Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

orion ed on planets

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
7 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----
  • topic starter

Posted 17 November 2003 - 07:51 PM

hey guys, i've searched all the threads, and maybe i've missed it, but i haven't seen an observing report on planets. the ed80 is a scope i'm thinking about getting, and any input on planetary performance would be greatly appreciated!! thanks

best,
Chris

#2 Tom T

Tom T

    A Father, A Teacher, A Pioneer

  • *****
  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 36,397
  • Joined: 26 Feb 2002

Posted 17 November 2003 - 08:00 PM

Chris,

Well, take into account that it's *only* 80mm. But that being said - it's an excellent 80mm. Mine gave me spectacular views of Luna and Saturn this last weekend. (I'm somewhat tiring of mars <g>)

I could easily see the cassini division, the crepe ring, the shadow on the rings and banding on saturn.

The moon - shadows are pitch black, and the lunar soil shows a remarkable variance in hue and color. Albedo markings clearly stand out.

Very very high contrast with an amazingly low amount of scatter. Space around saturn was as black as I've ever seen it, and there was no noticable false color on saturn at all, and only the very very smallest amount on the moon (comparable to my TV102 or SDF).

For the price, this scope has *vastly* outperformed everything I expected of it. Is it perfect? No. But given the price point, it's pretty amazing.

Tom T.

#3 Bill Grass

Bill Grass

    Prince Regent

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,665
  • Joined: 07 Oct 2003

Posted 17 November 2003 - 10:16 PM

Hi, Chris. I second what Tom said. I also have the ED80; it's a fabulous little scope! :waytogo: I still look at Mars when I'm out early enough, and I can still make out the polar cap & surface details on it, as small as it is. I can also clearly see the slightly gibbous phase of the planet. I don't detect any false color around it, either. I highly recommend this scope; I don't think you'll be disappointed!

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----
  • topic starter

Posted 17 November 2003 - 11:47 PM

thanks for the feedback, guys, sounds great....i'm considering myself to be in the market for a small refractor, and this one is looking more and more like a great deal. i haven't heard a bad thing about it yet, other than a return here and there. and those were either replaced by orion or someone found out it wasn't the "magic" or "perfect" scope they pegged it as. so what power have you guys been able to push it to? i've heard some pretty good numbers, nothing incredible(it's still 80mm, after all), but i'm just wondering if the reports i've heard are consistent. thanks again for helping out, i know i ask a lot of questions, but hey, it's a compliment to all of you and your experience :bow:. and if these clouds would just break for ONE evening, i'd be outside instead(obviously :grin: )

best,
Chris


#5 Bill Grass

Bill Grass

    Prince Regent

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,665
  • Joined: 07 Oct 2003

Posted 18 November 2003 - 01:17 AM

I looked at Saturn a few nights ago using 200x. That's actually the maximum I can get due to my eyepiece collection. (I use a 6mm Ortho eyepiece with a 2x Barlow.) I've read other posts about people using even more power than that with no image breakdown on this scope! :bigshock:

Looking at Saturn the other night, everything was still pretty sharp at 200x. But Saturn was near the zenith. I swung around to Jupiter as it was rising, and 200x really wasn't that great because Jupiter was so low in the sky. Man, that atmosphere was boiling!

200x on tight double stars yields good views. The Double-Double looks really nice through my scope at this magnification. The components are cleanly split with black space in between.

Keep on askin' those questions...that's how you learn! :D

#6 Tom T

Tom T

    A Father, A Teacher, A Pioneer

  • *****
  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 36,397
  • Joined: 26 Feb 2002

Posted 18 November 2003 - 08:20 AM

Bill,

Are you using the Ultima barlow? (or the Orion version?)

Actual magnification of a barlow is somewhat dependent on where the focal plane of the eyepiece sits in conjuntion with the eyepeice, but if memory serves, the Ultima actually delivers closer to 2.3x on most combinations.

Chris - the most magnification I've used so far is 200x (nagler 3-6 zoom at 3mm) and it's held up extremely well. I suspect I could easily push it a bit higher.

Tom T.

#7 Jarad

Jarad

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,420
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2003

Posted 18 November 2003 - 09:46 AM

I will give a third pro opinion on the ED-80. I have only taken mine to 120x so far (5mm is my highest power eyepiece at the moment), but it gave a pretty nice image of Saturn. Also, I think thescope is quite decent, and the few minor problems that are likely to show up are easily fixable.

I do think a lot of them arrive slightly miscollimated. I read a nice way to check te collimation: leave the tube cap one, and use a standard Cheshire eyepiece with the circle brightly illuminated - you will see 2 reflections of the "doughnut" from the 2 lenses. If the 2 doughnuts are on top of each other so that they merge into 1, the collimation is perfect. If they are offst from each other, it is off, and you can adjust the focuser to align them. The other issue is a slight rubbing sound in the focuser, which was addressed in another post here earlier, also easily fixable.

Again, for the money, this is a great little scope.

Jarad


#8 Bill Grass

Bill Grass

    Prince Regent

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,665
  • Joined: 07 Oct 2003

Posted 18 November 2003 - 10:15 AM

Are you using the Ultima barlow? (or the Orion version?)


I'm using the Ultima. Yeah, I've heard that it generally yields a little over 2x. I guess that would bring me to about 230x; not too bad for an 80mm scope! :jump:


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics