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Aug07 CN Imaging/Sketching Finals Poll!

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Poll: Aug07 CN Imaging/Sketching Finals Poll! (658 member(s) have cast votes)

Who has our winning image?

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#26 Luna

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 08:42 AM

They're all so wonderful. What a magnificent universe we are part of! :D :bow:
 

#27 aav4bz

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 09:14 AM

These are the hardest yet!!! Jared won my vote, but the sketches always win my heart. Great work from all involved!
 

#28 sky treker123

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 03:36 PM

M 22 globular cluster is very good. so are all the others
 

#29 PhilG

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 03:38 PM

Excellent work everyone. A very tough decision...
 

#30 Jaycin

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 05:26 PM

All are excellent, though the labeling of the sketch is a disaster, with NGC206 identified as the Double Cluster.
Still a great sketch, though.


Don,

I don't mind constructive criticism, but the labeling of my sketch is correct. You might want to take a closer look. The main body of the sketch is a naked eye view of the constellations Andromeda, Cassiopeia, and Perseus. The insets are of M31, and the Double Cluster at 37X. Both of which were naked eye objects that night.

Thanks for the nice comment. :)
 

#31 Jaycin

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 05:47 PM

The sketch of M32, well...I have never been under skies that allow that detailed a view using an 8 inch or even larger. However, I have seen the star cloud on many occasions. But, to be capable of seeing that detail under Florida skies is amazing in itself.


It would seem that some of you are under the impression that my entire sketch is of M31/32/110. I guess I didn't include enough information. As I mentioned to Don, the main body of the sketch is a naked eye view of the constellations Andromeda, Cassiopeia, and Perseus with the Milky Way in the background. The insets are of M31 (and companions), and the Double Cluster, which both appear as small fuzzy patches in the naked eye view. I hope this clears things up a bit. My apologies for the confusion.
 

#32 Olivier Biot

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 06:12 PM

Congrats to the finalists - it was again a very difficult choice to make.

Cheers :bow:

Olivier
 

#33 Asbytec

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 08:49 PM

My apologies, Jay. I thought you sketched a star cloud in M32's outer arm. I never would have imagined someone would have the patients or inclination to sketch the Milky Way itself. (I chuckle silently in delight) I have seen sketches of Orion nebula...I simply don't have the talent required. Have you tried it?

Looking back at your sketch, Jay, it's so obvious that is what you did and I was so wrong. Now, your views are completely consistent with an 8 inch scope. For a moment there, I thought you had CCD chips for eyes. LOL (To see some molting detail in M32.) Best I can do is catch a glimpse of one, maybe two dust lanes, and of course the core and the brighter star cloud(s).) I was laughing to myself, I thought you might have labeled a few Cepheid Variables, as well. :grin:

Again, great sketch...I salute your desire and talent to draw such a celestial site. Look forward to more from you. Hey, try the Sombrero, if you haven't already. It lends itself to good sketching, I believe. But, I wouldn't recommend Omega Centauri...you'll go through too many pencils. :)
 

#34 nNemethon

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 04:00 AM

You peoples make it so hard to choose. I'm thinking of sueing everyone that enters as each time I burn out a few million brain cells. :)

I gave it to Swalker's Venus although it was close. Dean's deep neb was awesome, Jarod's and AstroBobo's were clear and clean, Mike B's was incredibe to say the least, and I can't draw so Jaycin is also in the list.

But for tenacity, that Venus series is mind-blowing which is why I voted for it. To see someone put in that much attention over such a long period is worthy of the vote.

Keep it up all, I look forward to losing many more brain cells in the future! :D

Erik
 

#35 Jaycin

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:01 PM

My apologies, Jay. I thought you sketched a star cloud in M32's outer arm. I never would have imagined someone would have the patients or inclination to sketch the Milky Way itself. (I chuckle silently in delight) I have seen sketches of Orion nebula...I simply don't have the talent required. Have you tried it?

Looking back at your sketch, Jay, it's so obvious that is what you did and I was so wrong. Now, your views are completely consistent with an 8 inch scope. For a moment there, I thought you had CCD chips for eyes. LOL (To see some molting detail in M32.) Best I can do is catch a glimpse of one, maybe two dust lanes, and of course the core and the brighter star cloud(s).) I was laughing to myself, I thought you might have labeled a few Cepheid Variables, as well. :grin:

Again, great sketch...I salute your desire and talent to draw such a celestial site. Look forward to more from you. Hey, try the Sombrero, if you haven't already. It lends itself to good sketching, I believe. But, I wouldn't recommend Omega Centauri...you'll go through too many pencils. :)


No problem Asbytec. At least you didn't refer to my labeling as a "disaster". ;) I'm glad you took the time to give my sketch a closer look and I appreciate the compliments. Sketches don't tend to do very well in these contests. I guess it's because a sketch is simply a record of a visual observation, and can't compete with a camera lens (unless I had CCD chips for eyes). I never hold much hope of winning the overall contest, but if even one person is inspired by my sketch and decides to give it a try, then it is well worth the effort.

As for the Orion Nebula, here is my only attempt so far:

Posted Image

I've also done a sketch of the Sombrero at low power, but I'd like to get another shot at it at higher magnification. I recently drew a naked eye sketch of Auriga, Taurus, and Mars, with insets of the Pleiades and Mars, in a similar format as my sketch in the contest. You can see it HERE if you are interested.

Thanks again for giving my entry a second look. I appreciate your kind words! :)

Clear skies!
 

#36 GerardG

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 11:42 PM

Choosing only one was very hard. They are all very good.
Congratulation. Great job. :bow:
 

#37 Asbytec

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 09:11 AM

Yea, photographs are hard to beat, for sure. But, really, nothing, not even Hubble deep images, beats the naked eye...actually seeing the object for yourself. I remember, as I am sure we all do, the first time we saw Saturn in a telescope. Even in my 2" cheap-o first scope, it was stunning.

I did look at your sketch of Mars...that's a nice drawing. Mars is so small, but you did capture some surface details. It looks much like I remember it, except for the (usually) prominent polar caps.

Your sketch of Orion takes me back to my childhood...when my love for all things celestial was budding. That is exactly how I remember it. I dare you to get to a dark(er) sky site and try sketching it using an 8" scope. LOL It's simply a feat to bring in all the detail.

Though, if you did...it would win almost any contest hands down, my friend. Photos will over expose much of the detail your sketch would capture. It might even capture it as we all know and love it...in it's subtle wisps of glory.

It might even be a first. I can't say I have ever seen a 'complete' sketch of M42. As I have seen it from my dark sky site in Central America, it might even be impossible to draw it.
 

#38 swalker

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 11:15 AM

MI like Venus in the small image but was surprised the large version was a bit soft and fuzzy.

Rev.

Thats because it represents every image I captured in UV over the 5.5 months the shot encompasses. Some days were sharper than others- seeing isn't usually very good here in New England :( The best seeing occurred the evenings of 4/08, 5/27, 6/10, 6/15, 6/16, and 6/28. It was a great project, and I've already started on the morning apparition.
 

#39 Tanny

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 04:23 PM

Such excellent selections, all!
If I cannot vote more than one as the winner, then I'd at least like to vote 1st, 2nd, and 3rd.

However, after seeing the hi-res photos, I chose the M22 shot. It looks like a hundred-thousand stars in one frame! It's not easy capturing star clusters--they look more 3D in a telescope than in a photo. This one does well.

But, darn, I like 'em all, gang. For a decent price, I'd buy most of them and hang them on my wall.
 

#40 Asbytec

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 09:51 PM

Jay, you're probably not old enough to remember, but who was that sketch artist in S&T back in the 70's? He used a 4" Unitron refractor. The issue came up in another thread and I immediately thought of him, then realized you might be interested in seeing his work. Every month, he did a few sketches. I used to follow his work as a kid.

Anyway, I will post a URL if I can find some articles about him featuring his art work. I mentioned it because he is a classic, IMHO...and maybe someone you'd be interested in.
 

#41 Jaycin

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Posted 16 September 2007 - 09:07 AM

Asby,

Thanks for thinking of me. I was a kid in the 70's, but there weren't any S&T's lying around my house. I'm interested in seeing this sketch artist's work, so please post a link if you can find one. :cool:

I don't know how much time you spend in CN's Sketching Forum, but we have some world class astro-sketchers who post there regularly. Several of them have recently published a book: Astronomical Sketching: A Step by Step Introduction
I'd like to encourage you and anyone reading this to visit the Sketching Forum at least once a week. Not only will you see some extraordinary sketches, but you may learn a thing or two about visual observing. Drawing your observations can seriously enhance your observing skills, and anyone can do it.
 

#42 Asbytec

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Posted 16 September 2007 - 11:31 AM

I am new to the forum, actually. I also did a search for that guy on S&T's web site, but to no avail. (I cannot remember his name, so it's hard to search. I typed in his scope, I remember that much...but got no hits. :()

His name is on the edge of my tongue...gimme a few days for it to roll off. LOL

Okay, I'll check out the sketches.
 

#43 WadeVC

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Posted 16 September 2007 - 03:14 PM

It would seem that some of you are under the impression that my entire sketch is of M31/32/110. I guess I didn't include enough information.


I didn't find your information confusing in the least. It is quite clear what the object(s) you sketched are/were. I just don't understand the so-called confusion at all.
:question: :question:
 

#44 Erix

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 11:06 PM

My apologies for the confusion.

Jason, there's no need to apologize. You had it written very clearly at the bottom of your sketch.

Sometimes I think we spend so much time training our eyes to see details in the sky that we dismiss the details right in front of us on the computer screen. ;)

You packed a lot of information in collage of sketches with your entry. Well done.
 

#45 cildarith

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 02:48 PM

I am new to the forum, actually. I also did a search for that guy on S&T's web site, but to no avail. (I cannot remember his name, so it's hard to search. I typed in his scope, I remember that much...but got no hits. :()

His name is on the edge of my tongue...gimme a few days for it to roll off. LOL

Okay, I'll check out the sketches.


Are you thinking of John Mallas?
 


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