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#7601 Lorenz0x7BC

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 01:26 PM

Just for the fun of it, I tried to do as close to an apples-to-apples comparison in terms of what I can "see" doing EAA with my C6 from my old Bortle 8-ish location in NJ (from a couple of years ago) versus the new Bortle 4 location in GA (from a few days ago). Scope and set-up were the same,  with identical exposures on the same  target (NGC6946) and no filters (however there was a 50% moon low in the southern sky in the NJ pic). C6  was operating at f/4.0 (twin stacked Meade f/6.3 reducers), no dark frames, Lodestar X2 mono using Starlight Live 3.3 software:

Great comparison, Errol! Well done!


 

#7602 wargrafix

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Posted 10 November 2019 - 06:15 AM

Hind's Crimson star

 

275 frames @275 seconds

C9.25 @f6.3

ASI224MC

 

med_gallery_218407_321_206374.png


 

#7603 wargrafix

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Posted 10 November 2019 - 06:24 AM

NGC 2903

 

Stack 257frames 4112s WithDisplayStretch

 

C9.25 @f6.3

ASI224MC

Darks and flats

Captured in Sharpcap pro

 

med_gallery_218407_321_766214.png


 

#7604 alphatripleplus

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Posted 23 November 2019 - 11:43 AM

Here's another comparison of the appearance of a DSO under as near identical set-up conditions between my former Bortle 8ish location vs my current Bortle 4 skies - I used a C8 instead of a C6 this time. I never tire of looking at NGC6946 (the Fireworks galaxy) with its face-on spiral arms and prolific star forming regions. Of course, as this galaxy has had so many supernovae, I might one day get lucky and catch one.smile.gif

 

Anyway, both captures were taken on moonless nights (moon 30 to 40 degrees below the horizon), and with the target at high altitude (69 degrees in NJ and 58 degrees in GA). I used my C8 operating at close to the same reduction in each case using stacked twin Meade f/6.3 reducers (f/3.7 in NJ and f/4.0 in GA) with no filters, SX Lodestar X2 mono and Starlight Live 3.3 for capture, and the same sub length and a total exposure of 3 minutes (12 x 15s). Yes, the camera is noisy and the stars are a bit squarish at the relatively low resolution of about 2 arcsec/pixel, but this is EAA not AP, and I'm not too fussy:

 

NGC 6946; 12 x 15s; C8 @ f/3.7 ( 9/27/16 NJ - Bortle 8)

 

 

 

NGC6946_12x15s_ND_f3.9_RS_2016.9.27_20.22.07.jpg

 

 

NGC 6946; 12 x 15s; C8 @ f/4.0 (11/19/19 GA - Bortle 4)

 

 

NGC6946_12x15s_ND_f4.0_RS_2019.11.19_18.59.25.jpg

 

 

Even in the NJ pic, there are a couple of prominent H II regions visible in the spiral arms, and more can be glimpsed as knots in the GA pic. Hopefully, this gives some idea of what might be seen under different levels of LP.


 

#7605 alphatripleplus

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Posted 23 November 2019 - 12:41 PM

Here are some other prominent galaxy groupings I just recently looked at with my C8 @ f/4.0, using the identical set-up as above (Lodestar X2 mono, SX Starlight Live 3.3, no filters and no darks). All taken in GA under Bortle 4 skies:

 

NGC7331 and Deer Lick group (Pegasus); 12 x 15s: 

 

 

NGC7331_12x15s_ND_f4.0_2019.11.19_21.18.26.jpg

 

In addition to NGC7331, I am easily able to see the four "flea" member galaxies (NGC7335, 7336,  7337 and 7340) of this grouping  now, compared to my old location with a relatively short total exposure. 

 

 

 

Stephan's Quintet (Pegasus); 12 x 15s:

 

 

Stephan.s.Quintet_12x15s_ND_f4.0_RS_2019.11.19_21.27.57.jpg

 

I can see a little more detail in the five galaxies in this compact cluster than when using a C6 at the same total exposure, but this target really needs more than 3 minutes to bring out more detail in the arms of the spiral members.

 

 

NGC891/Silver Sliver galaxy (Andromeda); 12 x 15s

 

NGC891_12x15s_ND_f4.0_RS_2019.11.19_20.36.03.jpg

 

This edge on spiral with its prominent dust lane is another favourite. A little structure can be seen in the dust lane, but a higher resolution view with a smaller pixel camera would probably show that structure better.


 

#7606 alphatripleplus

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Posted 23 November 2019 - 01:10 PM

Last one with the same C8 set-up from above. This is the first time I've tried looking at the Crab Nebula (M1) without using a H-alpha filter and with the C8. (Previously, I've used a H-alpha filter for this target as the filamentary structure is more prominent with one).

 

As the Crab is very bright, even a short single 15s exposure will show something:

 

M1/Crab Nebula (Taurus); 1 x 15s:

 

M1_1x15s_ND_f4.0_RS_2019.11.19_22.17.00.jpg

 

 

More details emerge after a couple of minutes of stacking:

 

 M1/Crab Nebula (Taurus); 8 x 15s:

 

 

M1_8x15s_ND_f4.0_RS_2019.11.19_22.21.39.jpg

 

 


 

#7607 GoFish

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 08:39 AM

Really enjoyed the comparison between Bortle 8 and 4. We are preparing to make a similar move, going from 7 to 4. 


 

#7608 Richard Giuliani

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 03:57 AM

---

 

I confirm if, at present, the Lodestar is the most performing chamber for the EAA (with the same time).

This is my impression.

 

Congratulations to the Avatar "alphatripleplus"

You have been to Polignano a Mare (SE Italy) , my city, but you have not imagined that there is an association (ADIA-Astronomy) and a forum ADIA.

 

Unbelievable. Here is my NGC891, in EAA,  (2013), published on the forum at the link>

 

https://forum.adiaas...p?p=44245#44245

 

...


Edited by Richard Giuliani, 27 November 2019 - 05:42 AM.

 

#7609 Rickster

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Posted 29 November 2019 - 12:29 PM

Interesting comparison Errol.  The difference between Bortle 7 and 4 is significant but not as much as I would have thought.  Now I see (at least one of) the reason(s) that you SX guys like Starlight Live. 


 

#7610 wargrafix

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 08:58 PM

NGC 7331

Stack 264 frames 4224s WithDisplayStretch

 

C9.25 @f6.3

ASI224MC

Darks and flats

Captured in Sharpcap pro

 

med_gallery_218407_321_903012.png


 

#7611 wargrafix

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 09:00 PM

Eskimo nebula

Stack 2758 frames 2758s WithDisplayStretch

 

C9.25 @f6.3

ASI224MC

Darks and flats

Captured in Sharpcap pro

 

med_gallery_218407_321_397588.png


 

#7612 wargrafix

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 09:02 PM

M76

Stack 288 frames 4608s WithDisplayStretch

 

C9.25 @f6.3

ASI224MC

Darks and flats

Captured in Sharpcap pro

 

med_gallery_218407_321_275087.png


 

#7613 wargrafix

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 09:05 PM

UFO galaxy

Stack 353 frames 5648s WithDisplayStretch

 

C9.25 @f6.3

ASI224MC

Darks and flats

Captured in Sharpcap pro

 

 

med_gallery_218407_321_118616.png


 

#7614 robert_arnold

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Posted 01 December 2019 - 02:11 AM

Lovely shots. Impressive detail
Robert
 

#7615 Herschel400

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 11:07 AM

Here's another comparison of the appearance of a DSO under as near identical set-up conditions between my former Bortle 8ish location vs my current Bortle 4 skies - I used a C8 instead of a C6 this time. I never tire of looking at NGC6946 (the Fireworks galaxy) with its face-on spiral arms and prolific star forming regions. Of course, as this galaxy has had so many supernovae, I might one day get lucky and catch one.smile.gif

 

Anyway, both captures were taken on moonless nights (moon 30 to 40 degrees below the horizon), and with the target at high altitude (69 degrees in NJ and 58 degrees in GA). I used my C8 operating at close to the same reduction in each case using stacked twin Meade f/6.3 reducers (f/3.7 in NJ and f/4.0 in GA) with no filters, SX Lodestar X2 mono and Starlight Live 3.3 for capture, and the same sub length and a total exposure of 3 minutes (12 x 15s). Yes, the camera is noisy and the stars are a bit squarish at the relatively low resolution of about 2 arcsec/pixel, but this is EAA not AP, and I'm not too fussy:

 

NGC 6946; 12 x 15s; C8 @ f/3.7 ( 9/27/16 NJ - Bortle 8)

 

 

 

attachicon.gif NGC6946_12x15s_ND_f3.9_RS_2016.9.27_20.22.07.jpg

 

 

NGC 6946; 12 x 15s; C8 @ f/4.0 (11/19/19 GA - Bortle 4)

 

 

attachicon.gif NGC6946_12x15s_ND_f4.0_RS_2019.11.19_18.59.25.jpg

 

 

Even in the NJ pic, there are a couple of prominent H II regions visible in the spiral arms, and more can be glimpsed as knots in the GA pic. Hopefully, this gives some idea of what might be seen under different levels of LP.

Errol...very worthwhile and informative comparison. A question...to get your C8 to F/4 ...and in some images to 3.7 ...did you stack .63 FRs or just use a .33...and what was your spacing FR lens to camera sensor ? Thanks 


 

#7616 cmooney91

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Posted 04 December 2019 - 12:44 PM

I recently bought an ASI294MC-Pro on sale, and a SW Quattro Coma Corrector to use with my Bresser 208mm F3.9 Newt.

 

Last night I got to try it all out under a quarter moon and low hanging hazy skies, not ideal but I'll take what I can get.

 

Skies around me are normally bortle 5

 

I ran the cooler to -10C for dark frame stability, it was only drawing 6%-12%

 

I set a gain of 530 (80%) and made darks for 4, 8 and 16s.  (in retrospect  I think I should have used a much lower gain due to the bright murky skies.) then i took flats using a tracing tablet.

 

The camera behaved well in SharpCap, (Iv'e been having issues with my RisingCam under directshow)

 

(all photos are resized and compressed for image limits)

 

The first thing I shot was Andromeda. I was ecstatic to fit M32 and M110 in the same frame. It was really fun to be able to zoom in and out to soak in all of the details around the FOV. 

 

M31 4s x 131 = 524s

https://www.cloudyni...12251_85247.jpg

 

 

I had a bad line of sight for my high gain Wifi antenna, so I was unable to operate remotely. Fortunately I just got a nice down parka, so I was able to comfortably view at the scope side.

 

Next was M33. It was a perfect test for the new camera; massive wide FOV but chock full of details. Again it is awesome to be able to surf around the building image inspecting the details as it grew in clarity.

 

M33 4s x 66 = 264s

gallery_280529_12251_41340.jpg

 

 

Another great use of the detailed FOV was NGC891 and friends to the SE (never knew).  I was able to get most in frame and zoom into each as if I were using my smaller 224 sensor.

 

NGC891 and Friends 4s x 146 = 584s

https://www.cloudyni...12251_28657.jpg

 

I also looked at some open clusters, as a good check on the coma corrector.  I looked a NGC457 (ET), the double cluster, NGC7789 and M38. I really like M38 and nearby NCG1907. It's near a great binocular asterism that looks like a 1.5° smiley face.

 

M38 and NGC1907 4s x 84 = 336s

https://www.cloudyni...12251_45321.jpg

 

Nearby was IC405 which I had never seen before. It was very beautiful with a mix of red emission and blue reflection nebula, in a sparse cluster.

 

IC405  8s x 22 =176s

gallery_280529_12251_124393.jpg

 

Not too far away in/near Auriga there was  the comet C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS)  A short 5 minute stack showed a faint but long tail.

 

C/2017 T2 4s x 92 = 368s

https://www.cloudyni...etch-downresed/

 

Last Saturday I did a 1 hour time lapse of C/2017 T2 with my 4.5" F4 and my IMX224. I set up sharpcap to save off the live stack every 5 minutes, and then I animated the resulting frames into a video

https://youtu.be/Gch4ZUj8eE0

 

About the time I was getting too cold and thinking about wrapping up M47 crossed over  the meridian and I had to check it out. It would be a good test for internal reflections and field sharpness of the coma corrector. I was amazed at the nebulosity that the camera pulled through the murky skies. 

 

M47 4s x 105 = 420s

https://www.cloudyni...2251_119590.jpg

 

I also shot the Flame+ horsehead,  and then the Orion nebula, but those where shot through floodlit tree limbs and the image suffered accordingly.

 

I ended up wrapping up around 1:30AM, Overall I had a blast and I look forward to more favorable conditions.

 

lessons learned:

I think I should have used a much lower gain. At 530 gain and 4s the histogram was well off the left end, 8s put the hump near 50%.

 

I need to sort out some tilt in an adapter I use to collimate. I rotate the laser, no movement. I rotate the laser plus barlow, no movement. I rotate laser + barlow +adapter, and the dot orbits around.... That or I need to learn to collimate using the camera in place.

 

 

 

 

 


 


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