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What was your first binocular?

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#51 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 02:31 PM

Hola Che! I went to Yokohama , with a 10 day layover, in 1975, free, in return for dropping bathythermographs every two hours , for Scripps Institute of Oceanograpy, from APL ships, Oakland-Yokohama- San Pedro. One was President Taft, as I recall. I went to Nikko, saw the see no evil, speak no evil, hear no evil monkeys carved over the royal stable, went to the sword museum, watched the early AM Tsukiji expensive fat tuna for sushi, etc. auction . I bought about 20 binoculars, including some Fuji Meibo 7 x 50 IF, which were about $60 each,with leather case, and one of the 10 x 70 x 6.5 deg Nikon. I was naive about customs entry, and only because the customs man was a good guy, did I escape the need for a formal customs entry, with broker, at San Pedro.

I recall your posting of a picture of your Telaggio, asking for help in identifying it.

I tested the binoculars by watching albatrosses and shearwaters. There was little else to do but read, between drops, once I had explored the ship. The 10 x 70 x 6.5 deg. Nikon was not what I had hoped for. There was more color error than the 7 x 50 Fuji, as I recall. But the wide field is impressive. Nikon should revive it,and they or Fuji should make or subcontract something similar, with SP or ED, modern multicoatings, etc. I sold it, probably to a fishing boat, or at RTMC. Last year, there was a lady selling one at the RTMC swap meet. I was tempted. Perhaps I was too demanding in 1975-76. But I had too many toys. Her price was about four times what I had paid. There is a WW II Nikko 10 x70 x 7 deg, with a Zeiss -style body, uncoated, of course. Their case is wood. I sold one to a Japanese collector a few years ago.

#52 hm insulators

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 02:58 PM

A Tasco fixed-focus binoculars that I won from a Los Angeles radio station. They were useless for astronomy, although they were OK for scouting glass insulators on telephone poles. They became out-of-whack and I found another pair at a garage sale. That pair ultimately went out of collimation too, so now I have a pair my mother gave me that had been sitting around unused at her house. They're not great astronomy binoculars, but far better than those Tascos.

#53 brentwood

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 05:07 PM

The very first of the 50-60 that I have now was a Dolland 8x25 when I was about twelve, as a Christmas present.
I felt the same about them as 'Ralphie' did about the Red Ryder BB gun that he got for Christmas in the now classic film, 'Christmas Story'.
Binoculars were very expensive back then, so I did not get the ones with the really big lenses, the 8x30!
A few years later, the first 'Golden Age' of ridiculous binoculars began as the newspapers had ads for ever increasing 'powerful' binoculars.
15x50, 20x50, 25x50, 30x60, 35x60 ( I borrowed one of these when I flew to Florida to watch the launch of Apollo 11, the collimation was so bad that I was the only person in the viewing area that could see the actual launch and the hotels on Cocoa Beach at the same time!) 35x65, 40x70 and culminating in the magnificent but totally useless 45x75.
The ads would feature a drawing of the White Cliffs of Dover and the caption 'See 21 miles'. I suppose you had to go to France to use them!

#54 marcelof

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 07:43 PM

Hola Gordon.Does not seem so good to you nikon? I have understood that their eyepieces are Erfle.This yes, the diameter of its eyepieces is like the diameter of the objectives of small binoculars, aprox 30mm.EL telaggio is strange. There are very few and not if it is of military use.I have not found any information on its history.
Very good your story.

#55 spindleshanks

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 03:07 AM

My Nikon action ex ! 10x50

#56 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 03:15 PM

The Telaggio appears in the prewar Zeiss catalogs. The design goes at least as far back as the 1920's. I have two Delfort 18x 50. Those have very sharp images. I saw one which had been coated, and told the wife of the owner ( the owner had cancer), in as diplomatic a way as possible, that the Delfort would interest me very much. But after her husband died, she let a shady dealer dispose of the collection. He could not recall the fate of that fine, postwar coated Delfort from the '20s or '30s, nor the large collection of 2 x 2 foot or larger female nudes her husband had taken in the 1930's, which lined the wall of his workshop/ photo studio. He was the longtime projectionist at a local movie house.

Were you the person who showed a Telaggio against an elegantly furnished interior background in Buenos Aires(?) a few years ago in the forum?

I shall confine my comments about the Nikon 10 x 70 x 6.5 deg. widefield to what I already wrote. I am working from memory, and do not know of any specimens to use for renewed comparison with binoculars available now. I saved the phone number of the RTMC swap meet seller from last year. Maybe she yet has it.

#57 peter k

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 03:37 PM

My first were a gorgeous pair of 7x50 Leitz that my father brought back from WWII. (Thanks Dad, wherever you are.) I never used them for astronomy, but they got a lot of birding use. I vividly recall how terrific they were for twilight birding. Oh the joy of a 7mm exit pupil and young, non-astigmatic eyes. The objectives grew fungus while I was a grad student living in Florida, and they were eventually stolen.

#58 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 04:17 PM

Most binoculars in Florida( or any warm, high humidity environment) should be stored in an airtight container, together with silica gel dessicant contained in bags improvised from doubled women's nylon hosiery/stockings/panty hose.

I saw a beautiful WW II Zeiss 25 x 100, the seldom seem aluminum bodied version, whose Viennese owner, emaciated in 1945, had received in return for a loaf of bread. The binocular had been taken from the huge flak tower in Vienna, which still stands.

I met him in 1970. He was a professor in Forida. Already fungi had begun to grow inside. I bought it from him a few years later. I no longer own it. The Fujinon marine binoculars have internal dessicant bags.

#59 KennyJ

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 04:25 PM

I dare suggest that what may put some males off purchasing womens' panty hose for such purposes is a fear of disbelief by the sales person :-)

Kenny

#60 Andresin150

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 04:30 PM

Now, what was your last binocular?? :)

#61 peter k

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 04:39 PM

I dare suggest that what may put some males off purchasing womens' panty hose for such purposes is a fear of disbelief by the sales person :-)

Kenny


I'm thinking the salespeople--at least in some areas--are pretty used to men buying pantyhose: link

#62 marcelof

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 10:24 PM

NonGordon, was not I. I also obtained it of strange way. A elderly person, than took root in my city, underwent difficult circumstances and decided to come off itself her collection. Thus I bought the Nikon 10x70 and telaggio. And a Zeiss of trench and others escaped to me 16x50. Your language costs a little to me. I did not understand that it passed with the Nikon 10x70 that you bought in Japan.
Thanks to respond, Che….

#63 Bensi

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 04:21 PM

The first binocular bought with my personal money was a beautiful Zeiss 8x30W Jenoptem DDR-Jena.
I bought in year 1980 in a optical shop in my hometown.
Instead, the first binoculars I used as a boy in 1972, was my father , Zenith 10x50 Made in Japan, but his death in 2007, fell into my hands.
The first binoculars I have family photos and memories is that of my great-grandfather in sending you a picture of a 1930 ... Dekarem Zeiss 10x50.
Hello

Attached Thumbnails

  • 3834111-Mio bisnonno Giovanni e il fratello Attilio with zeiss 10x50.jpg


#64 marcelof

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Posted 29 May 2010 - 09:58 PM

Bensi, you have a museum of binocular?

#65 Bensi

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Posted 30 May 2010 - 01:31 AM

I'd love to do a small historical museum that tell the history and evolution of binocular of the WW1 related to the history of binoculars.

But it is not easy.

Bye

#66 pogobbler

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Posted 30 May 2010 - 11:12 PM

My first pair-- well, a family pair, technically, though I used them the most-- were a pair of Japanese made Focal 10x50s bought at, of course, Kmart in probably the late 70s or very early 80s. They were coated, MgFl, no doubt, from the blue color, and I recall them working pretty well, though I didn't have anything to compare to at the time. I strongly remember the smell of them (or the case, probably, as much as the binos themselves) and found a pair of Japanese made Celestron 20x80s I bought used a few years ago had that exact same smell. Brought back memories.

#67 brentwood

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Posted 31 May 2010 - 12:47 AM

From what I remember about the Focals is that they were the best quality mass produced, department store binocular sold in the 70s & maybe 80s. They were certainly better than the cheap & nasty Bushnell & Tasco that those stores normally sold.

#68 Simon S

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 01:24 PM

I must say the Yashica's and Swifts seem to be by far the best Japanese poro's of the 70's. My 8x30 Yashicas are breathtaking to be honest.

#69 Swedpat

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 02:48 PM

Apart from a toy binocular when I was very small, my first real binocular was a 10x50 Extra Wide. I described it in THIS thread.

Regards, Patric

#70 Simon S

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 04:26 PM

Thanks Patric, I think most of us have fond memories of our first pair, though I know mine were very poor looking back.

#71 orbitaljump

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 09:32 PM

My first binocular was a Pentax 6x15 mini porro....similar to the Nikon Mikron 6x15, which is better known.

#72 anyan

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 06:24 AM

I am new in Cloudy Nights forum & need help.

Does anyone know about Sears(brand name) Binoculars? Where these binoculars made? Are they good binoculars?
Thanks.

#73 Grimnir

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 06:50 AM

Simon

>I must say the Yashica's and Swifts seem to be by far the best Japanese poro's of the 70's.

Err ... Nikon surely.

Graham

#74 BarabinoSr

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 12:41 PM

Mine was a pair of 7x35 Tasco's wide Field.Great binoculars that I used mostly for astronomical purposes. G :cool:

#75 Alan French

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 05:54 PM

In the early 60s I got a pair of Monkey (Montgomery) Wards 10x50s. I used them for birding, and, starting in 1965, to help me find things with my 60mm Unitron. (The finder on the Unitron was too small to show much of anything.) I didn't actually treat myself to a decent pair of binoculars until around 1976, when I got B&L 7x35s and 7x50s.

Clear skies, Alan


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