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#1 Dick Lipke

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 11:09 AM

I didn't know were else to go.I have looking for a book with photos of meteorites found and collected across earth.
I have "the art of collecting meteorits" by Kevin Kichinka but there are very few photos.The nearest thing I found was by Astronomy magizine,Aug.2006 wich I kept and treasure.I have searched many web sites but all the books or pamphlets have been a flop,not even comeing close to what I'm looking for.Some of the photos in Astronomy magizine,I swear,look like some of the unusal stones I have collected from my rock garden over the years and the garden seems to be geting smaller every year.I have always been fasinated by these messangers from the begining of time.

#2 csa/montana

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 11:49 AM

Dick, here is a thread that might be of interest to you. Our very own Glassthrower is now a Vendor for selling meteorites, & has a great deal of knowledge he's more than willing to share.

http://www.cloudynig...Number/2146856/

Hope this helps!

Carol

#3 meteorite

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 01:19 PM

Hi Dick,

Maybe I can help. I have bought/sold/traded meteorites for over 10 years. I have had dealings with major researchers, museums, etc in the field of meteoritics.

If you just want to look at photos of meteorites, as your post indicates, then get two books by O. Richard Norton. One is Rocks from Space (now in second edition) and the other is The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Meteorites. Both have many pictures.

Your search on the web should not have been a "flop" as there are a great deal of websites devoted to meteorites. If you want to know more about meteorites, one of the best web-based sources of information is this page from the International Meteorite Collectors Association http://imca.cc/index...id=14&Itemid=31

I wrote it :-)

BTW, meteorites are interestingand old, but they are not from the beginning of time, they are from the beginning of our solar system, though some do contain material of extra-solar origin, formed prior to the condensation of the solar nebula which gave birth to our solar system.

-Walter

#4 Dick Lipke

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 08:02 AM

The only reason I said "flop" was I was unable to get any idea to the info inside these books,all I could see was the covers and I can't judge a books buy their covers :grin:.
Both Those web sites are just what I'm looking for.THANKS!
The begining of anything needs a starting point,our solar system is Earths begining of time.

#5 csa/montana

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 09:39 AM

Walter, thanks for the information!

Carol

#6 Glassthrower

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 10:30 AM

Hi Walt and Gang!

It's good to see you here Walt. I wonder how many other meteorite collectors are out there hiding amongst the body of CN users?

Walt already gave the best advice - Rocks from Space. No aspiring meteorite collector should be without it. It's a great read - informative and fun.

Dick, if you get a chance, post some photos of the old suspect rocks you have and we'll try and help you ID them.

Regards,

MikeG

#7 csa/montana

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 11:14 AM

Mike, hopefully all of the Meteorite Mob will come out from behind their meteorites & post here; it's so interesting to see other's collections & just talk!

Carol

#8 Dick Lipke

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 01:15 PM

I'd love to send some photos,but I'm still trying to figure out all the buttons on the remote for the TV.
Many of the rocks I have,have the same glossy look and contain grainy particles different in color that suround them like I have seen in the Astro. magizine and various web sites I have visited.I can't be sure if they are from out there or a product of Earths evolution.

#9 Glassthrower

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 06:55 PM

Dick, there are a couple of simple tests you can do to determine the likelihood of a given "rock" being meteoritic or not. The most definitive test (besides full-blown lab analysis) is the so-called "nickel test", but that requires chemicals. The easiest is to put a magnet next to it and see what happens. The more powerful the magnet, the better. If it's *not* magnetic, then it's likely *not* a meteorite. However, if it is magnetic it *may* be a meteorite. Many terrestrial rocks have some degree of attraction to a magnet, but very few meteorites show no attraction at all to a magnet. So if a given rock is shows absolutely no magnetic attraction, then it's either a earth-rock of some kind, or it's a very rare meteorite type.

Other methods include filing a "window" past the outer crust of the specimen and examining the insides of the rock. Many meteorites have a distinctive look to the inside "matrix" - including metal flecks and "chondrules" which are round (usually round) mineral inclusions. A few rare earth rocks can mimic this look, but it's not common.

See this link for more information on identifying a possible meteorite - it also has some nice photos as a guide :

http://meteorites.pd...meteoriteid.htm

Also, see this link for common "meteorwrongs" which are rocks and other materials often mistaken for meteorites :

http://meteorites.pd...eteor_wrong.htm

Regards,

MikeG

#10 Glassthrower

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 10:39 PM

:grin:

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#11 csa/montana

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 10:53 PM

One way to keep your CN beanie from blowing away, Mike! :lol:

Carol :grin:

#12 meteorite

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 12:19 AM

Here is another quick and "dirty" meteorite vs. meteor"wrong" test. Take you suspect rock to your household toilet. Remove the cover to expose the underside of the cover, the part without the glaze. Run the rock over it to try to produce a streak. Most terrestrial rocks will streak. For example hematite will streak red and magnetite will streak grey. Most meteorites, unless they are heavily weathered, will leave no streak.

-Walter

#13 Dick Lipke

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 08:32 AM

I ordered boths books by Richard Norton from amazon.
Yes, I know about the nickel content of meteorites and the magnet test but have been afraid of being disapointed of the results.You know like if you never go to the doctor you don't have to worry being sick. I'll go ahead and try the maganet and other tests suggested and keep on hopeing,never know till you try.

#14 D_talley

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 07:52 PM

Ok, I just stopped myself from getting embarrassed.

Some friends in Austin Texas had some fossils that seemed to have meteorites embedded in them. I took photos of the fossils and also of two of the meteorites that they found. I was going to post the photos here and ask about them but went to the "meteor wrong" site and discovered that they are only hematite. I guess the Hematite formed in the crack of the fossils years ago. Enjoy the photos anyway.








I had a great theory that the animals died from a major meteor impact. Darn...... :crazy:



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#15 Dick Lipke

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 07:32 AM

Walt,in the many years experience you have dealing with meteorits,what do think of the use of metal detectors to distiguish or identify them?
Also it would be nice if a couple of pros like youself could start a forum detecated to meteorites only.

Dick

#16 Jamie76

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:40 PM

I'm a meteorite collector. Mainly interested in achondrites, namely Aubrites. I also am interested in carbonaceous chondrites. I had a pretty nice smaller collection, but then sold most off. Now I have mainly micro/macro specimens.

#17 Glassthrower

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 11:14 PM

Micros are a good way to build a wide collection without breaking the bank. When you consider that many rare meteorite types exceed $1000 per gram, having anything but a micro can get expensive. That's why I like UNWA material so much - one can acquire large substantial chunks of meteorite for relatively little money. I have a two part personal collection - one of micromounts that consists of rare/exotic types and hammers. And the other part is large UNWA stony specimens, 100, 200, 500 grams each or larger.

I'd like to have bigger pieces of the rare ones and the oddballs, but I have to eat. Dang food! :shakecane: :silly:

#18 Jamie76

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 09:10 PM

I think I missed out on the new NWA Aubrite that had been offered recently.

I also missed out on Chassigny when the price actually was "reasonable" for a crumb. I remember when it was selling for $100,000 a gram.

#19 Glassthrower

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 11:44 PM

Historic falls and hammers are hot right now - on the meteorite market, or at least that's my recent experience.

I haven't ventured into historic falls yet, because the prices are generally outside what I can afford for my personal collection. I'm interested in them, and admire them from afar, but I haven't purchased any yet.

I have acquired a few hammers, although I don't think any could be considered historic. Currently I have New Orleans, Peekskill, Carancas, and Park Forest in my growing collection of hammers. Park Forest includes a riker mount full of "impact artifacts" from one of the houses it hit - pieces of window glass, drywall, etc.

Which NWA Aubrite did you miss Jaimie?

Regards,

MikeG

#20 Jamie76

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 08:16 PM

NWA 4799

#21 Glassthrower

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 09:18 PM

The Meteoritical Bulletin lists NWA 4799 as a provisional "unknown" with the main mass being owned by the Hupe Collection. It's not unusual for meteorites to be listed as "provisional" for a long period of time - the Meteoritical Society works much like Entmoot on these things. ;)

But what is a little unusual, in my experience, is seeing a provisional classified as "unknown".

Where did you see it as an aubrite? I'm curious about it.

http://tin.er.usgs.g...hp?sea=nwa 4799

Regards,

MikeG

#22 Jamie76

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:10 PM

Actually Greg has some listed on ebay now: Meteorites on eBay
Too bad I'm strapped with the impending wedding :noway:

#23 Glassthrower

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 11:57 PM

Greg offers some really nice stuff. I've bought specimens from him and his brother Adam on several occasions. Between the two of them, their collection is truly world-class.

#24 Dick Lipke

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 07:39 AM

Mike,I asked a question a few days ago and addressed it to Walt,never got a reply,maybe he is to busy elsewhwere?
I was wondering about the use of metal detectors.Have you ever used one in great anticipation in finding meteorites,and if so any preference to a model.
Also why note start a forum dedicted to the interest of
meteorites.

#25 csa/montana

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 09:28 AM

Also why note start a forum dedicted to the interest of
meteorites.



Dick, the Administrators are reluctant to open new forums, as there are so many now. If a large amount of interest from members shows, then it may be a possibility at a later date.

Carol


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