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Olympus OM1

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#1 killerwolf

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 12:45 PM

i picked up a Olympus OM-1 a lil while ago at a yard sale and was wondering if its a good camera for film AP? and if so some pointers cause iam new to using this camera.

Thanks in advance for the help.

#2 Greyhoundman

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 01:06 PM

Excellant camera. There are also lots of good focus screens available for it. The mirror lockup is super good.

#3 ClownFish

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 01:15 PM

This is arguably the best 35mm SLR camera for astrophotography. Light weight, no battery needed, interchangeable focusing screens, mirror lockup, - it's a PERFECT camera for astrophotography.

CF

#4 killerwolf

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 07:58 PM

any guides on how to use this thing it looks complicated. And what would be a good film to start with iso 400?

#5 FLNightSky

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 10:00 PM

I started using print film, like FujiFilm ISO 400 you get at the camera store. It is cheap, and is easier to find someone who processes it (it is hard to find E-6 processing around here for me). The hardest part was being able to talk to the developer about how I wanted the film processed. After several 1hr places I found a Ritz camera where there was a guy who did a good job developing the film, and even recognised Orion. So yes, you can start with print film, as there is a lot to learn besides snapping the picture and work up to slide film later.

#6 JBull

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 11:06 PM

Good luck for you, The OM-1 is a prized camera for film astrophotography. Get a bulb cable to hold the shutter open. Thats really about it. A t-ring to attach it to your scope. Don't worry about the film speed settings when using a scope. Get a good film such as Kodak E200 or Fuji Provia or Sensia. The hardest part is focusing through the scope and camera viewfinder. Look for threads or web pages about hartmann mask.

#7 jrw11

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 12:11 AM

http://billyard.serv...m/Hartmann.html

Here is my favorite link on making the Hartman mask that Jeff mentioned.

#8 killerwolf

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 04:50 PM

thx for the link ive made one for when i use my DSLR. i picked up some fujifilm but all they had were single 800 iso and a 6 pack of 400 so i grabed the 800 hopfully it wont be to over exposed.

#9 ClownFish

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 05:05 PM

Depends on what you are shooting. For DSO's it won't be. 800 ASA may be slower than ASA 400 after 10 minutes of exposure. generaly the faster the film, the slower it is after long exposures!

CF

#10 Hambone

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 06:43 PM

Killerwolf, here is a site that has a owners manual for the Olympus OM-1. There is a lot of great info on the camera.Olympus OM-1 Owners Manual

#11 killerwolf

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 12:23 AM

link is dead :(

#12 Hambone

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 01:45 AM

OOPS Must have done something wrong? try this one. Olympus OM-1 Manual

#13 killerwolf

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 12:34 AM

cool thx, also what is this freazing your film all about??

#14 jrw11

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 01:28 AM

Freezing fim makes it last alot longer.

#15 ClownFish

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 01:36 AM

True. But in regards to Astrophotography there's some more history and that gives me a chance to babble this morning!

Back in the day (before 1990) there were not any really good film emulsions off the shelf. They all suffered from very bad reciprocity failure, which meant that the film tended to be less sensitive to faint light the longer the exposure.

To solve that problem, there were two techniques that astrophotographers did:

1. Freeze the film. You turned your camera into a "Cold Camera". This required you to make the camera air-tight and then had to replace the back with a home-built MOD that allowed you place dry-ice up against the film plane. You then pumped all the air out of the camera to prevent fogging and dew. The camera became a one-shot system as you could not wind the frozen film!

2. The second method was easier, and was called Hypering. The goal was to remove all the oxygen molecules from the film emulsion - which in-turn made the film more sensitive to faint light over time. In effect, it reduced the reciprocity failure. This was done by baking the film (low heat) in a bath of hydrogen. The hydrogen attached to the free oxygen and the resulting water vapor was dried out in the heat. The film (even the whole film canister could be done) was placed in a small pressure tank and then all the air was removed. Next, hydrogen (or a mix of H and HE for safety) was pumped in under a little pressure. The whole chamber was then placed in an insulated box (or Ice-Chest) along with a heating element (light bulb) and allowed to make for hours or days. There was even a commercial product by Lumicon that made this easy. Do-it-yourselfers also made chambers that worked very well.

Once treated, you had to use the film within hours. You could pack the film back in its canister along with some desiccant to keep it dry. Then you could keep it in your freezer for a month! But once you open it, it had to all be used within hours and immediately developed for optimum results.

The above two techniques also pretty much meant that all astrophotographers needed their own darkroom or access to one.

With the arrival of Fujichrome 400F Provia (now discontinued) and Kodak E200 - that all changed. These two films were (are) perfect for Astrophotography straight off the shelf.

CF


#16 killerwolf

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 04:14 PM

so if i freaze it i was told id still be able to wind it. Is this incorrect then?

#17 TxStars

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 04:28 PM

Once the film has been removed from the freezer for a half hour or so it works fine..
CF is talking about the old "Cold" cameras that used dry ice to chill the film while you exposed it.

#18 killerwolf

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 01:01 AM

cool i will give it a go. :)

#19 tommyhawk13

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 07:05 PM

Other than the cold camera method Clownfish mentioned, freezing film is a good idea for long term storage.
Professional film is usually the same exact film as store bought film, but it has been kept refrigerated to keep it "fresh"

I could be wrong, but for long exposure astrophotography, the off the shelf consumer grade Kodak E200 is just as good as the professional grade. I think that after a certain time during exposure, that little bit of an extra edge for the "professional" film doesn't matter.

Again, I could be wrong.

#20 Nightfly

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 08:51 PM

You raise a good question. Professional film offers more control over aging and tighter control of color balance. This may not apply as critically to astrophotography. I've used E200 and Elite Chrome 200 with no noticeable difference. Any change in color balance can be worked out in photoshop. Hopefully those would be small changes. I've gotten a bad roll of film before and it was not professional. Perhaps it was stored improperly (heat?) The supply chain for pro film is better controlled and not influenced by the local Walmart.

Freezing film will allow you to use the film well past the original expiration date. When E200 is on its way out, I will be filling my freezer, and it will not just be me!

#21 killerwolf

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Posted 09 May 2008 - 02:36 AM

so what are some good settings for taking photos of globular clusters? and settings for dso?

#22 ClownFish

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Posted 09 May 2008 - 08:07 AM

What film and what lens?
Will you be imaging at prime focus (without a lens)?
If so, what the scope's focal ratio?

Gobulars always do better with a stacked set of 2 or 3 shots. One quite short to show the center, and then longer exposures to capture the faint outer details. Then you stack them in photoshop. Otherwise you end up burning out the center.

DSO's need very long exposures, from 30 to 45 minutes at f/4. Much longer if you have a slower system.

CF

#23 killerwolf

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Posted 10 May 2008 - 01:20 AM

be going prime focus, scope is a 1000focal length F5

#24 donnie3

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 07:45 PM

i have a om1. i have not used it very much here lately. i just purchased a cg-5 mount with dual drive and wont to start wide field shots. would like to know what focus screens people use for this camera. i have the regular screen that came with the camera then later bought a no, 7 screen because i could not find a no, 8 anywhere. any suggestions please. one other thing, whats the best way to focus the camera for wide field. thanks, don

#25 Jeremy@za

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 02:39 AM

I have an OM4 and the only way I've been able to effectively focus it is to pick a bright star, like Rigel or A-Crux, and focus the camera until the blur on the screen is minimized. The OM4 doesn't have interchangable screens unfortunately :(

J


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