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I love my Orion 90 mm Mak!

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#26 Murat

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 06:34 AM

Hi,
I've just received my Mak 90mm. I setup the scope and will make the polarization. This is my first scope and I need your advice. What should I do next? Should the scope look north always?(The tripod and mount) If you tell me the 1st steps I'll be very glad. Thank you.

#27 Darren B

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 09:11 AM

The right ascension axis always faces north, there are instructions for this mount on Orion's own website at www.telescope.com. Click Accessories, then click Mounts & Tripods and then click EQ-1 Equatorial Mount. The instruction manual is in PDF format. This tells you everything you need to know using an equatorial mount.

Clear Skies

#28 Murat

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 02:13 AM

Thank you Darren.
Unfotunately these days the sky has no planets to view. When it gets dark all the planets that I'll be able to see are out of sight. Even the moon is out of sight. :( What can I see with my sope? Is it possible to see Uranus or any DSOs ?

#29 Ron B[ee]

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 09:07 AM

Thank you Darren.
Unfotunately these days the sky has no planets to view. When it gets dark all the planets that I'll be able to see are out of sight. Even the moon is out of sight. :( What can I see with my sope? Is it possible to see Uranus or any DSOs ?


Mars is getting very good, high, and larger by the day at 5am! The time to start observing the red planet is now.

Ron B[ee]

#30 Murat

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 11:06 AM

Ok Ron. I'll try to find it.

#31 Darren B

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 12:37 AM

There is plenty of dso's you can see at the moment. The ring and dumbell nebula both high in the sky and the andromeda galaxy is rising, I could go on and on. This scope is quite capable with dso's.

#32 Murat

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 03:43 AM

I'm very glad t o hear that. I didn't really know what was the capablity of that scope. There came a 25mm plossl eyepiece with it. I also bough a 2x barlow. What do you recommend me to get as an eyepiece. And what can I see with that 25mm?

#33 Darren B

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 10:19 AM

The 25 mm plossl will be fine for all round use. I have read the Orion 9mm Expanse is good on planets, it will give magnification of around x138 and is very reasonably priced. The eyepieces I have use are Skywatcher 25mm & 10mm SMA, these came with the scope and work ok. I have got a 40mm plossl (unbranded made in Taiwan) well made, but seems to have the same field of view as the 25mm SMA which makes this eyepiece a bit pointless really (I use to have an ST102 and it was not impressive in that). Also I have an Orion 7.5mm Highlight plossl (x166), great on the moon, ok on the planets depending on seeing. I have recently purchased a Celestron 30mm Ultima (x41) for deepsky use, this is a quality eyepiece well built and great views, it costs twice as much as standard plossls, I bought this to do some serious deep sky this winter to see how far I can push this scope. Overall I would recomend well known brands from a reputable dealer with a good return policy. Since you have an Orion telescope their Sirius plossls, Highlight plossels, Expanse and Ultrascopic are reasonbly priced and have received good reviews, they should work well with your telescope.

#34 Murat

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 03:42 PM

Thanks Darren. For the time being I think 25mm plossl will do good.And hte next step will be a 9mm.x138 magnification I think it doubles with a 2xbarlow. You seem to have a good collection of eyepieces.:) And I've lots of thing to learn. I'll try to join A University's astronomy club. They're having sky obsevation parties every month. Practice is better than theory.

#35 Darren B

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 12:24 AM

Joining an astronomy club and going to star parties is the way to go to get the most out of your new hobby. I have learnt alot since starting astronomy and there is plenty more I want to learn about it.
Enjoy and clear skies.

#36 Murat

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 02:52 PM

so sorry I still haven't been able to use my scope. But on sunday night I'll be with experienced observers. Waiting for to join them.
have clear skies.

#37 arctic hawk

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 01:33 PM

I have finally decided to step up & buy my first scope!
A 90mm Mak, not the Orion, but the Celestron C90. I like it's ability to be used as a daytime spotter & that it's waterproof for those uglier days out in the field.

#38 Murat

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 03:47 PM

Welcome arctic hawk. I'm sure you'll have good time with the scope. I'm new here too but those around are very helpful.

#39 arctic hawk

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Posted 04 September 2005 - 10:18 AM

Just need a little cooperation from the weather at nights now...

#40 Murat

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Posted 04 September 2005 - 02:45 PM

Here in Ankara it is very cloudy. Gives no opportunity for observation.

#41 Rammysherriff

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Posted 05 September 2005 - 12:54 PM

I bought one the other week as a do-it-all scope as well. Considering that in its Skywatcher guise with a red dot finder it fits in a little travel bag with room for a few e.p's it is very dinky indeed.

It will do service as a guidescope where its long focal length will be helpful as will its lack of physical size and weight.

It has been used with an erecting prism for birding, and also as a supertelephoto lens for my digital SLR.

A handy accessory is a zoom eyepiece. I have found a cheapish 8-24 one off eBay. Add a x 0.5 focal reducer, and a x 1.6 Magnimax and you will have a range of magnifications that will exceed at either end of the range. Megaportable!!

I too noticed the lack of baffling. I may do something about it, I may not, but to be honest it helped me find Mars the other night. We'll see.

They are worth having - I really rate them!

#42 Darren B

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 12:59 AM

Where did you get your x0.5 focal reducer from and how does it performs with the Mak?

#43 Rammysherriff

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 12:29 AM

Darren,

it's an Atik focal reducer which I bought from Modern Astronomy online. It screws on the end of an eyepiece just like a filter. It works ok with the mak, the only slight problem is that when I put it on my zoom 8-24 eyepiece, and used an erecting prism diagonal, the eyepiece didn't go the last couple of mm into the diagonal because the focal reducer made the barrel of the eyepiece just a little too long. This isn't really a difficulty as there's no glass resting on glass etc, and it's still very snug and secure.

The other thing is that as it turned the eyepiece into a 16 - 48 mm ep, there was a little too much kidney beaning at minimum zoom but as soon as I zoomed in a little it was fine.

NB - did some afocal terrerstrial work last night with a Scopetronix 18mm eyepiece and a Nikon 995. Seemed to work very well, getting focus as good as I could then letting the camera's autofocus finish the job off.

#44 Darren B

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 01:29 AM

Thanks for the reply I'll check it out. I did some observing last night, M13 looked like a nice ball of stars, M57 was easily resolved as was the double cluster, M31 & M32 in the same field. Mars looked good as well, markings were more evident at lower power than high.

I also found out there is enough focus travel so you don't need to use a star diagonal. Had a go at this last night and there was an improvement M13 looked sharper and there was a lot more very faint background stars in the Pleiades, look like It'll be top notch star diagonal on my christmas list.

#45 arctic hawk

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 08:11 AM

Can someone explain eyepieces to me in layman's terms? I am using the stock 32mm Plossl that came with my 90mm Mak. For future reference, is there another one/few I should look at?
So far astronomically, I am very very happy with my C90. I have not taken it out as a spotter in foul weather but fall & winter approaches...

#46 Rammysherriff

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 11:26 AM

Sure thing. First of all a little link:

Scopesim

Have a play with that as it will show you graphically what variables are involved in a telescope's optics.

Basically the lower the focal length of the eyepiece (smaller numbers) the higher the magnification and the narrower the field. (Also the dimmer the image and the harder to focus)

Quick handy tip: divide the focal length of your scope by the focal length of the eyepiece to get magnification. With a 90mm scope, x 200 is about the best magnification you can get away with. Your Plossl should give x 39 mag, a 6mm eyepiece will give x 208 mag.

I hope that helps; the only other factors are eyepieces' own apparent fields of view, and whether to use 2" eyepieces. In your case 2" is not an option, and the apparent field of view of an eyepiece is easily found and factored into what you are actually going to see.

Hope this helps!

NB - if your scope will get use as a spotter I would commend a decent zoom eyepiece which is much more convenient than swapping a pocket full of fixed length eyepieces. My 8-24 zoom gives x52 to x156. That's a lot higher than most birding scopes but the optics can take it. The x 0.5 reducer gives x26 to x78 which is a bit more in the normal realms of a birding scope. Bear in mind the optics IMHO are semi-apochromatic, and as has been pointed out the focus range is quite huge, I think it is a blooming good buy!!!

#47 Darren B

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 06:10 AM

Hello Rammysherriff

Just bought an Atik focal reducer and what a good buy. If you have an 1.25 extension tube or a shorty barlow lens where you can unscrew the lens you may want to try this.
Place the extension tube in the back of the telescope, then screw the focal reducer in front of the star diagonal and place eyepiece in usual place. You will find it works as a x0.25 reducer. My 15mm plossel x83 is now x20/21 with a 2 degree FOV which make this little mak very user friendly. Last night I observed the moon and could easily fit 4 moon widths with this set up.

#48 Rammysherriff

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 08:01 AM

Clever idea Darren. Glad you found one, and if you did source it from Modern Astronomy, keep in touch with him he's a very helpful and knowledgable man is Bernard.

I wish they made a 2" one....


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