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Skip binos - buy an SV Nighthawk?

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#1 Apracticalguy

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 02:01 PM

After all my questions and reading yalls responses....wonder if I should head over and purchase an SV Nighthawk scope....what are your thoughts....why do we want binos anyway? :confused:

Are binos really our answer for gaining astro satisfaction :question:

#2 Craig Simmons

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 02:08 PM

The Nighthawk is a good scope. I have it's predecessor the AT1010. Binos provide a correct image for two eyed use. Binos are self contained. No extra EPs, diagonals and other accessories to haul around. Very grab n' go.

#3 Erik D

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 02:33 PM

We had a discussion of Big Binos vs. Binoviewer a few month back. It was start by Rich N. You might want to look it up.

I have several refractors from 40mm to 152 mm APO but I find myself using 80 and 100mm binos for 95% of my observing. I grap one and concentrate on enjoying the correct image views instead of juggling EPs.....

I take out the 6 in F8 APO on exceptional dark clear nights...usually no more than a few times per year. Go with scope if you do more lunar/planetary observing but keep in mind you can get a very good quality 20X80 for around $200. Less than the cost of a single Tele Vue Radian or PanOptic.




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#4 Scott Beith

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 02:40 PM

I use both on a regular basis. I find that I use my binos to help find things for my scopes. I also carry a set of binos with me in my truck just in case I end up on a dirt road on a dark night...
They complement one another, but for me neither one could replace the other. I use the scopes 70%, binos 30% for my observing.

#5 EdZ

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 02:45 PM

The "Best Of" links give all the comparisons between Binoculars, mono-scopes and binoviewers.

Just as a refresher.

Binocular viewing provides about 20% gain in lightgathering and about 40% gain in contrast.

A 20x80 binocular is providing the light gain equivalent of a 20x88 scope
A 20x80 binocular is providing the contrast equivalent to a 20x95 scope

A 25x100 binocular is providing the light gain equivalent of a 25x110 scope
A 25x100 binocular is providing the contrast equivalent to a 25x118 scope

My AT1010 is 78mm 480mm f/6.2> Nighthawk the same?

For ease assume 80mm 480
with a 24mm eyepiece you get 20x80 delivered to ONE eye.
In binocular equivalent thats the same as
a 20x73 for light gathering
a 20x68 for contrast.


Scopes do allow for varied magnification, that's why I have several scopes. It's definitely not an either/or thing. BUT, You need a bigger scope to get binocular equivalents.

edz

#6 lighttrap

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 04:28 PM

Where I think binoculars really shine is as a totally self-contained, handheld method of taking in huge swaths of the sky. That's why I prefer smaller binoculars. I rarely observe without ready access to some 8x, 10x or 12x binoculars. They're useful as finders. They're useful for starhopping. They're useful for learning the sky. And they're useful to challenge what you can really see with small power. And, of course, they're also extremely useful for terrestrial viewing.

If you're only considering large, mounted binoculars, then a scope is a viable option. But, rather than thinking only in terms of binos or a scope, I'd encourage you to think in terms of one complimenting the other, and make your choices accordingly.

Mike

#7 Brian B.

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 04:56 PM

You should definitely get a handheld pair of binos, regardless of what you do with the telescope purchase. I use my binoculars all the time, on their own, or with a telescope. Just the other night, I found a great way to use them, with a friend's telescope (Orion Starmax 102) and a green laser. We had driven up to our dark site, on the other side of the island, and all of a sudden it clouded completely over (of course). I put the SV102 away after about 2 hours, and then all of a sudden, a small window in the clouds appeared to the south. I scanned it with my 10x50s, and found plenty to look at, like Omega Centauri, Eta Carinae (I think), and loads of clusters around Crux. I sat in the chair, holding the binos in one hand, and the laser in the other, and pointed out each object for my friend, while he targeted them in his scope. It worked out very well.

Get them both!

Brian B.

#8 btschumy

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 05:28 PM

The "Best Of" links give all the comparisons between Binoculars, mono-scopes and binoviewers.

Just as a refresher.

Binocular viewing provides about 20% gain in lightgathering and about 40% gain in contrast.


Shouldn't that be 10% gain in light gathering? That's what I remember and your examples below support that.

A 20x80 binocular is providing the light gain equivalent of a 20x88 scope
A 20x80 binocular is providing the contrast equivalent to a 20x95 scope

A 25x100 binocular is providing the light gain equivalent of a 25x110 scope
A 25x100 binocular is providing the contrast equivalent to a 25x118 scope



#9 EdZ

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 06:48 PM

The examples reflect 20% gain and 40% gain.

All gain is calculated on the area of the aperture.

Not only articles that I've read by others but also tests that I've performed with one-eyed vs. two eyed viewing confirms the 20% light gathering gain.

edz

#10 matt gray

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 07:56 PM

Apractical,

Get some decent inexpensive bino's and an astrobook and have some fun learning the sky and where to look when you finally do get a scope. Buying a decent pair of bino's is very PRACTICAL as you will probably allways use them with or without a scope.

regards

matt

#11 btschumy

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 08:44 PM

Right you are. Temporary brain malfunction.

#12 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 07:11 AM

A agree with all of the aforementioned suggestions. You should definitely get a pair of bins regardless of anything. Answering the question whether these bins are going to be a primary observing instrument can tell you what size and how much money you would like to spend.

#13 chascar

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 09:02 AM

I would have to agree I love all my scope and would not give them up ,but the use of binos is two fold for me they allow for the enjoyment of large swaths of the night sky and are ready at a moments notice truely grab and go. second it is with binos that you will learn the sky and incojuntion with your scope later star hopping and or aquiringlocations of objects you wish to further explore with a scope.


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