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Oberwerks 20x60 vs. 15x70?

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#1 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 05:32 PM

I've decided to buy Oberwerks regardless, and this is partly an issue of cost (60s are $40 less) and partly a question of not knowing what to expect...is the greater light grasp with less magnification really better overall?
Will the 20x60s give me decent planetary detail or not?
I wanna hunt galaxies and clusters but I'd also like the best views of Mars and Jupiter possible for $100-$150.
Thanks for any replies... :confused:

#2 btschumy

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 05:47 PM

I wanna hunt galaxies and clusters but I'd also like the best views of Mars and Jupiter possible for $100-$150.

20x or 15x binoculars are the wrong instruments for looking at planets. Mars will probably only look like a reddish star. You will be able to see the moons of Jupiter and, if you've got especially good eyes and optics, you might be able to detect some banding. That's about it.

If you really want to get a better look at planets then you should pick up a used ST-80 or some other inexpensive achromatic refractor.

#3 NHRob

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 05:54 PM

Forget planetary detail with typical binos. You want high magnification, scope, and good mount for that.
Rob

#4 Glassthrower

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 08:31 PM

Forget planetary detail with typical binos. You want high magnification, scope, and good mount for that.


Even in my 25x100 binos, planetary detail is virtually non-existent. Bands of Jupiter are visible, but not prominent, against a small, milky featureless disc.

Saturn is visible as a tiny orangish/brownish disc with no detail apparent. Rings are distinct but on a very small scale with a division visible just barely with averted vision.

Mars is a reddish "disc" that almost stellar, with good skies and careful looking, a disc is more apparent.

Venus is a very bright, creamy white disc that will show phases with careful viewing, but no other detail.

Mercury - forget it, it's a red dot, utterly stellar.

That's my experience with planets through my big binos, definitely not for looking at planetary objects. Although the views of the moon are very nice, but in the 15-20x range, it will be on a much smaller scale than through a 25x even.

A 15x binoc, which I also use, is best (IMHO) for viewing open clusters, faint fuzzies, and "wide" views of interesting areas like Cygnus, Sagittarius, etc.

Good luck with whatever you decide to get though!

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#5 Joad

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Posted 02 August 2005 - 10:14 PM

I would definitely go with the 15X70. You will gather more light (essential for DSOs) and have a better chance at hand using them (it will be tough, but 20X60 is simply impossible--even if they are lighter than the 15X70s the magnification is too high to hand hold).

#6 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 07:21 AM

I agree with what everyone has said about planetary viewing. You just might see bands on Jupiter at 20x60. [The Earth - Jupiter distance was at a minimum a few months ago I think]. Saturn, you may see separation between the rings and the disc. At certain times you may see a cresant Venus. That's about it for planetary features. Everything else is point-like.

Magnification contributes more to increasing your limiting magnitude than aperture area. So for given seeing conditions, I would expect you to see more with 20x than 15x despite the 10mm aperture reduction.


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