Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

EAA Image Gallery

  • Please log in to reply
9151 replies to this topic

#8901 alphatripleplus

alphatripleplus

    World Controller

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 127,778
  • Joined: 09 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 17 October 2021 - 03:41 PM

A brief EAA session from last night under the moon.  Set-up  was my AT72EDII 72mm APO reduced to f/4.3,  ASI290MM mini, ASILive 1.4, 7nm- H-alpha filter and no binning, at high (300) gain; taken from my Bortle 4ish back yard.

 

First is NGC6992, the bright northern part of the Eastern Veil nebula. North is at the top in this  7.5 minute total exposure:

 

 

NGC6992 (H-alpha); 18 x 25 sec

 

NGC6992_Ha_f4.4F_Light_Stack_18frames_25sec_RS_Bin1_15.0C_gain300_2021-10-16_232143.jpg

 

Next is the faint emission/ reflection nebula IC63 in Cassiopeia. The bright star is Gamma Cass, and the even fainter IC59 (it has more of a reflection nebula component that H-alpha doesn't show), is faintly visible at the top of the frame above Gamma Cass. With IC63 & IC59 longer exposures are needed for more detail to be visible.

 

IC63 (& IC59) (H-alpha); 18 x 25 sec

 

IC63_Ha_f4.4F_Light_Stack_18frames_25sec_RS_Bin1_15.0C_gain300_2021-10-16_230524.jpg

 

 


  • Ptarmigan, astropinci, CCD-Freak and 13 others like this

#8902 mklosterman1

mklosterman1

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 115
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Rixeyville, VA

Posted 17 October 2021 - 04:58 PM

Very Nice. Besides bright moon, last night I had very poor seeing and my EAA images were pretty bad. I was trying to finish getting the October EAA challenge objects completed. undecided.gif


Edited by mklosterman1, 17 October 2021 - 04:58 PM.

  • roelb and steveincolo like this

#8903 MunichAtNight

MunichAtNight

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 102
  • Joined: 04 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Munich - Germany

Posted 17 October 2021 - 07:16 PM

Hello!
 
Yesterday night I played with Pacman - the nebula! wink.gif

NGC281 ALL Stack 145frames 1160s
  • Teleskop: Skywatcher 130 PDS, 650 mm, 5", f/5
  • Mount: Celestron Nextstar
  • Camera: ZWO ASI 294MC
  • Total time: 1,160 s | Frames: 36 | 8s | Gain: 300
  • Data: 4144 x 2822 pixel
  • Darks: Sharpcap 4.0 PRO
  • Optic: Barlow 1,5x with Coma Corrector -> 975 mm | f/7.5
  • Filter: no
  • Date: 2021-10-17 | Time: 21:52 UTC | Outdoor: 7,9 °C
  • Annotated Image: Astrometry.net
CS MunichAtNight - Ewald
  • Ptarmigan, Stargazer3236, roelb and 7 others like this

#8904 Lastinline

Lastinline

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 97
  • Joined: 06 Dec 2020
  • Loc: NJ, USA

Posted 18 October 2021 - 09:19 AM

The bright moon plagues us all, but we persevere with our filters.

 

All images with an Ha filter

gain 320, flats and darks
Sharpstar 76 EDPH @ F/4.5
ASI 294MM
Astronomik Ha 12nm filter
Sharpcap Pro 4

 

California nebula, 10s x 85:

California
 
Flaming Star nebula, 10s x 124:
Flaming Star
 

The Moon through the clouds, 32ms x 1:

Moon

Edited by Lastinline, 18 October 2021 - 09:19 AM.

  • Ptarmigan, alphatripleplus, roelb and 7 others like this

#8905 Eclipsed

Eclipsed

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 321
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Posted 19 October 2021 - 05:31 PM

Impressive!!  It looks like you picked up NGC 7313 too, while you were at it.  I clearly have to spend more time with my 178MM.  

J.A.-I.D. also picked up PGC771256 as a faint fuzzy patch towards the lower right side of the image.  Mag 16.25, Impressive!  https://www.cloudyni...#entry11394588 


Edited by Eclipsed, 19 October 2021 - 05:33 PM.

  • steveincolo likes this

#8906 MunichAtNight

MunichAtNight

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 102
  • Joined: 04 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Munich - Germany

Posted 19 October 2021 - 07:42 PM

Pleiades, M45
 
can be easily seen by naked eyes and as well with my small overview camera, a ZWO ASI 120MC mini just with a 6mm lens, too. I discovered The Seven Sisters by chance when hunting the comet Tschuri some days ago. In the following photo you can see them just in the middle.
 
Stack 118frames 59s WithDisplayStretch


By doing some reasearch for M45, I found very interesting, that our ancestors all over the world were very interested in the Pleiades, centuries before us.

  • For the Bedouins, the rising of the Pleiades signals summer and the setting signals winter: "The Pleiades go up over a dry grain hull and sink when the valley turns into a brook."
     
  • This corresponds to the Jewish view: "Because of the coldness of the Pleiades, the world can only exist because the Sirius compensates with its heat. "
     
  • The Greeks and Romans (Latin: Vergiliae) considered the early set of the seven stars to be at the beginning of November the sign of the field cultivation and the end of shipping. With the morning of the at that time, May 20, the Pleiades were considered a signal generator for the beginning harvest). Flavius ​​Josephus mentions that the fall of the sevenstars around the time of the Feast of Tabernacles in November the onset of rain puts an end to the water shortage.
     
  • The Maasai in Africa use the Pleiades today as a rainy season signal star.
     
  • The Arabic astrology published by Gladys Dickson states May 20th for early morning and November 17th for early sunset; mentioned in the ancient Greek tradition the Geoponica the corresponding dates for June 10th and November 4th.
     
  • For the Blackfoot Indians of North America, the constellation of the Pleiades was of vital importance. The Blackfoot were nomadic hunters and gatherers. They lived in small groups in tipis made from bison skin. Sometimes a few groups or even an entire sub-tribe joined together to form hunting expeditions. The state of the Pleiades at the beginning of the dry season was the starting signal for an extensive driven hunt of the huge herds of bison. When the Pleiades have disappeared from the starry sky at the end of April, the bison have also disappeared.

Above Infos with thanks from wikipedia

 
The following Photo doesn't show the full area of the Pleiades. The focal length of my newton in combination with my ZWO ASI294MC is to big. The only combination which would work can be a different full size sensor camera, i.E. ASI2400MC, for which I won't and can't spend the money. And a full-sensor camera might cause other problems. And reducers won't work in a reasonable quality either, so the only way for me will be to create a mosaic with several single photos mounted together. So this will be a interesting, future project to try with Photoshop.
 
M45 Plejaden ALL Stack 40frames 80s WithDisplayStretch
  • Telescope: Skywatcher 130 PDS, 650 mm, 5", f/5
  • Mount: Celestron Nexstar
  • Camera: ZWO ASI 294MC
  • Total time: 80 s | Frames: 40 | 2s | Gain: 300
  • Data: 4144 x 2822 pixel
  • Darks: Sharpcap 4.0 PRO
  • Optic: no Barlow, Baader Coma Corrector MPCC Mark III
  • Filter: no
  • Date: 2021-10-17 | Time: 01:03 UTC | Outdoor: 10.1 °C
  • Annotated Image: Astrometry.net

Edited by MunichAtNight, 19 October 2021 - 07:55 PM.

  • Ptarmigan, roelb, BrentKnight and 5 others like this

#8907 chilldaddy

chilldaddy

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 200
  • Joined: 10 Jul 2018
  • Loc: Norman, OK

Posted 19 October 2021 - 09:45 PM

I recently spent a couple nights at Copper Breaks State Park in Northern Central Texas.  It is an International Dark Sky Association Dark Sky Park with Bortle 2 skies and it was fabulous!

 

The AT60ED with an F/6.3 focal reducer for roughly F/4 and ASI533 provided some nice wide views.  All images were captured with that setup riding an Evolution mount on a wedge.  A UV/IR cut filter was used on all but the Pleiades where a D1 helped with a slight LP gradient.

 

The weather was ideal and I was treated to a spectacular fireball that illuminated the hillside with a green glow before changing to orange.  The other highlight was running into people stargazing at the campsite and inviting them to join me.  My solo adventure turned into a party with new friends asking lots of questions and taking pictures of my laptop screen.  It was something that just wouldn't have happened if everyone had to take turns looking in an eyepiece.  EAA made it a joy for everyone involved.  I'll have to take my 27" monitor with me from now on.  grin.gif

 

Here are some highlights of the trip. (Click on images for larger versions)

 

M8 region

145x 15.0s 2175s

M8 - Lagoon Nebula, M20 - Trifid Nebula, M21

 

M24

30x 15.0s 450s

M24 - Small Sagittarius Star Cloud
 
M11
12x 15.0s 180s
M11 - Wild Duck Cluster

 

M31

66x 15.0s 990s

M31 - Andromeda Galaxy

 

Helix Nebula

93x 15.0s 1395s

NGC 7293 - Helix Nebula

 

Sculptor Galaxy

33x 15.0s 495s

NGC 253 - Sculptor Galaxy & NGC 288
 
Pleiades
30x 30.0s 900s
M45 - Pleiades

 

 

Greg


  • Ptarmigan, CCD-Freak, Stargazer3236 and 13 others like this

#8908 Lastinline

Lastinline

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 97
  • Joined: 06 Dec 2020
  • Loc: NJ, USA

Posted 20 October 2021 - 09:41 AM

Widefield observations of nebula and star clusters using a very small refractor. It is fun to see how neighboring objects are arranged relative to each other.
 
All shots with an Askar FMA180 @ f/4.5, ASI294MM, and an Ha filter.
 
Heart and Soul. 10s x 67
Heart and Soul. Stack 67frames 670s WithDisplayStretch

 

Elephant Trunk region. 10s x 22

Elephant Trunk region. Stack 22frames 220s WithDisplayStretch

 

The region including Flaming Star nebula, Tadpoles nebula, M36 and M38. 10s x 21

Flaming Star/M38/M36 region. Stack 21frames 210s WithDisplayStretch

Edited by Lastinline, 20 October 2021 - 09:44 AM.

  • Ptarmigan, Stargazer3236, roelb and 8 others like this

#8909 BrentKnight

BrentKnight

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,875
  • Joined: 29 Dec 2014
  • Loc: Foley, Alabama

Posted 21 October 2021 - 04:40 PM

I recently spent a couple nights at Copper Breaks State Park in Northern Central Texas.  It is an International Dark Sky Association Dark Sky Park with Bortle 2 skies and it was fabulous!

 

The AT60ED with an F/6.3 focal reducer for roughly F/4 and ASI533 provided some nice wide views.  All images were captured with that setup riding an Evolution mount on a wedge.  A UV/IR cut filter was used on all but the Pleiades where a D1 helped with a slight LP gradient.

 

The weather was ideal and I was treated to a spectacular fireball that illuminated the hillside with a green glow before changing to orange.  The other highlight was running into people stargazing at the campsite and inviting them to join me.  My solo adventure turned into a party with new friends asking lots of questions and taking pictures of my laptop screen.  It was something that just wouldn't have happened if everyone had to take turns looking in an eyepiece.  EAA made it a joy for everyone involved.  I'll have to take my 27" monitor with me from now on.  grin.gif

 

Here are some highlights of the trip. (Click on images for larger versions)

 

M8 region

145x 15.0s 2175s

 

Greg

Great images Greg.

 

I like that your M8 region picked up the nebula/cluster around IC 4685 and especially The Chinese Dragon near NGC 6559.

 


  • chilldaddy likes this

#8910 Eclipsed

Eclipsed

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 321
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Posted 22 October 2021 - 10:38 AM

Soap Bubble nebula (attempted to find it but could not see the nebula, however the circle represents the EXACT location of where it would be).

attachicon.gifSoap Bubble.jpg

 

Great that you posted the attempt. I think that the soap bubble nebula would a fantastic EAA shot if it could be captured.  I haven't tried, but maybe the right narrowband filtering might help?  Since this object wasn't even discovered until 2008, I assume its a bit tricky to image.



#8911 Clouzot

Clouzot

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 585
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2018
  • Loc: French Riviera

Posted 22 October 2021 - 05:26 PM

A one-object H-alpha session from my balcony:

 

  • What: Skull Nebula, NGC 246 / Caldwell 56, in Cetus
  • When: this evening, Oct 23, just after the Full Moon. Seeing measured at 2.9 arcsec RMS
  • How: C6 at f/8, 294MM bin2, Ha filter, 11x180s exposures totaling 33 minutes, ASIAir Pro (Live mode), darks, flats, flatdarks.
  • Why: because it's the only Ha object in my limited field of view before midnight, and... well, not only because of that (see below)

Screenshot 2021-10-22 at 23.56.49.jpg

 

Scientists say this planetary nebula was formed by a star that was pretty similar to our sun. Now that all its external layers have been ejected, it's in the process of becoming a white dwarf.

When zooming in, one can almost see that the central star is in fact double (even triple). The fainter companion, around 11h, is the one star that expelled most of its matter.

The whole group is said to be moving pretty fast in the interstellar medium, so the nebula is compressed at its "bow" (hence the brighter zone at the bottom in that livestack.

 

By the way, to be honest, I don't really see that object as a "skull". I'll redo it for Halloween, perhaps it'll make more sense then.


  • Ptarmigan, Stargazer3236, roelb and 8 others like this

#8912 wargrafix

wargrafix

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,556
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Trinidad

Posted 23 October 2021 - 10:52 AM

Impressive work everyone!

#8913 Stargazer3236

Stargazer3236

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • ****-
  • Posts: 5,050
  • Joined: 07 Aug 2010
  • Loc: Waltham, MA

Posted 23 October 2021 - 03:41 PM

Great that you posted the attempt. I think that the soap bubble nebula would a fantastic EAA shot if it could be captured.  I haven't tried, but maybe the right narrowband filtering might help?  Since this object wasn't even discovered until 2008, I assume its a bit tricky to image.

I hear it is very faint. I had attached the Optolong L-eXtreme filter to my ASI533MC Pro camera, but I just couldn't eke out any detail, let alone a shape.


  • Eclipsed likes this

#8914 Mikehuerto

Mikehuerto

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 164
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Valencia, Spain

Posted 23 October 2021 - 06:00 PM

Quick 5 minute snap of M33 just as the moon was rising to the East.  Plan was to do further tests with the rotator. Started out as a crystal clear night, but alas the clouds rolled in, and the moon rose, so  I called it a night. Looks like flats work ok, even after 20 mins with the rotator, but need to do more testing. Curiously, I got better contrast after 5 mins, than after 20 mins (I blame the moon). Recentering by plate-solving, every couple of minutes worked nicely. 

 

I kept the black level pretty far to the left, to keep the faint spirals.  Also - saved a  16 bit FITS file of this, so will try and process further in Startools. 

 

314 x 1 sec

490 gain

ASi 294MC pro -10 C

ZWO UV-IR filter

SW GOTO 14¨ Dobson

Darks and flats subtracted

Pegasus Falcon rotator. (see rotator discussion link for more details and comments) https://www.cloudyni...ion/?p=11434826

SW Coma corrector

Sharpcap4 - Darks and flats, stacked stretched

Saved as JPEG and cropped 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Stack_314frames_314s_WithDisplayStretch - Copy.jpg

Edited by Mikehuerto, 24 October 2021 - 01:37 PM.

  • Ptarmigan, roelb, BrentKnight and 6 others like this

#8915 Stargazer3236

Stargazer3236

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • ****-
  • Posts: 5,050
  • Joined: 07 Aug 2010
  • Loc: Waltham, MA

Posted 23 October 2021 - 11:06 PM

I am considering the PegasusFalcon rotator, but darn is it so expensive!



#8916 garyc11

garyc11

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,080
  • Joined: 20 Nov 2004
  • Loc: outskirts of infinity

Posted 24 October 2021 - 12:28 PM

i have been thinking about building a rotator 

you can find instructions online its a lot cheaper than the falcon



#8917 alphatripleplus

alphatripleplus

    World Controller

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 127,778
  • Joined: 09 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 24 October 2021 - 01:18 PM

Moderator Note:

 

The gallery thread is not a general discussion thread, beyond an occasional comment or question about an image in the topic. If you want to discuss a specific topic, please do so in a new thread. Thanks.



#8918 Mikehuerto

Mikehuerto

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 164
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Valencia, Spain

Posted 24 October 2021 - 01:33 PM

Moderator Note:

 

The gallery thread is not a general discussion thread, beyond an occasional comment or question about an image in the topic. If you want to discuss a specific topic, please do so in a new thread. Thanks.

I´ve now provided the link for the new rotator discussion in my M33 post above - I hope that helps.  smile.gif

 

https://www.cloudyni...ion/?p=11434826


Edited by Mikehuerto, 24 October 2021 - 01:38 PM.

  • steveincolo likes this

#8919 Clouzot

Clouzot

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 585
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2018
  • Loc: French Riviera

Posted 25 October 2021 - 01:40 AM

When zooming in, one can almost see that the central star is in fact double (even triple). The fainter companion, around 11h, is the one star that expelled most of its matter.

And here is a "faux lucky" livestack of the Skull Nebula, made yesterday evening on the ASIAir Pro, C6 f/8, ASI294MM bin2, 225 x 5s , gain 200. Save as seen, zoom 100% and cropped.

 

The white dwarf, around 7h, is now a bit more resolved, but I was limited by seeing (measured at 2.5 arcsec, while the duo is separated by less than 4 arcsec)

2021-10-24T21.34.49.jpg

 

Working with so little signal had the adverse effect of unmasking one serious AAP limitation: the Live mode seems to be using 16-bit livestacks and the signal only takes 3 or 4 bits of dynamic range. Stretching the histogram is very difficult as compression-like artifacts immediately appear. For this kind of edge-case technique, I think Sharpcap is still the best tool as it benefits from a fully featured 32-bit stack.


Edited by Clouzot, 25 October 2021 - 12:10 PM.

  • Ptarmigan, roelb, BrentKnight and 4 others like this

#8920 alphatripleplus

alphatripleplus

    World Controller

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 127,778
  • Joined: 09 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 25 October 2021 - 09:56 PM

Just finished a quick EAA session well before moonrise, taking the opportunity to look at NGC253, the Sculptor Galaxy at Dec -25, and around 19 degrees altitude. This galaxy covers a large FOV on my small sensor camera - for comparison I'm including a picture I took this evening of NGC7331 in Pegasus, which is much smaller in comparison. Both exposures were 7 minutes total and the set-up  was my AT72EDII 72mm @f/6.0,  ASI290MM mini, ASILive 1.4, no binning, at high (300) gain; taken from my Bortle 4ish back yard. Click to zoom in.

 

NGC253; 42 x 10 sec

 

NGC253_f6.0_Light_Stack_42frames_10sec_RS_Bin1_22.8C_gain300_2021-10-25_212022.jpg

 

NGC7331; 42 x 10 sec

 

NGC7331_f6.0_Light_Stack_42frames_10sec_RS_Bin1_23.3C_gain300_2021-10-25_204941.jpg


  • Ptarmigan, CCD-Freak, roelb and 11 others like this

#8921 PeterAB

PeterAB

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 114
  • Joined: 20 Nov 2019
  • Loc: Southern Wisconsin, USA

Posted 25 October 2021 - 11:48 PM

Hi,

 

I had my wide field telescope out for the October challenge.    I finished up my objectives for the night and had a few minutes before moonrise.     Got a quick look at m31 that I thought turned out well for not much effort.

 

Skywatcher 72ed.   Zwo ASI294mc.   Celestron CG-4 mount with a RA tracking motor.   Clear city sky with a visual limiting magnitude just under m4.  Eight minute exposure.  16x30 gain 130.   Live stacked in Sharpcap and saved as viewed.

 

m31 Stack_16frames_480s.jpg   

 

Peter


Edited by PeterAB, 26 October 2021 - 12:05 AM.

  • Ptarmigan, CCD-Freak, roelb and 7 others like this

#8922 Eclipsed

Eclipsed

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 321
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2020
  • Loc: Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Posted 27 October 2021 - 10:03 AM

Haven't been out with telescope much lately, either weather bad or I've been out of town.  Two days ago it looked nice and clear so I spent 45 minutes getting my scope outside and nicely polar aligned and ready for a great evening of imaging.  But as soon as i got ready to start my first live stack, it got really windy and the clouds rolled in quickly.  I did get this rather grainy/noisy single shot of NGC 40 / caldwell 2 (Bow Tie Nebula) just before packing up the gear.   Could have been much better with a few frames to stack!

 

Celestron Evolution 8 EdgeHD on nexstar mount with Celestron wedge

Guiding - not used

0.7x focal reducer

ASI 178MC

DGM NPB narrowband nebula filter

Total exposure: 31.2 seconds (single frame captured)

Gain: 272

Cropped and re-sized only.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Bow Tie Nebula Stack_1frames_31s_WithDisplayStretch.jpg

Edited by Eclipsed, 27 October 2021 - 10:08 AM.

  • roelb, BrentKnight, steveincolo and 4 others like this

#8923 bthrel

bthrel

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 421
  • Joined: 02 May 2020
  • Loc: Linden TN

Posted 28 October 2021 - 07:28 AM

The Triangulum Galaxy a spiral galaxy 2.73 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598.

 

OTA: William Optics Megrez 120 APO  @ F7.5

Mount: Celestron AVX

Camera: ASI 294MC-PRO

Filter: IR/CUT

Capture: bin1 , gain 400, 23x8s  frames - 184s, Not Cooled, RAW16, SC 4.0 saved as seen

No Darks

Guiding:  None

Light pollution: Moon not risen yet

Weather: calm clear, excellent transparency

Seeing: average

 

Stack 23frames 184s WithDisplayStretch

 

 


  • roelb, BrentKnight, steveincolo and 4 others like this

#8924 dave85374

dave85374

    Vostok 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 116
  • Joined: 14 May 2019
  • Loc: Surprise, AZ

Posted 28 October 2021 - 01:39 PM

Well, I finally made some master files (flat, bias, & dark) to use with my telescope.  I am quite please with the results because without the masters I couldn't get a photo of M31 that wasn't too bright in the center of the photos and getting rid of the my center problem caused me to loose the detail in the surrounding area of the galaxy.

 

The photo was 75 8 second shots with a gain of 200.  Photo was taken from my back yard 2 nights ago.

 

A better photo is on my image gallery as it is almost 1gb as this one is only 152kb.

Attached Thumbnails

  • M31 IPAD 1.jpg

  • Ptarmigan, roelb, BrentKnight and 9 others like this

#8925 steveincolo

steveincolo

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 589
  • Joined: 26 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Boulder, Colorado, US

Posted 29 October 2021 - 02:58 AM

Quite a good sky just now!  C8, 0.63x, ASI178MM, gain 270

 

A portion of the Flame Nebula

29Oct21 01 33 38
 
Barnard 33
29Oct21 01 40 07
 
Holmgren II
29Oct21 01 12 03
 
UGC 3697 (Integral Sign Galaxy)
29Oct21 00 52 56
 
NGC 7331
NGC 7331 28Oct21 23 02 06

 


  • CCD-Freak, Stargazer3236, alphatripleplus and 12 others like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics