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Scanning in your old astrophotos

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#26 nomosnow

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 09:18 PM

M 106 yes that does ring a bell now thanks. Here is a colour shot of M-3 . It was taken on Fujicolour 400 a 45 min exposure the film was hypersensitized in forming gas.
I have a question for you old film veterans what do you think comes closer to the look of the old film shots ccd or video with a Mallincam or DSLR ?
The reason I am asking as I would like to do some deepsky photography in the future and I am not sure which way to go.
One thing for sure is that my telescope time is valuable as astronomy conditions in Alberta are not the best so I am leaning toward the Mallincam for it's more immediate results.

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#27 Nebhunter

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 12:57 PM

That's a tough call. Personally, I would do the Mallin Cam. I've been watching on some of the feeds, and being able to do incredible visual in a LP city is huge. Not sure of the imaging part. Sit inside during the cold winter nights. Oh yeah.

#28 Ivory Kid

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Posted 27 July 2011 - 07:53 PM

Agree--thanks for sharing these. They all remind me of the images that sparked my interest in astronomy.

#29 nomosnow

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 06:25 PM

Here is NGC 6960 and 52 Cygni. Note how many more stars are seen on one side as compared to the other side of the Nebula as per page 805 of Burnham's " the Veil is expanding and sweeping up interstellar material as it does so"
Exposure was 45 mins on tp 2415 film that was hypered taken in 1987.

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#30 nomosnow

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 07:43 PM

In an effort to keep this thread on the front page .Here is another one..... :grin:

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#31 nomosnow

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Posted 16 August 2011 - 11:36 PM

Here is a very high contrast picture of the Pleiades.

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#32 Michal1

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 01:35 PM

Nomosnow, keep posting, these photos are perfect. They remind me why I've selected film for my astrophotography effort. They have a special appearance that is hard or impossible to imitate with a digital sensor.
The Pleiades photo is the best. It's like to be inside the cluster!

#33 Giorgos

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 01:05 AM

Saturn through my 6"f/8 newtonian. Eyepiece projection at approx. f/100. Kodak 400 film, exposure not recorded. I cant recall how long the film had remained undeveloped in the Practika VLC3 (years!)

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#34 highfnum

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 10:32 AM

this(planetary) used to be the hardest type of astrphotography
havent seen one of these in a long time

#35 nomosnow

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 11:43 PM

Here is the Veil Nebula (NGC 6992) taken with a 12.5 inch f 6 scope and a $ 50.00 used Olympus Om-1 those were the days !!
Now 35 mm format is so big!

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#36 nomosnow

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 11:57 PM

Here is M 101 about 28 years prior to the discovery of the Aug 23/2011 supernova.

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#37 nomosnow

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 08:50 PM

Here is M 101 with TP 2415 .

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#38 Rick Thurmond

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 09:44 PM

Excellent!

#39 nomosnow

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 07:16 PM

I really like barred spiral galaxies . Here is NGC 7479 as captured on tp 2415 at 75 inches focal length and about 45 minutes exposure time.

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#40 MadCrawdad

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 09:02 PM

Nice pictures. I'm curious as to how you went about scanning them. I've got some old shots, mainly star fields and Hale-Bopp, all on slides. Whenever I've tried to scan, I've ended up with nothing but plain black shots.

Thanks.

#41 Dave Kodama

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 03:09 AM

What scanner are you using? One problem could be that you need to turn off auto-exposure. If possible, have the scanner output 48-bit TIFF files (i.e. raw scan from the scanner). Many scanners will default to 24-bit JPEG which will severely limit your options for post-processing.

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#42 MadCrawdad

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 09:57 AM

Nothing fancy. At first (many years back) I had an HP PhotoSmart scanner specifically for scanning slides/negatives and photos. Then a few years later with an HP flat bed scanner and slide/negative scanner attachment. Most recently with a little hand-held usb slide/negative scanner.

The last scanner seems to be the worst..it scans everything really dark. Maybe it's just a matter of playing with the settings some more.

#43 Dave Kodama

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 10:14 AM

Fiddling with the controls more may be the answer. You are basically trying to scan what is normally considered to be a very under exposed image and that requires extreme adjustments.

If your software doesn't seem to allow enough control, you might look at the vuescan program:

http://www.hamrick.com/

You can try it out free, and the price is pretty reasonable.

It supports many abandoned scanners and gives you far more control than the original manufacturer's software in many cases. I've been using it very well with my old Nikon LS-1000 35mm scanner, which Nikon abandoned so long ago, the last drivers for it were for Windows 98!

The only downside of the software is that it's quite complex, so it will take some time to get the most out of the software... which reminds me... what software are you using to post process the scan? Most astrophotos also take a fair amount of post processing to be able to see the full range of the scan.

Dave

#44 Dave Kodama

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 10:22 AM

P.S. Another way to get a rough scan more easily is to put the slide on a light table, raised away from the surface, if possible. Then try to take a photo of it with a digital camera. If your camera has a macro setting, you might be able to fill the full frame. If not, you'll at least be able to easily play with exposures of different lengths to see what kind of results should be possible with a real film scanner.

Dave

#45 MadCrawdad

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 01:21 PM

As far as the software, I've only used whatever basic programs came with the scanners. I'm not particularly adept at digital processing, but will give the program you mentioned a try. Thanks.

#46 telletdl

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 04:00 PM

I'll second the Vuescan recommendation. I haven't explored it thoroughly, but it is far better with my Epson V600 than the ebson supplied software. Much better interface as well.

David

#47 nomosnow

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 12:13 AM

Here is M-11 .On Tech Pan Film and taken wih a 12.5 inch F-6 Newtonian scope.

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#48 nomosnow

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 07:12 PM

Here are NGC 884,869 . The double cluster!! Total time on this exposure was 45 mins . Photo was processed at a one hour shop, no darks,no stacking , no flats .
Those were the good old days.

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#49 nomosnow

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 08:04 PM

Here is M-37 . Photo was taken on Jan 22, 1987 . A 15 minute exposure with my 12.5 inch F-6 Newtonian on Konica SR 1600 film.Film was hypered for 15 hours in forming gas. Processed in a 1 hour neighborhood processing shop.

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#50 nomosnow

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 12:38 AM

Here is NGC 891 taken on Nov 16, 1986 with TP 2415 exposure time of 45 minutes , film was hyper sensitized for 48 hours in forming gas

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