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Zeiss MiniQuick 5x10 monocular Messier Marathon...

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#1 Rich N

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 12:53 AM

A few years ago I did a Messeir Marathon (a partial one because of clouds in the morning) with my Zeiss MiniQuick 5x10 monocular

I found my post to Sci.Astro.Amateur (Usenet) made on March 23, 1999. A note about M31, in March M31 is in the west near sunset. If you try to early the sky is still quite bright. If you wait too long M31 is low and into the haze.

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Here is my Messier list for the MiniQuick:

M31 hard because of the bright background
M42 easy
M45 easy
M35 not too difficult to see fuzzy patch
M36 hard to see fuzzy patch (thin clouds kept going by Auriga)
M38 hard to see fuzzy patch
M37 harder to see fuzzy patch
M41 relatively easy
M47 hard to see but the sky was better
M48 ? I think I saw it but I'm not certain
M13 not too difficult (Mark Wagner also saw M13 with the MQ)
-------------------------------------------------

Rich

#2 Rich N

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 08:12 AM

Here is a picture of two Zeiss monoculars and ball point pen.

Top: Zeiss 6x18 monocular
Center: Zeiss 5x10 MiniQuick
Bottom: cheap ball point pen

The Zeiss MiniQuick also has a pocket clip. You just can't see it in the picture.

Rich

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  • 389070-Zeiss MiniQuick 004r.jpg


#3 Rich N

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 12:18 PM

The Zeiss 6x18 monocular is interesting. It focuses very quickly and easily from infinity to less than 1 foot and all points in between. The front end slides in and out. It's a fine little telescope and a fine little "long distance" magnifier.

I guess to make the sliding focuser rugged enough for frequent use under difficult conditions this monocular is a little thicker than one would expect for having an 18mm objective.

It's a really handy, serious monocular. It's not a toy.

Rich

#4 kc6zut

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 01:15 PM

Cool! Those monoculars are interesting. I once picked up a little plastic thingy mono for a couple of bucks just for grins and was amazed to find that it had an actual poro reflector (made with mirrors not a prism) assembly. For the cheap price it worked rather well. I never thought of actually using it for astronomy. How wrong I was maybe I'll give it a try. Thanks for the inspiration.

#5 Rich N

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Posted 29 March 2005 - 03:13 PM

Thank you!

The 6x18 Zeiss monocular is quite a bit more effective at showing DSOs than the 5x10 Zeiss MiniQuick.

Rich

#6 Swedpat

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 02:30 AM

Despite only about the twice in light gathering power of the naked eye I think you will benefit from using even the MiniQuick for astronomy. The magnification and the darker background is an advantage. But how does it work with glasses? It has to be a quite small ocular lens.

#7 Rich N

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 04:12 AM

The eyerelief if is fine. The apparent field isn't huge so I have no problem seeing the entire field when wearing my eye glasses.

The MiniQuick image is sharp but the brightness is noticably better with the larger Zeiss 6x18. However, the MiniQuick is in a much more slender package.

Rich

#8 Swedpat

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 02:50 PM

The small "Zeissis" (Do I say so?) are real beautiful. Actually I have had a 6x20 Classic. However, the question is if it isn't better to get the 4x12 model instead of 5x10? Slightly lower power but 80% wider real FOV, and 125% better brigthness. 4x is maybe almost to low power, but for theater, sports and stadium-use, and other activities there you will get closer (and don't need extreme details) without loose the overwiew it will be a good choice I think.

#9 Rich N

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 08:36 PM

The small "Zeissis" (Do I say so?) are real beautiful. Actually I have had a 6x20 Classic. However, the question is if it isn't better to get the 4x12 model instead of 5x10? Slightly lower power but 80% wider real FOV, and 125% better brigthness. 4x is maybe almost to low power, but for theater, sports and stadium-use, and other activities there you will get closer (and don't need extreme details) without loose the overwiew it will be a good choice I think.


The larger aperture 4x12 would be a better if you don't need a very slim (pen like) monocular. I not sure how much more compact the 4x12 is compared to the 6x18. I like my Ziess 6x18, but it soesn't fit in my shirt pocket like the MiniQuick.

Rich

#10 Swedpat

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 01:49 AM

Rich!

According to the technical specifications I read the 4x12 has the same diameter as 6x18 but is shorter. It's also visible at the picture of it.

Therefore I don't understand why Zeiss are not make a 4x version of the 18mm instead? It would give it a great brightness with 4,5mm exit pupil. The price of the 4x12 is also almost the same as the 6x18 so they could easy make it 4x18 instead. Or is it some special reason they want to keep the 3mm exit pupil in both?...

http://www.zeiss.com...5256D05005C3486

#11 Rich N

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 04:22 AM

That's a good question. I'm not sure why they kept to a 3mm exit pupil.

The Zeiss 8x20 monocular is interesting. But, a little expensive.

The MiniQuick doesn't have a very bright image but it is a nice crisp image. The little (5x) increase
in image size helps with reading signs or identifying things that are a little too small for the unaided eye.

Thank you for the Zeiss link!

Rich

#12 Swedpat

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 06:25 AM

The Zeiss 8x20 monocular is interesting. But, a little expensive.
Rich


There are two main reasons I like moderate power in small monoculars: 1: You get fairly bright image despite small aperture. 2: A monocular is more difficult to hold steady than a binocular. That was also the reason I choose the Classic 6x20 instead of 8x20. I now know I chosed right for me. But I regret I then sold it. Actually to a friend, but he likes it very much and is not very willing to sell it back...

#13 Rich N

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 07:33 AM

I was playing with my Zeiss 6x18 monocular a couple of hours ago. When you looking at something, like the LCD screen of my notebook, at about one foot the edge to edge sharpness of the image is outstanding. At distance the edges are a little soft because of, I assume, field curvature.

Rich

#14 Swedpat

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Posted 13 April 2005 - 08:20 AM

The difference between the old (out of production now)6x20, and the new 6x18 is that the 6x18 has much shorter focusing range (6x20 has about 1,8 meters if I recall right) and I think the 6x18 has better coating. They are all fantastic, however. The Classic 6x20 has the best and sharpest optics of all of the optical instruments I have had, and the 6x18 is likely even better.


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