Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Took the leap - joined the Meteoritical Society!

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
4 replies to this topic

#1 Glassthrower

Glassthrower

    Vendor - Galactic Stone & Ironworks

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 18,610
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005

Posted 10 April 2008 - 09:38 PM

I joined the Meteoritical Society yesterday. :)

It's also known as the International Society for Meteoritics and Planetary Science. It's a fairly-serious academic group that consists of a wide variety of members from around the world - mostly scientists, retired scientists, hardcore collectors, dealers, and a smattering of members whose speciality is outside meteoritics but in a related science. They publish the monthly "MAPS" journal, which is a peer-reviewed planerary science and meteoritics journal.

http://meteoriticalsociety.org

The Meteoritical Society was founded by the grandfather of meteoritics, Harvey H. Nininger. (and member Fredrick C. Leonard) in 1933 - when meteoritics was not considered a serious field of research and even the famous "Meteor Crater" near Canyon Diablo Arizona was still under debate about it's origin with many naysayers who believed it was the result of terrestrial volcanic action.

Today the Society is still very relevant in Meteoritics and is the world's leading authority on the subject. And I hope that by joining them, some of their collective knowledge and experience will rub off on me. Afterall, it did work to some degree here on CN! ;)

I would encourage anyone who is deadly serious about studying the science behind meteorites to join the Meteoritical Society. The cover charge is a bit steep (as are most "serious" academic organizations, even those open to the general public - which is rare), but the access gained to the latest developments in the field is surely worth the asking price. Such groups are rarely open to the general public, but meteoritics is a unique science in the sense that many "laypeople" are responsible for important discoveries. Major universities and government entities are limited to the meteorites they find in the field during expeditionary work. Meanwhile, many large private collectors are roaming the world buying up unclassified meteorites and having them classified - donating slices of the rare types (like Martians and Lunars) to science in the form of classification and they are exposing the world to meteorites that would have lain in the field to rot and never to be discovered. Even the most "high brow" parts of the astronomy/cosmology world have grown to accept the meteorite hunter who hunts for profit or personal gain, but shares his/her discoveries with science and the world. Science can either turn away potential breakthroughs, or embrace these laypeople. This appears to be a running theme in astronomy in general - not many other areas of science embrace the amateur so warmly. It's a wonderful thing IMO.

Clear falling skies!

MikeG

#2 molniyabeer

molniyabeer

    Confused and Asleep

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,503
  • Joined: 08 Jan 2005

Posted 10 April 2008 - 11:12 PM

Mike,

I've looked at the group, too, but wasn't sure I was ready to lay down the dues just yet. But there is a part of me that wishes I still had access to the petrology lab at Michigan State to look at a few thin sections. I'm working through Norton's "Encyclopedia" now and finding that a surprisingly large amount of the thin section work is reassuringly familiar (not that my old petrology prof would believe I actually learned anthing in that class!)

The real question is, are you still willing to associate with us now that you're part of the "in" crowd? At least you have to let us know when they start citing "Glassthrower, et al." in the journals! ;)

#3 Glassthrower

Glassthrower

    Vendor - Galactic Stone & Ironworks

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 18,610
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005

Posted 10 April 2008 - 11:34 PM

Hi Steve,

There are a couple of sources for prepared meteorite thin-sections on the open market and they are fascinating to study - so I am told and have read. I have never owned one, yet. Cross-polarizing studies are especially interesting because of the beautiful colors and patterns seen - this is what you typically see in those striking photos of microscope views. The same effect can be had with a loupe, a bright light (or sunlight), two polarizing filters, and a thin section. I had access to my stepson's microscope, but he repo'ed it! Now I have to buy another one. :lol:

I am waaaaaaaaay out of my league at the Meteoritical Society. It's probably a safe bet that I am the greenest freshman to walk in the gates in a long time. I have no academic credentials of my own, but an eager desire to learn. Hopefully they take it easy on me. I have browsed some of their journal publications, and it's pretty deep stuff.

Clear falling skies!

MikeG

#4 csa/montana

csa/montana

    Den Mama & Gold Star Award Winner

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 118,258
  • Joined: 14 May 2005

Posted 11 April 2008 - 12:13 PM

Mike: Congratulations!! :bow: :bow: :bow: We are honored to have you among us :grin:

Carol

#5 Glassthrower

Glassthrower

    Vendor - Galactic Stone & Ironworks

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 18,610
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005

Posted 11 April 2008 - 01:44 PM

Well, thanks for the kind words, but no honor yet!

I was just silly enough to pay $110 to join! :lol:


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics