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Leupold Katmai 6x32

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#26 mooreorless

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 06:32 PM

Patric, I think there is a lot Viking blood [Sweden, Norway and Denmark] in all of us.:-)

#27 brocknroller

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 09:34 PM

Björn,

Ingmar Bergman is not one of my favourites, his films are quite "heavy"...
By the way, I suppose you are of swedish or scandinavian descent? The name Björn is usual in Sweden and means bear on swedish.

Regards, Patric


Woody Allen did an homage to Bergman with one of his few serious films titled "Interiors". Knowing Woody (I don't mean literally, though I have met him and played air hockey with him once), I expected a comedy. The film was so morose that I laughed, because it's as if he was trying to outdo Bergman by making a more depressing film. Plus, after "Annie Hall," I couldn't see Diane Keaton in a movie and not laugh.

I prefer Woody's comedies, though I'm not sure they would be understood in Sweden. I'm not sure they are even understood outside of NY and LA!

I had a girlfriend once whose litmus test for a prospective boyfriend was how he responded to a Woody Allen film.

She took her date to a Woody Allen film and if he laughed in the same spots she did and understood why it was funny in her after-movie question and answer interrogation, she would go on another date with him. If not, he was history.

I passed the test, but I ended up dumping her, because she didn't appreciate Fellini! How could anyone with a love of film remain indifferent to Fellini? I think she didn't like the subtitles.

If you've been watching the stock market lately, you know that the market has become a real Björn. :-)

Björn Yesterday (Judy Holliday was very funny in that film)

#28 sparrow

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 02:12 AM

Brock said:
"I had a girlfriend once whose litmus test for a prospective boyfriend was how he responded to a Woody Allen film."

Allen is a light weight. My own personal test is a Tarkovski film. If you don't get Tarkovsky you are obviously a philistine.

#29 brocknroller

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Posted 08 October 2008 - 10:57 AM

I have not seen a Tarkovky film. We did study Eisenstein in film school. Woody spoofed the Odessa steps scene from "Potemkin" (with the falling baby carriage) in one of his films. I saw the American remake of Solaris, which SF author Lem apparently wasn't very happy with.

There are some fine American films, but on the whole, I prefer foreign films. There's very little character development in American films. The emphasis is usually on plot and "action".

I like Italian films since the actors are so expressive, you hardly need to read the subtitles. In particular, I like the Italian films of Lena Wertmuller, who is of Swiss heritage, but born in Rome.

I also like the films of Akira Kurosawa. Some of his films were made into American or "spaghetti" Westerns. "Seven Samurai" became the "Magnificent Seven" and "Yojimbo" became the Sergio Leone western "A Fistful of Dollars".

Sorry for hijacking your thread Patric.

Björn to Be Wild

#30 Swedpat

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 07:25 AM

That was a very interesting report, Patric.
Could you also make a comparison, perhaps in images, of the relative size when folded down to their most compact state. I want to see how easily they would fit in a pocket.


Mark,

Excuse me, but actually I missed your request about this. I understand you are interested in comparing the Ultravid 8x20 and the Katmai 6x32?

Here are two pictures together with a pair of AA cells.

Regards, Patric

Attached Thumbnails

  • 2692452-Ultravid och Katmai 1.JPG


#31 mooreorless

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 10:19 AM

Hi Patric, This really shows the difference in size between these two binoculars.:-) It looks like I have the exact same rechargeable Sony batteries, mine are 2100 mAh rated and came with my Sony DSC-P72 camera. My batteries are not up to par anymore. Using 2 inch lenght of my batteries it looks like the Leica is about 3 inch wide [76.1mm] and the Katma is about 4" and 1/4" [108mm]wide. Measuring my shirt pocket the Leica would fit but not the Katma.The Katma would fit in a coat pocket.I am sure there are larger shirt pockets than mine out there.:-)Thanks for posting these pictures. :bow:

#32 Swedpat

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 02:45 PM

Steve,

My batteries are 2500mAh and came with my Sony DSC-H5 camera.
About the size of these two binoculars the Katmai isn't a true compact as the Ultravid 8x20. You can also notice the significant difference between the size of the eyecup-diameters.
With a mm-ruler I measure the max down-folded size of the Ultravid 8x20 to (width x thickness)68x40mm.

The Katmai I measure to (width x thickness)100x62mm, but with the the "holdings" for the strap the width it's ca 107mm.

Conclusion: The Ultravid 8x20 is the binocular you can put in every shirt-pocket, but the Katmai demands a quite large jacket-pocket. However; you can never get all advantages with a singel instrument. The 8x20 is really compact but isn't suitable for dusk and dawn, and also is too small for a comfortable holding. The 6x32 isn't really compact but is great for low-light conditions and has the holding and viewing comfortability reminding of full size glasses.

Regards, Patric

#33 mooreorless

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Posted 11 October 2008 - 08:16 PM

Patric, I bought Duracell rechargeable 2650 mAh and they work very good in my Pentax K100 Super D camera and the Sony one. I did consider the Sony H9 and Jostein helped me a lot on that. With a 80ED scope I wanted a DSLR camera, also Pentax had $100 off this camera last year to help me make up my mind.I sometimes wish I had bought a H5 or H9 :-) Sorry to go off topic.
I am sure the Katma is easier on the eye compared to the smaller exit pupil of the Leica.

#34 Swedpat

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 06:40 AM

Steve,

Yes, the size of exit pupil really makes sense for the viewing comfortability, as well the diameter of the eyecup. A wider eyecup covers the eye and helps to prevent stray light. Especially when use the binocular with eye glasses on. With very narrow eyecups (like an 8x20) you will then also notice the area round about the eyepiece which isn't preferable.

Regards, Patric

#35 Mark9473

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 01:32 PM

That was a very interesting report, Patric.
Could you also make a comparison, perhaps in images, of the relative size when folded down to their most compact state. I want to see how easily they would fit in a pocket.


Mark,

Excuse me, but actually I missed your request about this. I understand you are interested in comparing the Ultravid 8x20 and the Katmai 6x32?

Here are two pictures together with a pair of AA cells.

Regards, Patric

Many thanks Patric, that was quite instructive. I had actually forgotten about this too...
Something like a 6x32 with a much thinner central hinge & focussing wheel, or even better a double hinge design, would be the ultimate pocket binocular. The Katmai is just too 'fat' for that.

#36 sparrow

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 03:40 PM

Pat,
how do the Yosemites compare to your other small low-power bins?

For 90 bucks I'm tempted to try one.

Sparrow

#37 Swedpat

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 12:28 PM

Mark,

Yes, the Katmai is close to a full size bino in this respect. As well the eyecups/eyelenses and the focusing wheel are completely full sized. Therefore the holding is close to a full size glass, while the weight and shortness are not.

Regards, Patric

#38 Swedpat

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 12:39 PM

Sparrow,

For 90 bucks you cannot be dissatisfied. I have only two other small low-power bins, if you don't count in the Ultravid 8x20? It's really small but with "normal" magnification. There are no comparison between the Katmai 6x32 and the 2,3x40 Constellation View Wide-Bino, they are different animals. Otherwise I think you have the answer of the question in my first post in this thread.

Regards, Patric

#39 brocknroller

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 01:50 PM

Pat,
how do the Yosemites compare to your other small low-power bins?

For 90 bucks I'm tempted to try one.

Sparrow


Sparrow,

I was too, however, a word of caution about the 6x Yosemite Sam.

I found that the eyecups were too short, dadburnit! I had to hold my eyes away from the cottonpickin' eyecups to avoid blackouts.

Steve M. uses the upper eyebrow hold technique or UEHT(see his technical report on this :-), which seems to work for him, but for me, I couldn't get close to the eyecups without blackouts, I had to back off an inch or so, which made me lose some FOV and some steadiness since I wasn't resting the bin on my face.

This problem might be due to my farsightedness. I haven't read comments about others experiencing this same problem with the Sams, but if I experienced this, I'm sure someone else has too.

So I thought I'd pass that on. YMMV.

#40 mooreorless

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 03:38 AM

"Steve M. uses the upper eyebrow hold technique or UEHT"

Yep, I do this with my Swarovski 7x30 SLC also.

#41 sparrow

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 04:10 AM

Sparrow,Otherwise I think you have the answer of the question in my first post in this thread.

Regards, Patric


Sorry about that. In these long threads I often forget what the thread was originally about. Anyway I reread your first post and it sounds good.

So I ordered one from EO. I can return within 30 days no questions asked so it's a no-brainer.

Thanks,
Sparrow

#42 Swedpat

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 11:40 AM

Sparrow,

I am looking forward to know your impression of the Yosemite! For that price (less than half of the price here in Sweden) it would surprise me if you return it of any other reason than a faulty example.

Regards, Patric


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