Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Herschel 400 Observing Guide - Book Review

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
3 replies to this topic

#1 mloffland

mloffland

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2,510
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2004

Posted 16 December 2009 - 01:40 PM

Herschel 400 Observing Guide - Book Review

#2 David Knisely

David Knisely

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,031
  • Joined: 19 Apr 2004

Posted 16 December 2009 - 02:14 PM

I feel the criticism of the finder chart issue in this book may be largely overblown. The first thing to have when going after the Herschel 400 is a decent large-scale atlas (Sky Atlas 2000.0, Uranometria 2000.0, etc.). It is assumed by O'Meara that the reader has one. When I did the Herschels back in the early 1980's (I hold certificate #12), we had *no* guidebook (only an object list with positions). I largely relied on the old Becvar ATLAS OF THE HEAVENS 1950.0, and even had to write in one of the Herschel open clusters that was not plotted on that atlas. Even so, with my old 8 inch f/7, I managed to find all of them (even the "non-existent" nebula NGC 1990 around epsilon Orionis, which was basically scattered light in the scope). Clear skies to you.

#3 Feidb

Feidb

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,973
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2009

Posted 16 December 2009 - 04:58 PM

Very good review! I surely don't need the book as I've already done the Herschel 400, but it would be a nice companion anyway. I am working on the Herschel 400-2 right now, and wouldn't mind seeing a book on that!

#4 turtle86

turtle86

    Mr. Coffee

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,867
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2006

Posted 16 December 2009 - 06:12 PM

Nice review. This book is a bit different from the other O'Meara books. It is organized by month (with 7 nights for each month) to plan viewing sessions; not a bad way to structure things, though I'd have to shoehorn June, July, and August into other months since I live in Florida. Additionally, he goes into less depth for each object than in his previous books, which is totally understandable given the sheer number of objects. However, as always, his descriptions are worth reading. If you like his other books, you'll want this one too.


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics