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Small Wonders: Pegasus

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#1 asaint

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 05:13 AM

Small Wonders: Pegasus

#2 John Kocijanski

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 05:54 AM

Another excellent article Tom. I'll give the fainter galaxies a try when the moon goes away. NGC 7331 and M15 are regulars on my observing list for this time of the year.

#3 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 07:53 AM

I had trouble getting the pictures in the Microsoft Word version. Anyone else have this problem?

Oh, and kudos to Tom for another great guide!

#4 Tom T

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 08:12 AM

Simon,

Yep - just checked - that's a problem. I'll get it fixed and post here when I have it done.

I wondered why the .doc files were so much smaller than the PDF's.

T

#5 ArizonaScott

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 09:33 AM

Great article Tom, and some nice challenges. Thanks! :bow:

#6 desertstars

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 01:19 PM

Busy place, Pegasus! And another project to add to the ever-growing list. Nice work, as usual.

#7 cildarith

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 01:32 PM

Thanks for another great article, Tom!

#8 Tom T

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 02:49 PM

Ok folks - The downloadable version has been reposted in PDF form and looks ok to me. If you have any issues, let me know and I'll do what I can.

It is MUCH larger than the .doc file (no surprise).

Thanks for the comments, I'm gratified that you are finding these enjoyable and useful. I am sure getting a kick out of writing them.

#9 half meter

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 12:20 AM

Pease 1 is a nice choice for the challenge object, Tom :D

I first located it this past summer using my 8" SCT and the I3 eyepiece. Here is a link to my observation report . Farther down in the thread is a locater chart I made that shows exactly how I starhopped to Pease 1 and confirmed it.

#10 Ptarmigan

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 12:34 AM

I've seen M15 before in the city. Really bright for a globular cluster. I like to see Pease 1. Can you see it without a filter in a dark location with a 8 inch telescope?

#11 half meter

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 09:12 AM

Without a filter (or an I3 eyepiece) in an 8", I think it would be *very* difficult, especially if it's your first time seeing it. It's only 1 arc-second in diameter!

#12 Tom T

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 05:47 PM

I think it would be difficult, but might very well be doable.

According to Doug Snyders site: http://www.blackskie...m/pease_obs.htm

Wolfgang Howurek *did* manage to catch it in an 8" scope - however, he did employ a filter.

In any case, good finder charts are a *must*

#13 Daniel Mounsey

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Posted 27 October 2004 - 12:11 AM

Tom,
You never cease to amaze me with your talant. I use Kepple's Astro Card kit with the luminator board for these types of galaxy hunts. The batteries last about five years before you need to change them. I've seen just about every object in Pegasus and I use Burnham's Celestial Handbook as my primary reference, but I also like the books you referenced as well. I think observers are going to learn a great deal from this wonderful review of yours.

#14 Tom T

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Posted 27 October 2004 - 10:23 AM

Thank you Daniel.

Tom

#15 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 27 October 2004 - 06:45 PM

I own Turn Left at Orion, 365 Starry Nights, and Rukl's Constellation Guidebook and while all of them are good , in my opinion they don't have a thing over your offerings.

Folks, I think we better knock off the praise or he may stop giving these away for free! ;)

#16 michaeloconnell

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 05:05 PM

Another fine article as usual Tom.
I must say I find these articles extremely readable and they have a certain conversational tone about it, which is rather nice.

#17 Tom T

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Posted 29 October 2004 - 04:04 PM

Thanks guys.

T

#18 jdickson

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Posted 29 October 2004 - 08:30 PM

I have it printed and ready and even did a dry run using Starry Night. The sky is clear (finally) but the moon is bright. Not sure how much luck I'll have with the galaxies for another week or so but I'm looking forward to it.

Thanks Tom!

#19 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 05:24 AM

A compilation of your work would make a best-selling astro "must have". I'll add these to the list for my next dark sky trip.
:bow:

#20 ForgottenMObject

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 12:22 PM

Ummm... wow... That is a great article! Very detailed, well written... I could definately see a book coming out of these!

From all of us folks who like faint fuzzies but who are overwhelmed by all the fuzzies out there, thanks!

#21 b1gred

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 03:18 PM

Remember everyone, I have first "dibs" on an autographed copy of Tom's book when it comes out. We're going to have to wait a couple of years until he has ALL the constellations compiled.

Just kidding, Tom, when you feel like publishing, we'll all be standing in line.

#22 rmcpb

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 08:06 PM

A brilliant article and a real challenge for me as Pegasus is a bit far north for us down here to grab the fainter fuzzies but its up high in the evening now and the guide is fantastic. Some real challenges :-)

Cheers

#23 Tom T

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 09:13 PM

Thanks folks!

T

#24 jdickson

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 05:30 PM

I logged NGC7619 and 7626 in my 10" f5 dob during the new moon. I used a 15mm GSO superview (and your article) ~x83 power to find and observe them. I don't have my actual field notes here at the moment. There were very faint hints of others in the area but weren't as certain as 7619 and 7626. It was nice having the information from the article handy. 250 million light years! I have acquired a RACI finder in the last month and star hopping has never been easier. I've also really improved at just "seeing", especially galaxies. Where once (last April?) I could barely find M81,82 those two now stand out like a sore thumb and I can detect and observe much fainter fuzzies. These are very fun hops you've put together. It was challenging. It was a ways from starting point but that made it all the more rewarding to finally get there and confirm the two galaxies. I still need to try for Stephan's Quintet. I'll probably wait until closer to the new moon now.

Thanks Tom, looking forward to next months :)

#25 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 11:11 PM

I checked out Pegasus for a bit last night. The waxing moon made getting a fix with the Telrad slightly difficult. I tried to find M15 -- everyone raves about what a showpiece it is -- but I couldn't find it. I kept checking my charts, and I'm pretty sure (well...sorta sure) I was in the right area. All I found was what looked to me like a smallish galaxy, on the dim side - certainly not a showpiece (like the Double Cluster, which I had no trouble finding). Is there a small galaxy or planetary nebula in the vicinity of M15? Or was I way off? The moon (and the fog) is going to make viewing problematic for a while.


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