Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

getting unstressed astronomically

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
26 replies to this topic

#1 droid

droid

    rocketman

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 8,832
  • Joined: 29 Aug 2004

Posted 09 July 2005 - 05:53 AM

Hello all; just a short report here, after working 10 hours plus all week on second shift, I got in last night about 11:30 , looked up to see what has got to be the best sky of the year, the milky way was visible ,while a street light was in my eyes, unheard in these parts.
Naturally I figured, Im wooped and in no mood for standing around waiting for the scopes to cool down.
So I grabbed my venerable old 10x50 stellar binos, drove to the local park.
Layed on the roof of the car , and just scanned the milky end to end.
Starting in cygnus, I scanned my way to Sagitarius.
No effort was was made to remember Mnumbers, nor was I useing any charts, I was just gawking at the beauty of the night sky, the way I used to as a teenager.
After 2 hours or so I felt like I had sand in my eyes, and since it was a short drive home I decided to pack it in.
I was standing there takeing a last longing look at the sky when it dawned on me, that my stress was gone and I felt like a new man.
This is something I will have to do more often.
Ok well, clear skys to you all. Andy

#2 edwincjones

edwincjones

    Close Enough

  • *****
  • Posts: 13,486
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2004

Posted 09 July 2005 - 06:36 AM

Andy,

You have said it all!

Ed Jones

#3 Glassthrower

Glassthrower

    Vendor - Galactic Stone & Ironworks

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 18,505
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 08:12 AM

the milky way was visible ,while a street light was in my eyes, unheard in these parts.


I envy you sir. I have never seen the MW with the naked eye. And I agree, stargazing is a great way to unwind.

MikeG

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----

Posted 09 July 2005 - 08:31 AM

Looking at a clear night's sky does help put things in "perspective".

#5 mooreorless

mooreorless

    Just worried

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,444
  • Joined: 05 Jul 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 08:40 AM

Hello All,I finally "signed" on the other day after lurking on CN for some time.I feel for people that have never seen the Milky Way with the naked eye.I am fortunate to live where just walking the dog in very early morning I can see the Milky Way with no problem.I agree stargazing is a great way to relieve stress.
Steve M

#6 Glassthrower

Glassthrower

    Vendor - Galactic Stone & Ironworks

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 18,505
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 09:03 AM

Hello All,I finally "signed" on the other day after lurking on CN for some time.I feel for people that have never seen the Milky Way with the naked eye.I am fortunate to live where just walking the dog in very early morning I can see the Milky Way with no problem.I agree stargazing is a great way to relieve stress.
Steve M


Welcome to CN Steve. It's hard to remain a lurker around here for long, the atmosphere is contagious.

MIkeG

#7 Steve Napier

Steve Napier

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,559
  • Joined: 10 May 2004

Posted 09 July 2005 - 09:05 AM

Ive never seen the Milky Way in 30 years of Astronomy!
Steve.

#8 mooreorless

mooreorless

    Just worried

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,444
  • Joined: 05 Jul 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 09:21 AM

Mike,I agree and Thanks.
Steve M

#9 droid

droid

    rocketman

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 8,832
  • Joined: 29 Aug 2004

Posted 09 July 2005 - 09:29 AM

wow, I didnt realize how many people dont know what the milky way looks like.My milky way is a vague imatation of the real thing, barely visible if at all.
I did see it once three years ago from cherry springs state park in Pa. , I swore there were clouds rolling in, it was that substantial, I long to see it that way again.

#10 mooreorless

mooreorless

    Just worried

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,444
  • Joined: 05 Jul 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 09:30 AM

Steve N,I guess not being able to see the Milky Way is more prevalent than I thought.I guess I don't realize how good I have it. :jump:
Steve M

#11 lighttrap

lighttrap

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,833
  • Joined: 06 Feb 2004

Posted 09 July 2005 - 09:49 AM

I fear that we're coming into a time when whole generations will have never seen the Milky Way in all it's glorious splendor.

Andy, I got into astronomy in middle age, precisely because I was going through a very stressful time in my life, and laying out in the yard on a chaise lounge with a binocular was about the only really relaxing way to beat insomnia, and free my mind of various stresses. That was several years ago, and I've been hooked ever since. Even today, I still find the simple pleasures of handheld bino astronomy to be more relaxing than messing around with any of several scopes. And sometimes just something as simple as not even having to worry about which eyepiece to use, has it's great appeal to me.

Cheers,
Mike

#12 Mr. Bill

Mr. Bill

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,793
  • Joined: 09 Feb 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 10:23 AM

Hello all; just a short report here, after working 10 hours plus all week on second shift, I got in last night about 11:30 , looked up to see what has got to be the best sky of the year, the milky way was visible ,while a street light was in my eyes, unheard in these parts.
Naturally I figured, Im wooped and in no mood for standing around waiting for the scopes to cool down.
So I grabbed my venerable old 10x50 stellar binos, drove to the local park.
Layed on the roof of the car , and just scanned the milky end to end.
Starting in cygnus, I scanned my way to Sagitarius.
No effort was was made to remember Mnumbers, nor was I useing any charts, I was just gawking at the beauty of the night sky, the way I used to as a teenager.
After 2 hours or so I felt like I had sand in my eyes, and since it was a short drive home I decided to pack it in.
I was standing there takeing a last longing look at the sky when it dawned on me, that my stress was gone and I felt like a new man.
This is something I will have to do more often.
Ok well, clear skys to you all. Andy


I think what you experienced is called an epiphany. Welcome to the club. Without getting too "new age", this kind of observing allows you to get in touch with some pretty deep stuff that many people never experience. It is the opposite of task oriented behavior; instead of doing, you are being.

The loss of the night skies and the wonder that they can evoke is tragic and has consequences beyond our understanding.

#13 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----

Posted 09 July 2005 - 01:07 PM

No wonder "heaven" is above. Watching the skies has always been a form of getting in touch with the transcendental aspects of existence.
Thanks for your report, droid!

peace,

#14 Mr. Bill

Mr. Bill

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,793
  • Joined: 09 Feb 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 01:54 PM

I fear that we're coming into a time when whole generations will have never seen the Milky Way in all it's glorious splendor.

Andy, I got into astronomy in middle age, precisely because I was going through a very stressful time in my life, and laying out in the yard on a chaise lounge with a binocular was about the only really relaxing way to beat insomnia, and free my mind of various stresses. That was several years ago, and I've been hooked ever since. Even today, I still find the simple pleasures of handheld bino astronomy to be more relaxing than messing around with any of several scopes. And sometimes just something as simple as not even having to worry about which eyepiece to use, has it's great appeal to me.

Cheers,
Mike


After a couple of nights observing, I'll take a break by just sitting on the back deck with a good bottle of wine and watch the skies rotate. Very therapeutic.

#15 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*
  • -----

Posted 09 July 2005 - 03:59 PM

After a couple of nights observing, I'll take a break by just sitting on the back deck with a good bottle of wine and watch the skies rotate. Very therapeutic.

Indeed!

#16 davidpitre

davidpitre

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,572
  • Joined: 10 May 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 04:41 PM

I have a physically and mentally high stress business, and just got into astronomy a year ago. It does wonders for me to go outside and scan the skies. It is the only thing I have found that so completely calms my mind and relaxes me
(and this from someone who spent several years in a Zen monestary).
I never would have guessed it, and those who haven't experienced it hardly understand.

#17 nodaknewbie

nodaknewbie

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 197
  • Joined: 31 Mar 2005

Posted 09 July 2005 - 05:32 PM

"Ain't it great!"
I know what you mean about just looking at the stars. The other night after about 2 months of rain and clouds we got a clear night. I took the binoculars out and just looked. At the big dipper, Cygnus, Jupiter, and about 3000 other stars. It was FUN. Nothing in particular, just the heavens.
Great hobby.
Enjoy
Gary

#18 Joad

Joad

    Wordsmith

  • *****
  • Posts: 18,500
  • Joined: 22 Mar 2005

Posted 10 July 2005 - 10:18 PM

How can I add anything to this? You are all saying it all. Before I started getting serious about my sky viewing, I really couldn't keep awake much past 10:00 at night. Now I can stay out until one or two a.m. being soothed by the infinite (OK, not technically infinite: the universe is relativistically curved) heavens. Time flies and all other thoughts vanish as one gazes, searches, and gazes again. And whenever possible, get thee to a spot where the Milky Way shines.

#19 ClownFish

ClownFish

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,667
  • Joined: 26 Apr 2005

Posted 11 July 2005 - 10:50 AM

I've never seen the Milky Way in 30 years of Astronomy!


That's just sad. You folks that have never seen your own galaxy should stop over at my house. The Milky Way runs from horizon to horizon and within 30 minutes from my home it even casts a shadow!

CF

#20 Mike B

Mike B

    Starstruck

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,020
  • Joined: 06 Apr 2005

Posted 11 July 2005 - 11:34 AM

The gradual loss of our dark skies is certainly a grievous development, yet some of the "haven't seen the MW" is folks simply not recognizing that it's there. Living in a rural town where the MW is at least visible in most residentail areas, i was recently doing a star/comet party in mag ~6 skies just outside town- and some of the locals thot the MW they were seeing was a band of clouds/fog! The difference between seeing & perceiving- but their joy of discovery was still really cool to enjoy with them.

The relaxation/unwinding thing is so very true- you can feel life's tension draining right out! Y'all have inspired me to spend more lounge & bino time under the stars :ubetcha:
:cool: mike b

#21 Magellanico

Magellanico

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 379
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2005

Posted 11 July 2005 - 11:47 AM

It sounds really sad. There are many people that have never seen the Milky Way and there are a lot more that have never seen the Magellanics. Where I stargazer, the Milky Way is so strong that I don't need a flashlight to see the maps. There's no words to describe, except: The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament His handwork.

#22 laura1981

laura1981

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 25 May 2005

Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:05 PM

I agree, the Ohio skies were absolutely perfect that night! Got off work at midnight, and probably spent close to an hour just on the Sagittarius region. I was able to locate M51 in the binocs for the first time, too. It's usually not clear or dark enough for that one. Now all the hurricane clouds are here. Too bad!

#23 Glassthrower

Glassthrower

    Vendor - Galactic Stone & Ironworks

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 18,505
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005

Posted 11 July 2005 - 12:51 PM

Electricity has been the great boon/bane for mankind. On the one hand it improves the quality of life and the other hand it makes dependent all of those who don't know that life goes on without it. Some people cannot imagine living in a world without artificial lights, electricity and the internet...personally, I dream about such a world. As nice as television, movies, radio, CD's, and Cloudy Nights are, a world without all of this electro-pollution would be a paradise to me. Not to mention Mag 8 skies for everyone the world over!

:silly:

MikeG

#24 droid

droid

    rocketman

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 8,832
  • Joined: 29 Aug 2004

Posted 12 July 2005 - 09:22 AM

I have really got a lot of enjoyment out of this thread.
As for the lighting troubles, I think a lot of that is all in peoples heads, like the folks who put up not one but three motion detector lights, all three have two bulbs capable of lighting a small ball field, when I pleaded with them to turn them off at night , when Im in my back yard, they flatly refused saying they needed the security.
How exactly do I argue with that??

#25 KennyJ

KennyJ

    The British Flash

  • *****
  • Posts: 37,793
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2003

Posted 12 July 2005 - 10:31 AM

As far as " stress relief " goes , I find lying flat on my back , or in a very reclined position , hand -holding LOW -POWER binoculars much more stress - FREE than having to set -up , carry -out and constantly adjust any mounted binocular or telescope with higher magnification and a narrow field of view.

Since the departure of Steve Napier from our ranks , I believe that apart from Arthur Pinewood , I might just be the only surviving CN bino forum regular who actually PREFERS using " a 7x glass " above the higher -power models.

Regards , Kenny


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics