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How do you transport your LX200?

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 13 August 2003 - 07:26 PM

Well to you amatures on the go, how do you transport your scope and accessories? Do you have a case? hard or soft? Do you have a case/bag for your tripod?

I was looking at a hard case for my soon to be LX200 but they are quit pricey. I saw the soft cases but I want to see how other transport theirs.

aj

#2 Grizz

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 05:49 AM

I put mine back in the original carton with the foam. Throw it in the back of my Jeep and go! (Ok maybe I don't throw it :) ) The tripod just lays in the back the way it is. Everythiung else I put in a nook or cranny.

#3 DaveSchwartz

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 11:49 AM

I have the 12", which is a bit heavier than what your talking about. For storage, it sits on the drive base on a table in the basement. To load it, I point the tube straight up, lock the elevation axis very loosely (just so that the tube doesn't move on its own), grab the fork handles and carry it out looking like a giant phallus (something Freudian about that!). Then I just manouever it through the door and lay it down on the back seat of my 4-door Blazer. I buckle it in with the rear seat belts - one through a fork arm, the other around the tube.

The tripod just lays on its side in the back. My tripod is the Giant model, which is bigger than the one on the 10" (3" legs instead of 2"), and I found it very helpful to make a brace for the legs - a sturdier version of the styrofoam it ships with. I didn't like how the legs sagged and put stress on the top end castings without it. Its a piece of 3/4" particle board cut slightly larger than the diameter of the spreader (11" in my case) and then three equally spaced 'scallops' (circles centred on the edge of the main piece). I place it just at the spot where the bottom castings narrow near the lock knobs and then put a strong rubber bungie (not the elastic kind) just below to hold the whole thing tight. Took only about 1/2 hour to make and now I can carry my tripod horizontally with one hand.

I can post pictures if anyone's interested.

#4 Starman1

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Posted 28 August 2003 - 06:09 PM

AJ,
I transport my 8" LX200 in a soft case, in the back seat, buckled in. The 8" isn't so hard to manoeuver, so I store it in the seat sitting on it's base, with the axes UNLOCKED so as to allow movement and not damage the bearings. I've done this for 10 years with no damage and the scope still tracks perfectly with no vibration.
Don

#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 01 September 2003 - 12:13 AM

I went with the hard case for my (recently acquired) 10" LX200. It comes with its own foam inserts with slots for all the standard goodies. I actually manage to get everything (including a small stepladder for my daughters) into the trunk of a Honda Accord. Of course I don't have much room for anything else in the trunk.

One slight regret with the hardcase is that it is not exactly precision fitted, and requires a bit of manipulation to get the top seated into the bottom before closing the 4 D-ring latches. One side in particular seems to have a "wave" in it, and overall the plastic winds up feeling flimsy, though not in any of the dimensions that are actually important.


#6 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 22 October 2003 - 07:54 AM

I use to transport my 8" LX200 wrapped in a blanket, buckled in between my 2 girls in a geo prism. The Tripod I carried in the trunk in my old navy seabag. Now that I have my surburban I carry it in the origional box, tripod still in my trusty seabag.

#7 Mike28

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Posted 23 October 2003 - 01:54 PM

I purchased a JMI case for my 10"GPS LX200. It's a hardcase with wheels and has inturnal foam (not very soft) that is cutout to fit the scope. It makes it easy to get around althought its somewhat heavy when lifting :crazy: but once on ground easy to pull. I am considering one for my NS11GPS but they are expensive-close to 400.00 for 10" and up :money:.
'my aching back' :lol:
Mike

#8 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 23 October 2003 - 07:08 PM

I have a 10" GPS and I got the Meade soft-carry for it. Then I went to Target and got the large size 2-wheeler luggage carrier. I made a frame (glossing over the details) to set the soft-carry firmly on the 2-wheeler. In retrospect, I had some thoughts that the JMI hard-case made for this scope might have been less bother and, overall, more satisfactory - and ultimately worth the price. However, this scope is now fitted with Guide-Star mounting blocks and a counterweight rail. The soft-carry conforms - the hard case probably would have presented problems. So I have no regrets on this choice. I stow the microfocuser and the finder in a seperate hard case, as I was not happy with putting them in their allotted cubbies in the original foam pack (which is transferred to the soft-carry).

#9 StormKat

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Posted 24 October 2003 - 08:18 AM

I'm saving up for a 10" LX200GPS-SMT. Do any of you really use the finder scope? I would think it's not as useful with goto features.

#10 Echo

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Posted 24 October 2003 - 02:02 PM

Hi,
I haven't had the finder scope mounted for the past year and a half. I do have a telrad and use it a lot. It's helpful to know the sky even if you do have goto, and I often let people doing manual finding look through my telrad to assist in their efforts.

#11 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 06:27 PM

After first using my 10" LX-200 GPS, I realized I would need a right-angle finder, so I retrofitted an Orion which uses just two screws for collimation (kudos, Orion). I also fitted a red-dot finder to the stock Meade finder. I am finding that I use the red-dot sometimes, and the right-angle routinely, and the stock finder only when the position is suitable (not too steep). I always mount it when I set up, and I would not be without it. But I think adding a right-angle finder is a good idea. I also mount a 4" 500 mm rich-field refractor with a 2" diagonal, and the finder on it is another red-dot unit. Even with GOTO, I think you have to have a finder of some kind. Regards -Graham

#12 Steve Saturn

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 11:43 PM

The best tripod transport I've found is hard plastic golf club bag case called a "Golf Guard". It's the perfect size, it has wheels and a handle, and the price is right. I've been using mine for about five years and it goes everywhere my scope and I do.

#13 StormKat

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Posted 03 November 2003 - 09:54 AM

It's things like Steve's "Golf Guard" suggestion that always amazes me. A telescope company will take the exact same product and sell it for $700. Sometimes the proper tool or accessory is in a completely different industry. Always keep your eyes open to the possibilities.
On cloudy nights, I like to build models. Now I could buy special nipper pliers to cut the pieces from the plastic for $29.99 or just go down to Radio Shack and pick up the exact same tool for $4.99. It works in the woodworking industry too. For $59.99 you can get a special rubber mat to lay on your workbench to keep your wood from slipping around while you use a router. Or you could go to KMart and pick up a $5 6 foot roll of the same stuff in the housewares section because housewives use it to line the bottom of drawers.

Simply amazing! Thanks Steve... I think I'll pick up one of those cases. :)

#14 Echo

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Posted 03 November 2003 - 01:08 PM

I use a snowboard bag for my skis in the winter and for my tripod in the summer. Anything specifically for astronomy seems to cost a lot.

#15 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 04 November 2003 - 09:54 AM

I transport it in its origional box. The tripod I carry in my old Seabag from the when I was in the Navy.

Sheridan


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