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Advantages of film over CCD/TTL astrophotography

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#51 d.sireci51

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 11:39 PM

Hey Dave, I've got a HP PC w/ windows vista hom prem. bought
a Meade Lunar/planetary imager. Didn't work, fact it crashed
my internet explorer twice! "DSLR & imagers" Not going there! I have used Olympus SLR OM-1 and OM-2 for astrophotograghy since 1978. I can email you some of my work. For Deep space I use my shutter setting "B" with a shutter release cable. 10 to 20 minute exposures work for me. I don't use GPS or Goto, just R.A. & Dec drives w/ a 4
way hand control. Manually guide with a Celestron 102 Refr. Kodak gold 200 and some Fuji films, Some slide & Black and white I like best. Experimentation Is ofter a good teacher. Don't use the camera's meter if you want good pixs!
Set you exposure durations manually. Most eyepiece projection Lunar shots will come out good with 1/60 or 1/30
shutter speeds. Planetaries are different depending on the
Scope your using. Hope this helps some. Keep trying, dont give up. LOL Best Regards, D.Sireci

#52 WillCarney

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 01:02 PM

I recently got a Canon 10D to play with. I have not given up on film just yet but did notice a big advantage over the DSLR. My 35mm film cameras are no where near as heavy as my DSLR. The Canon DSLR is at least four times heavier than the film cameras I have. If you go to DSLR from film you might have to take this into account if your mount can't take too much extra weight.
William

William

#53 wrather1

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 11:00 AM

Good points, all - I was planning on getting an adapter and using my TMB130SS with my old Ricoh 35mm SLR, which like William says is MUCH lighter than my Canon 30D. The idea of hand-guiding a 20-minute exposure is a little scary; I think PHD could easily guide a 10-minute exposure so I'll try that first.

#54 d.sireci51

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 07:36 PM

Hey Warther1, I use 10 minutes, 15 max on my hand guiding for several reasons. First,after 15 min. the
light & air pollution in my area will take over. If I use a
skyglow than I have to increase the exposture time to get just about the same results. Lastly, the longer Im guiding the greater the chance of fatique and lost tracking. Clear Skies, D.S.

#55 Leesha

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 06:51 AM

Question for everyone here...How would you focus a film camera when you cannot see what your focusing on??

#56 WillCarney

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 08:11 AM

Question for everyone here...How would you focus a film camera when you cannot see what your focusing on??

The 35mm SLR is focused just like you take pictures during the day, by eyesight. You have to look through the prism. I do use the three triangle focuser aid in front of the telescope to help. Get a focus on a brighter star first if trying to image a dim object.
William

#57 TxStars

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 10:38 AM

I focus with a piece of ground glass and Tak FM-60 focusing microscope on a bright star 60x at the film plane gets the job done.

#58 wrather1

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 11:48 AM

I use a Stiletto focusing device for DSLR AP - couldn't that also be used for a film camera?

#59 WillCarney

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 01:25 PM

I use a Stiletto focusing device for DSLR AP - couldn't that also be used for a film camera?


ANY focus mask placed in front of the telescope will work. Using your eyes through the camera you need a bright star to focus. My masks have three triangles equally seperated and are placed in front of the telescopes. It will work if it's in front of the telescope since most to all film cameras you look through to focus.
William

#60 d.sireci51

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 11:57 PM

With my Olympus OM-1 I use a #8 focusing screen on a bright object but at odd angles it can be a bugger! I've never
explored the use of the 3 triangle focusing mask. Would
anyone care to explain how they work? Thanks much. Clear skies all, D.Sireci :question:

#61 tommyhawk13

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 10:59 AM

I use a Stiletto focusing device for DSLR AP - couldn't that also be used for a film camera?

Absolutely! You just need the Stiletto body for the make of camera you have.

#62 WillCarney

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 03:11 PM

http://en.wikipedia....i/Bahtinov_mask

http://www.optcorp.c...id=13014&kw=etx 90&st=2

http://www.optcorp.c....aspx?pid=13014

http://www.focus-mask.com/

http://www.focus-mas..._Templates.html

It's called a Bahtinov mask. I just use hard matte board and make my own to fit my telescopes. They go before the objective in a refractor or at the tube opening on a reflector. I make the more simple three hole and make them triangles instead of circles. They work fine.

William

#63 d.sireci51

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 08:10 PM

Thank you William, I will check those links on the Bahtinov
mask. Just looking for an easier way to find the true focus.
I like clear/shape pixs. Clear skies, D.Sireci

#64 WillCarney

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:38 PM

Using those masks is about as simple as you get with film cameras. About the only way really if you want a good focus. I use the three hole type but cut triangle's instead of circles. There easier to make than the multicut versions. Just look through the camera till the three patterns are one. Simple. Film cameras have to be done visually. I use this method for my film cameras.

Here's the thread that has several film pictures. The ST-120 was focused by the three triangle mask over the objective.

http://www.cloudynig...ev=#Post3666808

I did get a little field rotation from the mount not quite aligned to the NCP but focus was good.

William


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