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Observing with 20x80 Deluxe II

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 01:05 AM

I just finished testing my new binos under much better conditions than the last time I posted. We had a system come through this morning with unexpected rain, which cleaned the air and brought much cooler temps. Tonight was clear with no wind in the low 70s. I was able to view several Messiers in Scorp and Sag and two doubles in Lyra. I'm using Terence Dickinson's Nightwatch charts 8 and 10.

The "smudge" that I could not identify the other night because of the turbulent air was M22. M7, M6 and the Scorpius Jewel Box were very nice. I could see the 6th mag globular cluster M4 but not as easily as M22. The Lagoon Nebula was beautiful.

I was able to easily resolve the tight binocular double in Lyra. For some reason I could not locate the double in Alberio. I'm still learning my way around the skies. The milky way is so rich right now that some of the clusters are getting lost.

I really like these binos. The focus knob is very tight and the twist-up eye cups work very well; almost like using my birding binoculars. I am able to concentrate on observing and not dinking with settings. I have not noticed any CA or flaring of brighter objects. I will measure their edge sharpness another night. The mesquitos ran me off after about 90 minutes.

#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 07:24 AM

You didn't see the beautiful Alberio double? I highly suggest trying again. As I am sure you can look up in an atlas, it is at the tip of Cygnus. There are few other colorful doubles to look at as well.

Do you like the twist cups? I am totally indifferent, but I find myself with the cups pressed against the bins most often.

#3 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 07:53 AM

I found it last year around August in the NW sky at about 10:00 (location not the time). I owned the Oberwerk 20x90 at the time and was able to see the gold and blue pair easily. I was at a star party, so I had help in locating it. Last night it was 11:30 pm CST before I went outside, so I think it was too far overhead for me to find it w/o strainin my neck too much. The fact is I'm having trouble identifying the Northern Cross, which would point me to Alberio. Any suggestions?

Yes, I much prefer twist-up over standard rubber eyecups. All my binos have them except the 15x70 Obies.

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 12:53 PM

Suggestions? Gee, I don't know. I can always find Cygnus right away, but then again I have seen it so many times. It is the star(s) which make the "head or bill" of the swan or if you consider it a cross, it's the star(s) at the base. Either way it is the star at the end or tip. If you can find Lyra you should see Cygnus!

#5 KennyJ

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 05:18 PM

Shawn,

If no -one else turns out to be bothered to take the time to help you find the Northern Cross , I will.

I'm surprised , for example , that members such as the one who calls himself Bebs or Mike G , given his exhaustive epistles on such detailed images to be beheld in the Cygnus region , appears either unwilling or unable to find the time or inclination to point you in the right direction.

Of course , Mike is not the only one who I feel falls into this category.

That said , it is well documented that I know next to nothing about astronomy , but in season , even I can find the NORTHERN CROSS with naked eye after an exceedingly intoxicating social session.

Kind regards , Kenny

#6 btschumy

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 05:33 PM

Kenny,

It's not that we can't be bothered, but it is one of the more easily recognized constellations in the sky. With a modicum of effort it can be easily found.

That said, go out sometime in the next few weeks about an hour after dark. Look ENE at about 30 degrees. Cygnus is the large cross whose long axis runs parallel to the Milky Way. Albireo is the star at the foot of the cross in the southern part of the constellation.

#7 KennyJ

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 05:52 PM

Bill,

You opened your last post with :

< It's not that we can't be bothered > ------

----------------------------------------------? ! ? :-)

Judging by a combination of what I perceive as YOUR tone and MY translation of your comment , you must have spent many hours PM -ing many other members prior to making your statement ?

You used the collective term " WE" ! ?

BTW -- the constellation might be something approximating ENE at about 30 degrees from Texas , but is certainly not so from Lancashire UK :-)

Regards , Kenny

#8 BillC

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 06:23 PM

Lancashire . . . Lancashire . . . Lancashire . . . Oh, yes, Now I remember. That's in EAST Texas, isn't it. Or is it down by Dripping Springs!?

Cheers,

Bill

#9 Rich N

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 07:09 PM

I found it last year around August in the NW sky at about 10:00 (location not the time). I owned the Oberwerk 20x90 at the time and was able to see the gold and blue pair easily. I was at a star party, so I had help in locating it. Last night it was 11:30 pm CST before I went outside, so I think it was too far overhead for me to find it w/o strainin my neck too much. The fact is I'm having trouble identifying the Northern Cross, which would point me to Alberio. Any suggestions?

Yes, I much prefer twist-up over standard rubber eyecups. All my binos have them except the 15x70 Obies.


The Northern Cross (Cygnus) runs almost down the middle of the Milky Way. It's a big constellation.

Deneb, the top of Northern Cross (Cygnus) is northeast of Vega. The three stars of the arm of the cross run across the Milky a little south of Deneb. The bottom of the cross is Albireo. It's roughly southeast of Vega.

If you look at it as the Swan, Albireo is the head of the swan with its long neck sticking well south of its wings. Deneb is the tail of Cygnus.

Good luck,
Rich

#10 milt

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 07:48 PM

Hi Shawn,

I believe everyone here is assuming that you are using a star chart. Are you? A great buy for binocular users is the laminated Sky & Telescope Messier Card:

http://skyandtelesco...S001L&search=NO

It clearly shows the outlines of all the constellations in relation to each other and is easily read with a redbeam flashlight. In fact, if you click on the image in the above link, you will see Cygnus in the upper left corner!

#11 Alby

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 07:59 PM

Hi all;

Bebs is putting a list together of binoc objects....I'm thinking of compiling a list of another sort.

Best or worst put-downs/retorts/sarcasm/one liners/two liners:)/obtuse refuse/funny stuff.........

Examples

Judging by a combination of what I perceive as YOUR tone and MY translation of your comment , you must have spent many hours PM -ing many other members prior to making your statement ?

Lancashire . . . Lancashire . . . Lancashire . . . Oh, yes, Now I remember. That's in EAST Texas, isn't it. Or is it down by Dripping Springs!?

Bull . . .
Especially, since you just won "bino jerk of the month" and get the free Helmsman.

What year did you graduate from the Bernard Getz school of diplomacy?

Don"t you think Kenny has one of those faces that you could gladly kick?

The above line is taken from the off topic forum that I find to be in poor taste!!Below is a response to the above.

If such a meeting comes about , I will gladly offer forth my face for the aforementioned "slap" , but with the warning that it has always been my philosophy that if anyone hits me , I will try to hit them back twice as hard :-)

More from the bono forum........

“Mirrored Optics Provide Faster Light Transition”

BILL -- ( Left jab to your forehead ) -- you ( another left jab to your nose )-- are ( duck and right upper cut to your chin ) at it AGAIN ! ( referee steps in and stops the bout )

Lastly for now, here's one from yours truely which still applies:)

That's my .02$ on this cloudy night with nothing better to do but have some drinks and not make any sense:)

Cheers

Alby

#12 EdZ

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 08:11 PM



that's OT



edz

#13 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 10:15 PM

I guess that you can tell Sleepy that Cygnus...or the Northern Cross will bop you on the head. Once you spot it, you'll never forget it. It's very pronounced!



#14 btschumy

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 10:36 PM

Judging by a combination of what I perceive as YOUR tone and MY translation of your comment , you must have spent many hours PM -ing many other members prior to making your statement ?

You used the collective term " WE" ! ?

No, in this case it was the "Royal We" ;)

BTW -- the constellation might be something approximating ENE at about 30 degrees from Texas , but is certainly not so from Lancashire UK :-)


Yes, but Sleepy is in DFW which I immediately take to be "Dallas - Ft. Worth". This is only 200 miles north of here so it is ENE! But you are right that I should have spelled out that assumption.

#15 SaberScorpX

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 12:00 AM

re: The fact is I'm having trouble identifying the Northern Cross, which would point me to Alberio. Any suggestions?

Hi Sleepy-
Found a coupla simple charts that might help.
Albireo lies 22° SW of Deneb within the Summer Triangle (formed by the stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair), and marks the base of the Northern Cross.
The linked charts show the areas oriented as they would appear overhead (facing south). Note that the parallelogram of suns that make up Lyra's Harp also roughly point to Albireo (only ~8° SE of gammaLyr).
Start by matching the marked asterisms to your visible stars. Then try spotting 3rd mag Albireo naked-eye and starhopping with your 15's wider field before swinging the big binos toward him.

And apologies to Kenny for my tardiness. ;)

Saber

Ready to tackle the Herschel 400?
http://www.geocities...rpx/SGH400.html

#16 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 12:11 AM

You guys are a real barrel of laughs. Maybe I should cancel my satellite service and just read replies all night. Then I could buy more astronomy equipment with the savings. Thanks for the link to the messier card, Milt. I’ll probably get it. For the price, it is worth a try. I’m not too fond of the charts in Nightwatch. They are very informative but not practical for use in the field. You have to flip from chart to chart too much, and the book is too bulky.

Anyway, you all will be pleased to know I just finished observing tonight and was easily able to locate the Northern Cross and Alberio. My wife and daughters even got in on the action. We could clearly see the blue and gold in each star and they were very sharp. Then I showed them the Lagoon Nebula, M6, M7, M4 and several other objects in Sag and Scorp. I was able to keep their attention long enough to show them Saturn and four of its moons. I can’t resolve the rings at 20x, but I can make out a disc shape and a hint of separation. The 25x100 IFs I had last year could just resolve the rings. I need to buy another pair.

That’s all for tonight.

Grace and peace,

#17 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 12:21 AM

Saber,

These are good links. I was turned around last night looking for a smaller cross in an upright position instead of laying on its side with Deneb at the bottom left in the NE sky.

#18 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 12:32 AM

Rich,

In what part of the country do you live? What I see is exactly the opposite of the way you describe it. When I look at the Northern Cross in the NE sky at 12:30 am CST, Deneb is south/southwest of Vega and the cross is almost at a 45 degree angle with Deneb in the lower left and Alberio in the upper right.

#19 SaberScorpX

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 12:39 AM

re: I was able to keep their attention long enough to show them Saturn and four of its moons. I can’t resolve the rings at 20x, but I can make out a disc shape and a hint of separation. The 25x100 IFs I had last year could just resolve the rings. I need to buy another pair.

I believe your 20s were doing a fine job, as the scrutinized planet was most likely Jupiter.

And congrats on bagging Albireo and a worthy observing session with the family. :waytogo:

Saber

Ready to tackle the Herschel 400?
http://www.geocities...rpx/SGH400.html

#20 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 12:40 AM

You guys are a rough group. I always thought astronomers were just geeks. Now I know they are testy geeks ;)

#21 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 12:56 AM

Hey Kenny,

I was looking for the help you offered in this post, and much like the trouble I had last night with the Northern Cross, I can't seem to find it. Fortunately for you, I watched Benny Hill and Monty Python when I was a kid, so I understand British humour. I think your helpful advice is that I get looped prior to stargazing.

Cheerio my dear chap ; )

#22 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 01:00 AM

Don't I feel silly. I don't know why I thought I was looking at Saturn. So I guess its a good thing I did not report that I was able to resolve its rings.

#23 SaberScorpX

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 02:56 AM

Hardly the worst celestial faux pas.
If it makes you feel better there's a post at Stellar Reactions about an instructor showing Venus to a group of Scouts. His 'Venus' turned-out to be a distant streetlight!

Saber

Ready to tackle the Herschel 400?
http://www.geocities...rpx/SGH400.html

#24 Rich N

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 03:58 AM

Rich,

In what part of the country do you live? What I see is exactly the opposite of the way you describe it. When I look at the Northern Cross in the NE sky at 12:30 am CST, Deneb is south/southwest of Vega and the cross is almost at a 45 degree angle with Deneb in the lower left and Alberio in the upper right.


Hi Shawn,

I'm in California.

Try finding the North Star (Polaris). Deneb should always be closer to North Celestial Pole (near the Polaris) than Vega.

Cygnus comes up in the East on its side and sinks into the western horizon on its head (or the bottom of the cross).

The Night Sky planisphere is the best I've seen. They cost sbout $10. With it you can see how the stars rotate around the North Celestial Pole.

Clear skies,
Rich

#25 Rich N

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 07:10 AM

Hi Shawn,

You might want to use a compass and check your directions. Don't forget to allow for the offset for true north from magnetic north, whatever the offset number is for your area.

Good luck,
Rich


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