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periodic tables

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#26 rboe

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 03:18 PM

I had to find out the half life of Silver but irradiation it a neutron howitzer. It's just a few seconds.

#27 E_Look

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 03:50 PM

In the old days in New York City, you had to memorize he name, symbol, and basic properties of the first twenty elements, recognize the first fifty, and be responsible for up to fifty and some "other common" ones on tests.

#28 star drop

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Posted 03 August 2012 - 01:47 PM

A revised table update (attachment).

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#29 E_Look

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 08:41 PM

Hey Ted! Glad you revived this way cool thread!

I still make use of the one in my HP-50g calculator, though mainly to calculate molecular weights.

#30 star drop

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 10:08 AM

Hey Ted! Glad you revived this way cool thread!

We do have to strive to maintain some sort of scientific presence in the Off Topic Observatory. At least once in a while :grin:.

#31 Skylook123

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Posted 12 August 2012 - 05:57 PM

I am old enough to have bought, new, all of Tom Lehrer's LPs over fifty years ago. I hate to think of all the time I played "The Elements" and checked them off a periodic table.

Some more entertaining methods of pondering the PTOE:

Tom Lehrer Illustrated PTOE

Harry Potter Does The PTOE

#32 star drop

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:15 PM

New and improved attachment. We've only had a few hours of observing time over the winter so I kept busy with this.

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#33 starman345

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:42 PM

Thanks Ted, I need to print this out and spend some time with it. I find it interesting. Its been a long time since high school and as I recall we didn't spend much time on it.

#34 star drop

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 07:45 PM

Latest update attachment.

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#35 star drop

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 07:46 PM

The flip side.

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#36 Ian Robinson

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:00 PM

I prefer my SI Chemical Data Book version's of the PT, very well used and dog-eared from many years of use while studying chemistry and chemical engineer and as a handy work reference.

#37 FirstSight

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:33 PM

Here's a really good (free) dynamic periodic table - click on any element and it pops up a subpage with a comprehensive, yet concise page about that element and its properties and uses. There's also a nice wikipedia page with a table of isotopes for each element in the periodic table - the main page includes a small periodic table to help orient you, but the real value of this page is in the contents index, which contains links to a comprehensive page of isotopes for each element, with a separate table/page for each sequential 14 elements in the periodic table. There's a colored box for each of the principal isotopes of any given element; click on the respective colored isotope box, e.g. C-14, and it brings up a subpage about that specific isotope similar to what the dynamic periodic table page I linked to above does for each main element (except the dynamic periodic table and the wikipedia page are from different sources, despite some resemblances).

#38 star drop

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:44 PM

Thank you, Chris. I have bookmarked your second link.

#39 star drop

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 10:44 PM

My most recent update. I had to do something since coming this fall it will be fifty years that I have been working on it. Sadly there are still many discordant values in the literature making extrapolation a big challenge. If there are improved values they are not openly shared unless one has a subscription to various scientific journals.

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#40 Ian Robinson

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 03:15 AM

In the old days in New York City, you had to memorize he name, symbol, and basic properties of the first twenty elements, recognize the first fifty, and be responsible for up to fifty and some "other common" ones on tests.

Heck , you had it easy .... we had to be able give the number electrons, protons and neutron for the everything up to and including the first 5 rows , and sketch the orbitals and infer how the element and ions thereof will bond. 



#41 csa/montana

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 01:20 PM

grin.gif  Back to topic, please.


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#42 E_Look

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 07:31 PM

 

In the old days in New York City, you had to memorize he name, symbol, and basic properties of the first twenty elements, recognize the first fifty, and be responsible for up to fifty and some "other common" ones on tests.

Heck , you had it easy .... we had to be able give the number electrons, protons and neutron for the everything up to and including the first 5 rows , and sketch the orbitals and infer how the element and ions thereof will bond. 

 

 

... That was in kindergarten.  We had to sketch f-orbitals by the first grade.  (Boy that was hard!  What WERE those "innergrowl" things with the curly thing in front of it??)

neener.gif



#43 kkt

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 07:37 PM

We had to memorize some of the elements, about 20 or so, but not most of them.  On most of our tests, the periodical table was available as a reference source.

 

Regarding the multiplication table, we were required to memorize up to 10 x 10 in elementary school.  But our tests in high school were timed in such a way that no one could finish them within the time allotted, and memorizing up to 20 x 20 helped us do the problems faster and thus get higher scores.



#44 E_Look

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 12:52 AM

For just about every undergraduate general chemistry exam, except when you were supposed to memorize certain major facts about the most common elements, you get a periodic table with your exam.

After Exam I or Quiz I, you were going to be asked questions for which memorizing stuff won't be of much use, so a table is provided so you can look up what you need to answer the question.

 

New York State used to give out to high school students this *WONDERFUL* periodic table completely accessorized with ancillary tables and graphs and charts, four pages from the folding of a large sheet, the first of which is the periodic table, and then great stuff like ionization energy and electron affinity tables, standard half-electrode reduction tables... ulp... it's been too many eons since high school; I don't remember anymore what other goodies were there... but they were goodies and taught you a lot of basic chemistry just by looking at it for just fifteen minutes!

 

Alas, I've either heard rumors or have vague, soft recollections that the state has discontinued its distribution.  That would be waaaay too bad.  I have to go ask one of the newest students if this is indeed true!



#45 Luna-tic

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 02:32 AM

I always enjoyed chemistry in HS, but had problems with the math involved.

 

My wife's Masters of Science in Public Health was specialized in radioactive physics. She did a fellowship at Brookhaven National Labs and brought home a Chart of the Nuclides for me to swoon over. It shows all the elements, plus all their isotopes (nuclides) in graph form, with half-lives of each plus the decay progressions of radioactives from one element to the next. I found it much more engrossing than the Periodic Table.

https://en.wikipedia...all_preview.png



#46 star drop

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 09:01 AM

I always enjoyed chemistry in HS, but had problems with the math involved.

 

My wife's Masters of Science in Public Health was specialized in radioactive physics. She did a fellowship at Brookhaven National Labs and brought home a Chart of the Nuclides for me to swoon over. It shows all the elements, plus all their isotopes (nuclides) in graph form, with half-lives of each plus the decay progressions of radioactives from one element to the next. I found it much more engrossing than the Periodic Table.

https://en.wikipedia...all_preview.png

Yes, that is another very interesting table. Some research groups have created exotic nuclei like calcium 56, 58, and 60 to study doubly magic numbers of nucleons. It would be nice to see that information included on the Chart of the Nuclides.



#47 star drop

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 05:44 PM

These two files have the same data but a printed page break problem has been fixed and the colors toned down from the computer version.

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#48 star drop

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 08:37 AM

Latest update.

 

Attached File  LatestElements1.ods   37.6KB   88 downloadsAttached File  LatestElements2.ods   37.31KB   58 downloads


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#49 Astroman007

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 12:07 PM

Fascinating! Thank you for sharing this with us, Ted.

 

Both documents 1 and 2 are saved to my computer for future reference. smile.gif



#50 ColoHank

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 06:16 PM

I never had to memorize the entire table, but I did have to know the symbols for at least 50 of the elements, along with the most common valences for around 20 of them. I also had to memorize the decay sequence for Uranium 238 to Lead 206 (and I still remember the decay particle sequence to this day). Ah, the fond memories of high school Chemistry.... smile.gif

One of my fond memories of high school chemistry involved my taking Jiffy-Pop popcorn to class one day and firing up a Bunsen burner.  It scorched the kernels in the bottom of the aluminum foil pan pretty badly, and the teacher made me share the barely edible remainders with my classmates.  That would have been ca. 1958-59 (I can't remember if it was my junior or senior year).

 

I have less pleasant memories of college chemistry.  Much larger, impersonal classes, and impossibly inept grad assistants messing up unknowns for us to identify in lab.




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