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Just a White Disc!

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 01:17 AM


Hi Guys and Gals,
I was trying to get some nice views of jupiter the other night, however i am still just seeing a white disc shape, and its moons.

I have a Celestron 114GT (4.5" Newt), (and collimated it that evening, before going outside, and double checking after it cooled). as well as the eyepiece kit with the Six Coloured Eyepiece Filters Yellow#12, Orange#21, Red#25, Light Green#56, Green#58A, and Blue#80A, what do you suggest i use to be able to atleast see the belts of Jupiter? i tried the Red#25 with the 15mm-Barlowed, and from what i could tell i was getting a red disk, i didnt fool around with it too much longer, i had to come in, it was -30 celcius, and my scope was outside prior to using it for a good hour. I have Heavy Light pollution i can see about up to Mag +2 only. Any ideas on what i can do to be able to atleast see a cloud belt?
Thanks Guys.

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#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 11:08 AM

Matthew, I don't really know how to fix your problem. I can
only say I can see at least 2 cloud belts on Jupiter with my 114GT. I'm sure you will get some good advice here. Don't give up.

#3 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 11:23 AM

Hopefully it is due to my light pollution, i am about a mag +2 max from where i am. I am on my balconey of my apartment with a ton of street lights all around me, so i am thinking that may be it, i just wanted some other opinions or suggestions :)

#4 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 11:51 AM

matthew, perhaps you were using too high of a magnification. 114mm of aperature will show you the disc rather nicely, but bump up the magnification too far and the image will be blurry and worthless. forget the filters until you get the image worked out. the image scale is likely to be rather small, that's just the way it is.

for fear of frostbite, perhaps you should wait until it's a little warmer out....

ds


#5 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 12:10 PM

I agree with ds your magnification might be too high with a 15mm and barlow, resulting in a 7.5mm. The 15mm alone should show you nice detail. Light pollution will not be a problem for Jupiter. Could be very bad seeing. Can you focus a star to a point?

#6 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 02:34 PM

I disagree about the magnification a little. I use a 5mm with a 2x barlow on my 114Gt. You do sacrifice some in the image but with Saturn and Jupiter you can go pretty high on the mag.

#7 Cow Jazz

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Posted 15 January 2004 - 07:59 PM

Yes, Rick, but bad seeing kills the higher mags quickly. I haven't had a chance to do much with my 114GT other than getting the go-to to work, but I do find bad seeing and high mag doesn't work.

John

#8 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 16 January 2004 - 03:18 AM

Hmm, that's odd. It must be the light pollution in your area, because I am able to just barely distinguish the belts/zones of jupiter using the 114GT and a 25mm stacked on top of a 3x barlow, NO filters.

#9 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 16 January 2004 - 02:45 PM

MatthewE,
Depending on where you live, you may also be getting interference from the jet stream. The jet stream tends to smear images. Stars don't twinkle, so the seeing appears to be good, but the images will be smeared and lacking detail. It was once so bad where I live that I couldn't tell Saturn had rings! Check http://www.cleardarksky.com for a clear sky clock that will give transparency (not usually a problem with planets), darkness (also not a problem) and seeing conditions for your area. Also, you can do a Google or other search for jet stream forcasts and see if you are under the jet stream.

#10 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 16 January 2004 - 11:55 PM

I can usually see 2 cloud belts with a 10mm, which is 100x,with my 114GT. Last night I used a 5mm and a 2x Barlow. As John and others pointed out, bad seeing and high mag. doesn't work well, but the views were still pretty good. Oh, I wasn't using a filter. I have a Orion's basic filter set but honestly I'm more impressed with Jupiter and Saturn's natural look.

#11 matt

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Posted 18 January 2004 - 12:47 PM

Are the satellites points or not? Does the edge of the disk appear sharp?
Usually any kind of scope should show at least the two dark (equatorial) belts.

Seeing more details requires a little practice and a good scope, but you should see at least that.

#12 yg1968

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Posted 26 January 2004 - 11:47 AM

I have had the same problem: I only see Jupiter as a white disk with its 4 moons. The temperature is also -30 C. So I didn't have time to figure it out either. Perhaps my eyes have to get used to the dark before I can see the Jupiter's cloud belts.

I did manage to see Saturn and its rings. Saturn is very small (even at with a 10mm lense) but you can see its rings.


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