louise.. does that get bright in 10".
I have the variable polarizer, now thinking a fixed ND might be more useful, less fiddling.

My Type-II was purchased to do double duty with System 2.4 imaging screwed directly to the Paracorr optics.
I'm glad it was on sale... pricey.


If you want to use the VP, you could screw one filter onto the Paracorr and put the other on the end of your eyepiece. Then just turn the eyepiece to adjust the brightness of the image. Make sure the filter isn't deep enough to scratch the top lens of the Paracorr, though.

I've tried VPs. I didn't like them. They seemed to degrade the image more than a single filter, such as an ND. For my 10" Newt, I like to use a 47 Violet or a 25 Red. Also, an apodizing mask will cut down the brightness and make eye floaters much less noticeable. But it's anathema to observe the Moon with an apodizing mask, so forget I even mentioned it.

:grin:
Mike

#139 bgavin

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 08:14 PM

If you want to use the VP, you could screw one filter onto the Paracorr and put the other on the end of your eyepiece. Then just turn the eyepiece to adjust the brightness of the image.

What a grand idea. :bow:

I have two sets of VP, 1.25" and 2". Mix 'n match would let this work on both EP sizes.

The Paracorr lets me place a 2" filter in the bottom, which makes changing EP a fast and easy process UHC filters, etc.

#140 Sarkikos

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 08:54 PM

Bruce,

I have two sets of VP, 1.25" and 2". Mix 'n match would let this work on both EP sizes.


Yep, that would do the trick. I might take my VPs out and try them again when I get around to acquiring all those Paracorr settings. The Moon close to Full would make a nice easy target.

What I will probably do, also, is screw my 2" Semi-Apo filter onto the Paracorr and try different color filters on the eyepiece while I'm looking at Jupiter when it's better positioned. I've found that a Semi-Apo or Moon & SkyGlow combined with various color filters will improve contrast and bring out various features when observing bright planets. I'd rather use a filter wheel, but I don't have much hope of that working with a Paracorr.

Mike

#141 bgavin

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 11:01 PM

OPT has a nice deal going on the Televue TRG-1072 t-ring adapter for the Type-II Paracorr.
I try to support our sponsor, but they are $10 higher for the shipped item.

This adapter screws directly to the Type-II optical assembly when the tunable top is removed. It presents a standard T-Ring thread which mates with my Nikon T-adapter.

As it turns out, the Nikon sensor distance + T-ring + TRG-1072 is almost the perfect back focus distance.
The native prime focus (no Powermate) calculates as pretty close to the FOV seen by the Pan27 on my scope.

I already have the Powermate PTR-1250 adapter that mates the 1.25" Powermates to standard t-adapters.
This is surprising high magnification, so I'm thinking the unamplified prime focus might be more useful.
Either way, I get the full benefit of the Type-II optics for the final image.

Overall, the Type-II really impresses me with its very high quality construction and workmanship.
The TV gear is definitely worth the extra $$.

I run the Pan27 at the recommended setting, and the views are just fabulous.. all the way to the edge.

#142 rprice

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 02:48 PM

I posted this to a thread in the reflector section but I will repeat it here as this seems a more appropriate place.

I have seen a few posts from time to time asking what the Paracorr setting is for a particular eyepiece, and of course there is the lead post at the top of this section on Paracorr settings for different brands of eyepieces. However, the Paracorrs are easy to setup or calibrate on any scope and you can determine the correct setting for any eyepiece easily yourself - and you do not need a Televue eyepiece to do it.

The Paracorr is designed to be placed in the scope's light path at a position that achieves a specific distance from the Paracorr's last lens vertex to the focal plane; this is often called bfl or back focal length. The Paracorr is setup in your scope just as if you were going to do imaging with a camera or CCD; instead of placing a sensor at the focal plane you simply look at the focal plane with an eyepiece.

This specific distance is defined in the Televue literature several places. It is listed as 55 or 56 mm +/-4 mm for the PC1 and 55 or 57mm for the PC2. The tolerance of +/- 4 mm is generous so lets just say its 56 mm (2.20").

So, find a plastic soda straw or swizzel stick and make a mark on the side of the straw with a pen or sharpie 56mm (2.20") from one end. Loosen the hold down screw for the tunable top and place the PC on a table with its axis vertical. Carefully place the end of the straw or stick into the PC until the end just touches the center of the last lens. Adjust the tunable top until its top surface is even with the mark that you made on the straw. A flat item, such as a short plastic ruler laid across the top of the tunable top makes this easy.

Your PC is now calibrated to have the focal plane coincident with the top of the tunable top. Now all you do is place a strip of Scotch Magic tape (or other translucent cellophane tape) across the top of the tunable top; make sure the tape is taught, not sagging across the top. Put the PC in your scope, line up on a bright star and move the focuser until the star is sharply focused on the tape. Then, lock the focuser, or be sure to not touch the focuser knob.

You are all set to find the PC setting for any eyepiece - just put in your eyepiece and adjust the tunable top (not the focuser knob) until a star is focussed and record the setting. Repeat for any other eyepieces in question. Keep in mind that there is no guarantee that the PC will be able to focus your eyepiece, especially the older PC1. Many eyepieces (especially 1.25" ones) need more "in" travel to be properly set; you may need to find a different 2" to 1.25" adapter than the one that came with the PC1 with a thinner flange to allow the eyepiece to go further into the PC. I had to machine a special thin flange adapter to allow several of my eyepieces to focus.

But let's go back a few steps and look at the position of the tunable top after we calibrated it with our plastic straw "gauge". You will likely find that the PC1 tunable top is set right at or very close to the middle (3) mark; if you did the calibration on a PC2 you will find that the tunable top is set at the middle or "E" position. This is no coincidence. The older PC1 literature did not say much but the new PC2 literature shows clearly that the focal plane of the telescope is located at the top of the tunable top when at the "E" position without the 1.25" adapter, and the focal plane is located at the top of the inserted 1.25" adapter when at the "A" position.

So you do not even have to go through the "calibration" steps using the plastic straw we discussed above, unless you just want to prove it to yourself. Simply set the PC as follows:

PC1 - "3" setting (middle position)
PC2 - "E" setting for 2" mode
PC2 - "A" setting for 1 1/4" mode

Put the magic tape across the top, focus a star on the tape and you are ready to go as described above. Use your straw or stick to enjoy your favorite beverage....

Clear skies,

Ron
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#143 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 10:42 AM

Ron,

Thanks for the info. I have the PC1. If I were to use setting "3" and a piece of clear tape to set the focal position of my scope, should I take off the 1.25"-2" adapter? Should I place the tape directly over the top of the Paracorr without the adapter? That's what I would think, but I like to remove all ambiguity.

Also, if anyone were to go through the calibration process, they should use a Q-tip or something similar that has a soft end rather than a straw, to avoid scratching the Paracor lens.

It is true that there are many 1.25" eyepieces that will not come to focus in the PC1. I just tried to determine the Paracorr settings for eleven 1.25" eyepieces. Seven out of eleven eyepieces would not come to focus. There was not enough in-focus. I was using the TV 1.25"-2" adapter that comes with the PC1. I might try other adapters.

I'm definitely not buying the PC2. Forgetaboutit. I'm either going to make the PC1 work for me or I'm going to sell it. So far this gizmo is not worth all the trouble.

Mike

#144 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 10:54 AM

Last night I went to a dark site. The predictions on three different websites were for a clear sky. Wrong! The sky was cloudy all night. But I could see some bright stars. So the night would not be a total waste, I took out my PC1 and started determining settings for some of my eyepieces. For all these eyepieces I used the 1.25"-2" adapter supplied with the PC1.

Here are the results:

ES 4.7 82deg: 5 (This matches thewheel's finding.)

Meade 5k UWA 6.7: Not enough in focus

Vixen LVW 8: Not enough in focus

AT Paradigm Dual ED 12: Not enough in focus

ES 14 82deg: 5

Faworski Super Abbe Ortho 16.8: Not enough in focus

Orion Epic ED-2 22: Not enough in focus

Meade 5k SWA 24: Not enough in focus

UO Abbe Ortho 25: 2.75

Brandon 32mm: 3.75

Baader Mark-II Zoom (1.25" mode): Not enough in focus

Mike

#145 star drop

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 12:49 PM

The Paracorr 2/1.25" adapter has a thick flange. I have an adapter that came with my Tectron telescope that has a ~1/32" flange. Using something like that might give you ~3/8" more in focus.

#146 Starman1

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 01:24 PM

And AstroSystems has an adapter on their website that actually allows the eyepiece to drop BELOW the lip by 1/2".
So, depending on which adapter is used, you should be able to achieve enough inward movement of the tunable top for most 1.25" eyepieces.
2" eyepieces? Well, it depends. I think that the 31 Nagler and 21 and 17 Ethos eyepieces, which necessitate a setting lower than the lowest setting on the Paracorr 1, were, in addition to the shorter f/ratios becoming more common, a reason for the creation of the Paracorr 2, which has lower settings than the Paracorr 1.
For 1.25" eyepieces, though, various adapters seem to suffice.
Most 1.25" eyepieces use setting 4, some use setting 5, but if the tunable top needs to go lower than setting 5, a shorter adapter is all you can do. And if that's still not perfect, then use the PC on setting 5. Like the 31 Nagler, it's not going to be perfect, but it will be a lot better than no Paracorr at all.

#147 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 05:33 PM

I have several 1.25"-2" adapters here that I could use. I'll compare them with the TV adapter. Just by a quick glance, I know that my Orion "Precision Centering Adapter" is a little lower than the TV one.

An adapter that allows the eyepiece to drop below the lip by 1/2" seems to be the way to go. I've seen these online, thought about buying one. This will be a good time to do it. I did want to be able to use a wide variety of 1.25" eyepieces with the Paracorr for observing planets. Hopefully the Paracorr will clean up the coma enough to improve my observations of planets even more than I've already been able to do up to now. (Too bad the Paracorr can't be used with a binoviewer.)

Mike

#148 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 06:53 PM

Don,

And AstroSystems has an adapter on their website that actually allows the eyepiece to drop BELOW the lip by 1/2".


I found two of these low profile adapters. One is on the AstroSystems website. They say that their adapter will "lower the profile of your 1.25" eyepiece another 0.5" below the drawtube." $29 + shipping.

Ultra low Eyepiece Adapter - 2" to 1.25"

The other low profile adapter is advertised on the ScopeStuff website. According to ScopeStuff, their "Negative Profile Eyepiece Adapter allows the eyepiece to be inset over 3/4" more than a low profile adapter." $39 including shipping.

Negative Profile Eyepiece Adapter, 1.25" to 2"

I wonder if they are the same adapter, or are essentially the same? I'm tempted to order the ScopeStuff adapter for the extra 1/4" eyepiece inset. However, judging by the two descriptions, AstroSystems and ScopeStuff might measure the amount of extra inset in different ways, so that actually they both may have the same inset?

I'm tempted to go with the ScopeStuff adapter.

Mike

#149 Starman1

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 07:11 PM

Mike,
I think they are essentially the same adapter. One has a 1/2" drop from the lip, and the other has a 3/4" drop from a low-profile adapter (which would typically have about a 1/4" lip).
One caveat: these provide the full drop only with small diameter 1.25" eyepieces. Many 1.25" eyepieces today don't even fit into the recess because the upper sections of the eyepieces are too large. Because there is no screw above the top of the focuser, the upper lip is as thin as they get, so even without fitting into the recess, the adapter is still thinner than most adapters. You'll gain a setting, maybe two, on the Paracorr even if the eyepiece doesn't fit in the recess.

#150 Sarkikos

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 08:07 PM

Don,

My simple, old-school eyepieces such as the Orthos, Brandons, RKEs and Plossls should have no problem fitting into the "well" in the adapter. There may be a problem with already low eye relief getting even lower. But it's definitely worth $30 or so if it will allow many of my 1.25" eyepieces to perform better with the Paracorr.

Mike


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