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planets

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 21 November 2003 - 03:01 PM

Can anyone get a good view of Saturn with their binoculars, if so, list the specifications? Also, how are the views of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and the Moon

#2 EdZ

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Posted 22 November 2003 - 07:23 AM

Binoculars are not the right tool for viewing the planets. With 15x-16x you will just be able to tell

there is a separation between the rings and the disk of the planet, if your eyes will allow it.

Mars is tiny.

Venus can sometimes be noticed as to what phase it's in.

You can see the moons of Jupiter.

I don't know my way around the moon, but it looks nice

edz

#3 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 22 November 2003 - 04:17 PM

With my 22x60 binos I can see the phases of Venus, Mars as a disk, Jupiter as a disk (I often think I can see some banding) and several moons, and Saturn with separation between rings and disk. It has been a while since doing any lunar viewing so I will have to pass on saying anything about that except the views are very sharp and major craters easily identified.

With all due respect to the binos, I am able to see more detail on planets and moon with my refractor but then again I am able to bump up the magnification with the scope.

My binos give wider field of view, and a very sharp view it is with no false color. I use the binos more because they are so very easy to set-up and it is more pleasing to view with both eyes (simultaneously of course ... hee hee).

Nick

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 02:37 AM

My binoculars have a magnification of 25, and I couldn't see the separation of rings from the disk of Saturn. Although, I think my problem is that I'm not using a mount, and it's hard to keep what I'm observing steady

#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 06:51 AM

I don't believe you mentioned what the aperture is on your binos, but with a magnification of 25x you should be able to see rings of Saturn (at least with aperture of 60mm or better). Using a mount of one type or another may help.

When I owned a pair of Oberwerk 15x70s (I believe it was 15x) and then a pair of 16x70 Fujinons I used a tripod. The Fujies were especially heavy and hand-holding was out of the question.

I have since built a parallelogram mount and that has been a great leap forward. Now I have much more flexibility and am able to view while laying on the lawn lounger in the backyard. However, as Ed previously pointed out, a scope will most likely provide more detail with planetary viewing (unless you are lucky enough to have binos with aperture of 125mm or above .... and then I am only guessing that you will be seeing more detail as I have never had the pleasure of looking through real "giant" binos).

Give the tripod a try. Nick

#6 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 01:02 AM

my binoculars have an aperature of 100mm, and I just saw Saturn as a disc, with part of it's rings visible. The trick is to hold the binoculars steady, which requires either resting your arms on a flat surface or using a tripod. Hand Holding them isn't that difficult, except it's very hard to hold them steady enough to observe whats in your view

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 27 November 2003 - 11:33 AM

You have got to be really good to hand hold 25x100 binos (from what I have read about them). Definitely look into a good steady tripod and/or a paralleogram mount with good tripod/pier.

In addition, from what I have read about the 25x100 binos, the best views will be in the center of the field. If you are trying or getting Saturn out towards the other 25 to 30% of the field of view then you probably won't be seeing any ring separation.

Get the tripod and good luck with clear skies. Nick

#8 brocknroller

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Posted 02 December 2003 - 07:37 PM

I've have 15X70s and 20X80s, and Saturn looks like a golden football, same as it looks in my Nikon 8X32 SE. The only binocular I've had that could resolve the rings of Saturn was the Pentax 20X60 PCF V. I could also see bands on Jupiter. Never tried them on Venus or Mars, though I'm sure Mars would have been a disk at this past opposition since it was a disk in my 10X35 E2. The Moon was also impressive with the Pentax, but it showed lots of false color, as did bright stars and Jupiter.

The best views of the moon I've seen with binoculars have been through my Nikon 8-16X40 XL Zoom at 16X. While my Burgess 20X80 gives a larger image scale, the brightness is blinding, and craters and rills are not as sharp as the Nikon Zoom (I can handhold both the 20X80 and the Nikon at 16X). However, like Edz said, binoculars are not well suited for planetary viewing. Heck, planets are even hard to view with telescopes except under very steady skies, and in the case of Mars, every 60,000 years. ;-)

Brock

#9 KennyJ

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Posted 03 December 2003 - 01:09 PM

I agree that "planet viewing" -- apart from that of the moon and following the movements of Jupiter's moons --is really out of the scope (no pun intended ) of binoculars.

When viewing the moon through binoculars at magnifications in excess of around 12x ,I advocate either using moon filters , masking down larger objectives to reduce brightness , exit -pupils and chromatic abberation or actually buying a dedicated small exit -pupil bino specifically for the purpose.

To this end , on the moon , something like an inexpensive 20 x 50 might well provide as much detail and pleasure as a more expensive 20 x 80 for example .

Clear Skies --Kenny

#10 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 03 December 2003 - 10:42 PM

For your experience with observing planets, do you immediately recognize the planets. Like, for instance, if you were looking at Saturn and had no idea it had rings, would you be able to discover the rings, or would you just notice something looks strange?

#11 KennyJ

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Posted 04 December 2003 - 02:46 AM

From admittedly very unscientific experiments from my own light -polluted backyard using inferior scopes and eyepieces in average seeing conditions I've found that I need around 30x magnification to instantly identify Saturn as a miniscule visual version of what I would describe roughly as a "black and white" ( more accurately off -white and dark grey ) version of photographs one might find of it taken at much higher magnifications.

All the other factors I mentioned apart from magnification itself would doubtless influence the very minimum value of magnification at which this would be discerned , as also would individual visual acuity.

Clear skies -Kenny



#12 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 06 December 2003 - 01:21 AM

I just bought a pair of Oberwerks 22x100 and I could clearly separate Saturn from its rings, and see Triton.

#13 Pat G.

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Posted 06 December 2003 - 08:38 AM

With my 22x60 binos I can see the...



By any chance Nick, would those binos be the Miyauchi Pleides :question:

Pat G.

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  • 25978-Miyauchi Pleiades.jpg



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