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4 inch F15 Jaegers

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#1 BillinBallard

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 02:21 PM

I grew up on Long Island, which was the home to Jaegers. I used to love their catalogs, and read them cover to cover as I planned my next project. Well here is a photo of one of those projects: It is a 4" F15 scope which uses a coated Jaegers objective & has been my planetary scope for quite some time. It produces very sharp, planetary views on a velvety black background. It is very forgiving about seeing conditions and holds up to high magnifications very well. Star tests are classic, and false color is not a distraction.
I have built and rebuilt the tube several times over the years. The current configuration uses Black ABS to house the lens cell and the Vixen focuser. The tube is still the original aluminum. It has been cut down,completely flocked, and uses 5 baffles. The contrast is better than ever! The ABS fittings work great and look like they were made for this application.
Even with all the scopes I currently own, there is still a place for this venerable steed.

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#2 Bob W6PU

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 06:22 PM

That is a thing of beauty Bill, you should be very proud of it! I also grew up in Levittown, Long Is., went to Hempstead H.S. 1950-54!

Cheers!
Bob in NM

#3 Chris G

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 11:06 PM

It is most certainly an impressive scope!! Thanks for posting.

#4 BillinBallard

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Posted 21 January 2005 - 12:15 AM

We had a bit of a break in the cloud cover tonight, so I was able to haul out the scope & get in a few quick peeks at Saturn from my deck. The jet stream is right overhead and the skies were unsteady, but at least it was clear. Views with a 13mm Televue plossl were very pleasing. Saturn's orb was allibaster white with a distinct orange band. Cassini's division was clear and the rings stood out againt a black backdrop. On good nights, the scope can easily handle a 7mm with no image degradation, but not tonight. Still I was very pleased.

P.S.

Bob, good to hear from another Long Islander. I graduated from Smithtown in '72 and went to Hofstra freshman year. I'm a Seattle boy now...but still miss the summers on the Island.

#5 BillinBallard

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 09:22 AM

The other night we had clear, steady skies and Jupiter was well placed. I hadn't used this scope in a while, and thought it would be the perfect opportunity. I had forgotten just how good this scope really is. The belts and polar caps were distinct & detailed. The GRS was very clear. The images unquestionably have better contrast than my 4" APO.

#6 rwiederrich

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 09:51 AM

The other night we had clear, steady skies and Jupiter was well placed. I hadn't used this scope in a while, and thought it would be the perfect opportunity. I had forgotten just how good this scope really is. The belts and polar caps were distinct & detailed. The GRS was very clear. The images unquestionably have better contrast than my 4" APO.



I must admit, that is surely a fine instrument.

I also noted from your local that that was the Puget Sound in the background.

I live over by Belfair. How are your skies???

Rob :smirk:

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 02:57 PM

Back in the 60's I used to enjoy going through Edmund and Jaegers catalogs. (still have them) I ordered a lot more from Edmund, but did buy from A.J. occasionally and was always satisfied with their products. I was really tempted to buy one of their refractor objectives and construct my own scope. Never did, but it's nice to see the good use you've gotten out of yours. I always heard they were very good! :refractor:

#8 BillinBallard

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 07:39 PM

Rob;
You have keen eyes: That indeed is Puget sound in the background. I'm in Ballard, about 5 miles north of downtown Seattle. Some years have been better than others, but we are clouded over at least 80% of the time from September through April. If I can get 1-2 nights in per month during that period I feel lucky. Last December we had an unusually clear/dark night and I was able to resolve M1 in my 6" refractor. (That was enough to get me through the rest of the month).
We have mag 3.5 skies, which generally settle down around midnight. The 4" refractor does a wonderful job on the planets, but not deep sky. The 6" refractor delivers great views of globs & open clusters. However, galaxies are just faint & fuzzy.
I keep thinking how nice it would be to have a place to observe east of the mountains, out of the marine environment.

#9 rwiederrich

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Posted 09 June 2006 - 10:16 AM

Rob;
You have keen eyes: That indeed is Puget sound in the background. I'm in Ballard, about 5 miles north of downtown Seattle. Some years have been better than others, but we are clouded over at least 80% of the time from September through April. If I can get 1-2 nights in per month during that period I feel lucky. Last December we had an unusually clear/dark night and I was able to resolve M1 in my 6" refractor. (That was enough to get me through the rest of the month).
We have mag 3.5 skies, which generally settle down around midnight. The 4" refractor does a wonderful job on the planets, but not deep sky. The 6" refractor delivers great views of globs & open clusters. However, galaxies are just faint & fuzzy.
I keep thinking how nice it would be to have a place to observe east of the mountains, out of the marine environment.


FAint fuzzies are still alright in my book, cause I then can image them, and, as you may know, that makes it all the better.

3.5 mag skies, that is borderline isn't it? I don't really know how to determine magnitude of the sky????

Over here in the Olympic forest region, it is a bit darker. :smirk:
Andrameda galaxy is a naked eye object.

If you are ever this way, you are more then welcome to share my EP.

Rob

#10 Scott Beith

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Posted 09 June 2006 - 12:12 PM

That is a beautiful scope!

#11 rwiederrich

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Posted 09 June 2006 - 03:52 PM

That is a beautiful scope!


Hey Scott, ya gotta know that us NW CN'ers gots some nice large refractors.

Hey I just learned that I have mag 6 skies or better.

I'm very lucky I think.

Rob

#12 Scott Beith

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Posted 10 June 2006 - 08:07 PM

Rob,
I agree Sir.


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