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Obie 20x80 Deluxe II

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:52 PM

I just received these the other day in exchange for some Obie 20x80 Standards and had them out Sunday night from about 1:30 to 2:30 am CST.

I'm very pleased with them so far. My viewing session was more about playing with the focus, ipd, eye relief and finding center balance on my 501 head than locating objects. These are heavy binos, but they are very short, which makes it easy to adjust them on my 501. I can use the narrowest IPD setting w/o the objective tubes hitting the head. I can also slide my adapter plate back and forth with no obstructions. The 25x100 IF had problems in both of these areas, which is why you will need the 1.25" riser that Oberwerk offers if you buy that bino. The center bar knob tightens down very easily, and there is no side-to-side movement. This was another issue with the 25x100 IFs I had at Christmas last year. I understand this issue has been resolved with a new knob design.

The Milky Way was awesome as usual. Being lazy and having some recent neck problems, I chose Sagittarius and Scorpius since they were pretty low in the sky by that time of night. I viewed several Messiers in the teacup part of Sagittarius and also Scorpius, which brings me to my question about a comet. I saw an object in between Sagittarius and Scorpius that appeared as a faint, round smudge much like Comet Macholz appeared to me. It seemed to be changing in intensity. It is probably just a Messier object that I have not been able to identify, but I thought I would ask anyway.

I experienced two factors Sunday night that made it difficult to do any serious observing, which is unfortunate since the skies were good and dark. The first factor was the heat. Even at 2:00 am CST, it was still in the upper 80s. We had temperatures in the 100s on Sunday. It reached 109 where I live! Sagittarius and Scorpius are pretty low in the sky in the early morning hours, so maybe that contributed to the poor viewing. Secondly, it was extremely windy. I though it was odd at the time to have that much wind at 2:00 am w/o a front to cause it, but upon further reflection, the intense heat we had that day probably had a lot to do with it.

The problem was not keeping my binocs steady. My tripod and head are more than capable. It was like I could see the effects of the wind during focusing and viewing. I could get the binos to focus to a pinpoint, but the image would seem to go in and out of focus periodically. Does that make sense? Maybe I was just tired. I plan to do another session when the heat and wind let up, which in Texas will be around November ;)

#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:53 PM

It seems you are really enjoying your new bins. I have the same type from Oberwerks. I love them. They're an excellent blend of light grab and portability for the price. Unfortunately I have not been able to get out with them much the past 4 weeks due to weather and travel, but I hope to get a look at Sco and Sag soon.

#3 EdZ

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 03:08 PM

Hi Shawn,

I suspect the heat was ruining your seeing.

The center bar knob tightens down very easily, and there is no side-to-side movement. This was another issue with the 25x100 IFs I had at Christmas last year. I understand this issue has been resolved with a new knob design.


My 25x100 IF also rocked back and forth a lot on the center post. But it had nothing to do with the knob. I simply loosened the hand tightened cover cap where the center post attaches to the eyepiece bridge and tightened the three screws that hold the center post fixed to the shaft. I now have very little rocking back and forth.

I can use the narrowest IPD setting w/o the objective tubes hitting the head. I can also slide my adapter plate back and forth with no obstructions. The 25x100 IF had problems in both of these areas, which is why you will need the 1.25" riser that Oberwerk offers if you buy that bino.



I agree. this is an oversight in the 25x100 IF design. the center post mount piece is not tall enough. I could not mount at the proper balance point and then get the barrels close enough to my IPD. I needed to add a 1" tall bottom adapter to the vertical post. that raises it up high enough so the barrels don't hit the top of the 501 head.
This photo shows the extra 1" post adapter.

edz

#4 btschumy

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 05:10 PM

I saw an object in between Sagittarius and Scorpius that appeared as a faint, round smudge much like Comet Macholz appeared to me. It seemed to be changing in intensity. It is probably just a Messier object that I have not been able to identify, but I thought I would ask anyway.


If it looked a bit like a comet then it was probably a globular. The only two I can find that would be considered "between" Sagittarius and Scorpius are NGC 6541 and maybe M 62. 6542 would culminate at only 13 degrees from Dallas, so it would have been pretty low. M 62 is much higher and closer to Scorpius. You might look at a chart and see which (if either) it may have been.

#5 DJB

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 12:53 AM

Hi Sleepy,

I will try to quickly address the focus apparently going and coming. Certainly, the wind could have had an effect.

But I wonder, with thoses kinds of daytime temps, if, perhaps, you were observing the effects of radiational cooling at night. Also observing at lower altitudes will surely accentuate this phenomonon. November is better for you, while, here, we might have several inches of snow on the ground already and the dreaded NW winds in upstate NY.

Regards,

Dave.

#6 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 07:20 AM

November in New England has historically been the cloudiest month of the year. If it's not the wind messing things up, it's the clouds.

The wind will definitely have an impact especially when looking at near horizon objects. I believe there is document within CN that explains and pictorially shows how all these factors work together to affect seeing conditions. It's probably in the telescope arena...I can't remember.

#7 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 10:25 AM

I'm sure the radiational cooling was one of the main culprits. I had never observed at 2:00 am with the temp still in the upper eighties and the wind blowing as strong. A thanks for everyone's input. I just wanted to confirm my suspicions.


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