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Til I Saw Her Face, Now I'm a Believer!

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#301 BSJ

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 05:03 AM

It is a Baader cap. Was sealed inside the box with everything else.
 

#302 ibase

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 05:29 AM

Brian thanks for the additional info. The included original Baader 2" cap is indeed a very welcome development, your Hyperion zoom (version 4?) may be part of the anticipated ramp up in terms of quality control and included goodies, making the BH zoom a better killer eyepiece; pls do let us know how it performs or if there are any QA issues. Thanks!

Best,
 

#303 ibase

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 10:00 PM

Just maybe, vendors may be keeping tab on Hyperion zoom threads in the forums, like this quote from the Agena AstroProducts website:

.. .. "The new Baader Hyperion 8-24mm Clickstop Zoom continues the Hyperion tradition of delivering top-of-class performance and quality, at very reasonable prices. Zoom eyepieces have earned a lackluster reputation over the years, due to their compromises in optical design and execution. We think the Hyperion zoom will surprise many jaded zoom users with its combination of performance, quality, and novel features.

Some highlights of the Hyperion Clickstop Zoom:

* Consisting of 7 elements, the Hyperion optical design delivers outstanding sharpness and color correction over its field, even with fast telescopes.Users are reporting that the Clickstop Zoom matches the performance of their best fixed focal length eyepieces!.. .."


Best,
 

#304 ibase

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 11:07 AM

With the weather cooperating tonight, here's the 1st ever zoom Moon pic I've taken on 8/30/09 11:40pm with the Hyperion zoom set at 8mm on a William Optics Megrez 102ED refractor with the Canon Rebel XS DSLR:

Posted Image

Will try to improve next time by using a remote switch (just clicked manually above) and getting better focus with the camera's "live view."

Best,
 

#305 ibase

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:09 PM

The Hyperion zoom-SkyScout-SS Connect troika, the new tech savvy beginner's GPS enabled finder gear:

Posted Image

Novices never had it so good, now you can have a stand-alone handheld device (also connectible) that you point to the skies to either look for (50k database built in/internet upgradeable)or also to identify some shining star you're interested to know the name of, that once you've set your sights, zoom out to 24mm on the Hyperion, center, zoom in to 8mm max, and you're there in no time. The SkyScout has a 5-line LED screen up front and can be connected to a Nexstar scope for auto GPS location/time entry, I've used it on the SE mount and it works great - you control the scope via the connected SkyScout - press a button here and the scope slews to the celestial object. Quite cool really.

The SkyScout used to cost around $400 but I got it brand new for $185 by using a 15% off virtual coupon; This was a year ago, it's cheaper now, or you can get the lastest 2009 version from our CN sponsor for $199, for the IYA Limited Edition SkyScout which has a free extra IYA edition memory card. It even talks (pleasant female voice), via included earphone/or accessory external speaker and I've got 2 memmory expansion cards that you can plug in about beginners and stars. Get one, you'll like it. :)

Best,
 

#306 ibase

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 11:42 PM

The Hyperion zoom-SkyScout-SS Connect troika, the new tech savvy beginner's GPS enabled finder gear:..


Posted Image

The SkyScout Personal Planetarium shown here with a $5 external rechargeable speaker (with glow-in-the-dark base); perfect for outreach/sidewalk astronomy, as a learn-while-you-listen tool, in the same way that the Hyperion zoom is also great and very convenient to use in such events. Good team-up!

Best,
 

#307 nejedj71

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 12:21 PM

Here are the results of the drift test method of determining True Field of View (TFoV) for each of the five click stop settings of the Baader Hyperion 8-24mm ClickStop-Zoom used with a Zhumell Z10 Deluxe Dobsonian Reflector (1250mm / f4.92).

The test was conducted on August 31, 2009 in Northeast Wisconsin. The persons manipulating the dobsonian reflector or recording the times remained the same for each test.

The star chosen for this drift test was Antares. Antares was viewed at least four if not five times at each click stop setting. The longest time recorded at each setting was the final time used. This was done to better insure the star drifted across the actual full diameter of the field of view, rather than across a chord.

The experiment and formula used for the experiment was obtained from two sources:

Astromart Article “Drift Testing to Determine Your Eyepiece's True Field of View”
By Herbert Kraus - 11/27/2004

Astronomy Hacks “Astronomy Hacks #57” By Thompson & Thompson

The formulas used were:

TFoV = T * 0.2507 * 0.9031
(Divide by 60 to present in arch seconds or degrees of an arch.)

The Results:

08mm: 122 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 27.62 arch minutes (or .46 degrees)
12mm: 150 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 31.96 arch minutes (or .53 degrees)
16mm: 184 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 41.66 arch minutes (or .69 degrees)
20mm: 210 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 47.54 arch minutes (or .79 degrees)
24mm: 220 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 49.81 arch minutes (or .83 degrees)

Conclusions:
My wife was the timer. I drove her insane because I really wanted to use the full diameter drift test instead of starting the star in the middle of the field and then multiplying the result times two. This caused me to start the test over numerous times if it appeared I would not get the full diameter (not easy). So, when I say I took five readings, those are five readings that I finished and felt acceptable because of how they looked in the eyepiece and how close the actual numbers were. I won’t tell you how many times I started over… My wife went home and had a stiff drink. I am going to go back out tonight or tomorrow night and try this again. However, I am going to center the star and then let it drift to see if there is any change.

I also purchased the 21mm with both FTRs. Brenda and I compared views extensively last night between the zoom and 21mm with FTRs. They appeared almost identical at every setting. We liked how easy the eye positioning was with the nice twist up eye guard. I also did not like how often there was flaking present on the eyepiece from switching out the FTRs in the 21mm. I will probably sell the 21mm and FTRs soon since I was so happy with the zoom.

Hope you found this interesting. Please feel free to correct any mistakes I am making.
 

#308 mapofthedead

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 12:49 PM

Thanks for the information nejedj71, although I must admit to being rather ignorant about drift-tests and TFoV. How do your results compare to the stated AFoV for the eyepiece as being 50° @ 24mm and 68° @ 8mm?

Here are the results of the drift test method of determining True Field of View (TFoV) for each of the five click stop settings of the Baader Hyperion 8-24mm ClickStop-Zoom used with a Zhumell Z10 Deluxe Dobsonian Reflector (1250mm / f4.92).

The test was conducted on August 31, 2009 in Northeast Wisconsin. The persons manipulating the dobsonian reflector or recording the times remained the same for each test.

The star chosen for this drift test was Antares. Antares was viewed at least four if not five times at each click stop setting. The longest time recorded at each setting was the final time used. This was done to better insure the star drifted across the actual full diameter of the field of view, rather than across a chord.

The experiment and formula used for the experiment was obtained from two sources:

Astromart Article “Drift Testing to Determine Your Eyepiece's True Field of View”
By Herbert Kraus - 11/27/2004

Astronomy Hacks “Astronomy Hacks #57” By Thompson & Thompson

The formulas used were:

TFoV = T * 0.2507 * 0.9031
(Divide by 60 to present in arch seconds or degrees of an arch.)

The Results:

08mm: 122 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 27.62 arch minutes (or .46 degrees)
12mm: 150 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 31.96 arch minutes (or .53 degrees)
16mm: 184 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 41.66 arch minutes (or .69 degrees)
20mm: 210 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 47.54 arch minutes (or .79 degrees)
24mm: 220 seconds * 0.2507 * 0.9031 = 49.81 arch minutes (or .83 degrees)

Conclusions:
My wife was the timer. I drove her insane because I really wanted to use the full diameter drift test instead of starting the star in the middle of the field and then multiplying the result times two. This caused me to start the test over numerous times if it appeared I would not get the full diameter (not easy). So, when I say I took five readings, those are five readings that I finished and felt acceptable because of how they looked in the eyepiece and how close the actual numbers were. I won’t tell you how many times I started over… My wife went home and had a stiff drink. I am going to go back out tonight or tomorrow night and try this again. However, I am going to center the star and then let it drift to see if there is any change.

I also purchased the 21mm with both FTRs. Brenda and I compared views extensively last night between the zoom and 21mm with FTRs. They appeared almost identical at every setting. We liked how easy the eye positioning was with the nice twist up eye guard. I also did not like how often there was flaking present on the eyepiece from switching out the FTRs in the 21mm. I will probably sell the 21mm and FTRs soon since I was so happy with the zoom.

Hope you found this interesting. Please feel free to correct any mistakes I am making.


 

#309 Tank

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 01:19 PM

To my calculation the drift test indicates
8mm = 72 degree AFOV
12mm = 56 degree AFOV
16mm = 54 degree AFOV
20mm = 50 degree AFOV
24mm = 44 degree AFOV

All seem about right except for 12mm and 16mm settings! Seems to me a little more AFOV!
 

#310 nejedj71

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 02:04 PM

If I may ask. How did you come up with these numbers for AFOV Tank?

I feel pretty good about following the steps to get the other numbers. I just have not figured out yet how to translate what I have into AFOV.

Thanks in advance.

To my calculation the drift test indicates
8mm = 72 degree AFOV
12mm = 56 degree AFOV
16mm = 54 degree AFOV
20mm = 50 degree AFOV
24mm = 44 degree AFOV

All seem about right except for 12mm and 16mm settings! Seems to me a little more AFOV!


 

#311 nejedj71

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 02:20 PM

I think I got it myself. TFoV = AFoV / magnification(telescope focal length in mm /eyepiece in mm)

Example for the 8mm: .46 = X / (1250 / 8mm). Solve for x.

I will go out tonight and take another shot at verifying these numbers. Two cents from those in the know is appreciated.
 

#312 andydj5xp

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 02:23 PM

To my calculation the drift test indicates
8mm = 72 degree AFOV
12mm = 56 degree AFOV
16mm = 54 degree AFOV
20mm = 50 degree AFOV
24mm = 44 degree AFOV

All seem about right except for 12mm and 16mm settings! Seems to me a little more AFOV!


I'm also thinking about the 12mm result. My measurements

see here

give 60.7° for this focal length. All other values are very much in agreement with mine.

Andreas
 

#313 nejedj71

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 03:00 PM

Thanks Andy. My wife will love the fact that I am going to haul her out again tonight for some more tests :') She actually loves astronomy and tolerates my initial obsession with finding the right eyepieces at the right price for what we want to do.
 

#314 ibase

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 01:04 AM

Nejedj71, I gotta hand it to you (and your wife too!), that's a great experiment you've conducted on the Hyperion zoom's TFOV at it's various focal length settings, and I sure found it to be extremely interesting if not entertaining with the comprehensive details about the methodology you've employed and the fact that your wife has teamed up with you on this as timer - you're very lucky to have a partner who shares your interest in astronomy/astro gear and takes the time to assist you in your experiments. Well done sir, and thanks a lot for sharing it with us! :bow:

Best,
 

#315 ibase

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 01:34 AM

Having brought out the calculator and computing the AFOV from Nejedj71's experiment results and others who have done the same yields this table of AFOV results:

Nejedj71 Andy Tony
8mm - 71.8 72.8 72
12mm - 55.2 60.7 56
16mm - 53.9 54.4 54
20mm - 49.3 50.7 50
24mm - 43.2 43.4 44

All three results seem to jive and are very close with the exception of that for the 12mm. From my own observation by just peering through the Hyperion zoom in daylight, the AFOV seems to open up real wide from 12mm to 8mm and by guesstimate only the 12mm AFOV is closer to 60 than to 55 because a jump from 55 (12mm) to 72 (8mm) degrees is too big a difference if we were to go by with visual estimates only.

In the same way that the view opens up real wide from 12mm to 8mm, the opposite is true when going from 20mm to 24mm, the reduction in fov is just as pronounced like the 12-8. In between, say from 12mm to 16mm to 20mm or from 20mm going down to 16mm to 12mm, the increase/decrease is just gradual and these indeed are reflected in the figures cited above.

Just throwing in my own qualitative take/estimate on the AFOV matter, quantitative results/observations are of course more scientific/accurate.

Best,
 

#316 ibase

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 03:58 AM

Thanks for the information nejedj71, although I must admit to being rather ignorant about drift-tests and TFoV. How do your results compare to the stated AFoV for the eyepiece as being 50° @ 24mm and 68° @ 8mm?


James, thanks for chiming in; there have been many estimates regarding the AFOV of the Hyperion zoom at different focal length settings; one thing is certain, it's lower than the official published 50-deg. @ 24mm and bigger than 68-deg. @ 8mm.

Best,
 

#317 ibase

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 04:06 AM

To my calculation the drift test indicates
8mm = 72 degree AFOV
12mm = 56 degree AFOV
16mm = 54 degree AFOV
20mm = 50 degree AFOV
24mm = 44 degree AFOV

All seem about right except for 12mm and 16mm settings! Seems to me a little more AFOV!


Tony, I agree, it sure looks bigger from visual observations; seems like Andreas has got it just about right with respect to the 12mm AFOV at 60.7 degrees by his reckoning.

Best,
 

#318 ibase

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 02:26 PM

With the weather cooperating tonight, here's the 1st ever zoom Moon pic I've taken on 8/30/09 11:40pm with the Hyperion zoom set at 8mm on a William Optics Megrez 102ED refractor with the Canon Rebel XS DSLR:

Posted Image


Here's an astro pic that you'll not see in the glossy pages of asto mags/books, because this is how a waxing gibbous almost full Moon DSLR 8-mm zoom shot looks like when the view is clouded out by tonight's hazy atmosphere, just had to take it, sorry about that. :tonofbricks:

Posted Image

Best,
 

#319 ibase

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 12:06 AM

Somebody sent me a message in an e-group referring to this little thread that we have here and said:

"Holy C**p! I just looked at the thead again, it's alarmingly massive! What a joy! Are you sure you don't work for Baader Planetarium? LOL! I'll have to finish reading it tomorrow. That is, if it ever ends. Amazing interest shown."

My reply was:
"LOL, no, absolutely no connection whatsoever with Baader Planetarium; it just so happens that I feel strongly about the Hyperion zoom (my favorite #1 EP of all) than any other in my 30+ eyepiece collection, all acquired through the last year since I started in this, including Naglers (5,9,12mm's), Brandon, BO/TMB's, UO flat-top/volcano tops, Faworski, Meade Research Grade ortho, Vixen, Baader Genuine Ortho, Hyperion fixed FL, Televue/Celestron/Meade/Stellarvue plossls, Siebert Observatory, William Optics zoom, Ultimas, Agena/WO wide angles,GSO, etc.

The Hyperion zoom has shown that zooms are not the lightweights that they used to be thought of and may have finally put to rest this long-time misconception and archaic view."

Best,
 

#320 Michael_Swanson

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 01:34 AM

The above WO binoviewer setup is of course just a mock-up since I have only one Hyperion zoom (the other "dummy" is the 21mm). Has anyone tried to binoview with the Hyperion zooms to success? Thanks.


Hi Hernando,

I have two of the Hyperion Clickstop zooms and a Baader Maxbright Binoviewer. They are an excellent combination. About the only concerns would be:
- If your interpupillary distance is less than about 60mm (or you have a large nose) you may not be able to center your eyes over both eyepieces.
- Be sure both zoom eyepieces are the same generation. In particular, the original Clickstop zoom does not match the current zoom at the detent positions. Difference in eyepieces will make it difficult or impossible to merge the images.
- Be sure to hold the eyepiece holders stationary when you zoom the eyepieces. Otherwise the eyepiece holders will twist, changing the focus of each eyepiece individually.

Best regards,
Mike Swanson
Author of "The NexStar User's Guide"
Author of "NexStar Observer List"
http://www.NexStarSite.com
 

#321 ibase

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 03:02 AM

The above WO binoviewer setup is of course just a mock-up since I have only one Hyperion zoom (the other "dummy" is the 21mm). Has anyone tried to binoview with the Hyperion zooms to success? Thanks.


Hi Hernando,

I have two of the Hyperion Clickstop zooms and a Baader Maxbright Binoviewer. They are an excellent combination. About the only concerns would be:
- If your interpupillary distance is less than about 60mm (or you have a large nose) you may not be able to center your eyes over both eyepieces.
- Be sure both zoom eyepieces are the same generation. In particular, the original Clickstop zoom does not match the current zoom at the detent positions. Difference in eyepieces will make it difficult or impossible to merge the images.
- Be sure to hold the eyepiece holders stationary when you zoom the eyepieces. Otherwise the eyepiece holders will twist, changing the focus of each eyepiece individually.

Best regards,
Mike Swanson
Author of "The NexStar User's Guide"
Author of "NexStar Observer List"
http://www.NexStarSite.com


Hi Mr. Swanson! I can't believe we have such a distinguished, erudite, and much highly regarded visitor here in this thread, it is much appreciated sir! I have your book, the bible of Nexstar owners, The Nexstar Users Guide, a goldmine of info about Nexstars, I love it, not to mention your online website which is such a haven for Nexstar owners who might need help with their scopes.

Thank you very much for the info about binoviewing with the Hyperion zoom, you've articulated what's been lingering in my thoughts about going in this direction because I have the version 2 generation of the HypZoom and if I were to purchase a new one at this time, I probably will get the 3rd version which as you say may not exactly be a good working match if they were used together in a binoviewer (mine is the WO kit). Nevertheless, I appreciate very much your taking time to post a message about it and will bear in mind the intricacies and possible complications you've pointed out to when venturing into binoviewing with zoom EP's. And I am quite sure that your post will benefit others who might be following this thread and are interested also in zoom binoviewing.

Wishing you more power in all your pursuits, a good day to you sir and take care!

Best,
 

#322 ibase

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 03:42 PM

Here's an astro pic that you'll not see in the glossy pages of asto mags/books, because this is how a waxing gibbous almost full Moon DSLR 8-mm zoom shot looks like when the view is clouded out by tonight's hazy atmosphere, just had to take it, sorry about that. :tonofbricks:


This brings us to my 1st astro pic ever, predictably a moon shot because it's easiest to image, and it's not exactly glossy page candidate either, something of an ugly duckling (dull, out-of-focus bla bla bla), but hey, it may be an ugly duckling but it's MY ugly duckling! :p :jump:

Posted Image

Taken on my 1st scope, a Nexstar 6SE using the Celestron NexImage Solar System Imager, a webcam type of camera that you plug into the diagonal in place of an eyepiece and record images on your laptop/computer.

But you can make an image enhancement, like this, which a very helpful forum member did for me (Tel, thanks!) at that time:

Posted Image

Now that's a more palatable 1st ever astro pic, shall we say a beauty of a beginner's maiden shot! :whee:

And that's the beauty too of PhotoShop, you can tweak your images to your liking, so saddle up and shoot those Hyperion zoom shots!

Best,
 

#323 ibase

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 02:48 PM

What do you do on one of those drizzly cloudy nights and your Hyperion zoom is just lying there unused? Read a book! :)

Posted Image

If you live in the city or urban setting with the unwanted light pollution and skyglow and all, you'll find Uncle Rod's book an invaluable reference that will let you do celestial walking tours of stars/DSO's that you never thought possible or only available when you go to a dark site.

It includes sections on different telescopes in the context of urban viewing, as well as techniques and projects; and a 4 to 5 walking tours for each season.

Uncle Rod's writing style is easy going buy authoritative, profusely seminal and quite inimitable with that distinct refreshing 'twang that is very engaging; one of his timeless classics.

Next stop, more books.

Best,
 

#324 ebusinesstutor

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 03:46 PM

You know, Hernando, your ravings about the Hyperion Zoom are interfering with my buying fun. I was looking forward to finding a very cool eyepiece case and filling it with lots of funky eyepieces.

But now that I bought the Hyperion Zoom as a result of your cheerleading, I find I really don't need more eyepieces and don't have enough eyepieces to fill the very cool large eyepiece cases.

Just a wide view like a 36mm plus my Zoomo and I'm set.

Of course, you have probably saved me a lot of money. :)

Maybe I can still justify a small case to hold the Hyperion Zoom, my barlow, the two plossls that came with my second scope and a few other accessories.
 

#325 ibase

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 10:56 PM

You know, Hernando, your ravings about the Hyperion Zoom are interfering with my buying fun. I was looking forward to finding a very cool eyepiece case and filling it with lots of funky eyepieces.

Sorry about that! Buying eyepieces and trying them out is fun, but in my case, the problem is I tend not to let go of any after I get them. :foreheadslap:

But now that I bought the Hyperion Zoom as a result of your cheerleading, I find I really don't need more eyepieces and don't have enough eyepieces to fill the very cool large eyepiece cases.


Been hearing more and more instances where the Hyperion zoom is THE only eyepiece being used and owners being happy and content with no/less desire to add more EPs. Shades of global domination? :o

Just a wide view like a 36mm plus my Zoomo and I'm set.


Agree! I picked up a Siebert 36mm Observatory Series because I wanted to step up from my current cheap (~$30-40@ in Ebay) long focal length EP's, UWA 30mm and GSO Superview 42mm:

Posted Image

Chanced upon a $100 Siebert36 in the used mart so I jumped on it (the owner said the reason he's selling is because of one word - Ethos). Have not yet received mine to show so instead, here's the 36's in a stock picture as shown from the official Siebert website with a 2" binoviewer (Look at that humongous eye lens! Can't wait to try it out.):

Image removed per TOS

Of course, you have probably saved me a lot of money. :)


So glad to know that!:jump:

Maybe I can still justify a small case to hold the Hyperion Zoom, my barlow, the two plossls that came with my second scope and a few other accessories.


Sounds like a plan, I myself would be content with just the Hyperion zoom (in fact it's the only one I use most of the time) if I were made to choose only one from the herd. Keep on zooming!

Best,
 


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