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Out Door Perminant Observitory and Temperatures

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#1 Southpaw

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Posted 01 February 2004 - 04:09 PM

I am thinking about building a perminant observitory that I can store my scope in and use it for viewing out of. I am probably going to build one with a simple roll off roof. Does anyone have any idea what kind of temperatures a Meade 16" Starfinder can handle. I live in North Central Texas and the temperatures in the summer can be very hot. I do not want to put my scope through undo stress that could degrade it very quickly. I will probably include a good exhaust fan to pull in fresh air but would this be enough? Does anyone have any knowledge or understanding of what I could do? :question:

#2 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 01 February 2004 - 08:38 PM

Southpaw, sorry to butt in, but I have my own question along the same lines: I'll be getting an 8" dob, and rather than drag it in and out of the house, I'd like to store it in the unheated utility shed between viewings. In the winter at least, this will be pretty cold (sub zero occasionally). Cool down time will be minimized. Summers, it will be an oven in that shed some days.

Would I be risking anything storing it in the extremes (heat or cold)?

Just say the word, and I'll start another thread!

Thanks!

chuck

#3 Tom L

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Posted 01 February 2004 - 08:44 PM

Hi Chad, having lived in Central TX for over a decade, I know the heat/cold swings. The Observatory will have to be in the open and that means the sun. The fan(s) is as good as it will get unless you enclose it and heat/cool it...which I don't think you want to do. If you can get an airflow, then the temps should be ok for you because the changes occur slowly enough not to cause a problem. Too bad you can put it under a big oak tree!

#4 jrcrilly

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Posted 01 February 2004 - 08:56 PM

Too bad you can put it under a big oak tree!


I'm guessing that's a typo and you are stating, "Too bad you can't". The answer is that you can! Mine was in the shade of a big old tree until it mysteriously disappeared recently...

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#5 Tom L

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Posted 01 February 2004 - 09:24 PM

It was a typo! I remember my yard in TX was oaks, ash (about 5) and a big pecan tree. It was a great TX backyard since it was fully shaded...would have been terrible for astronomy (but not the driveway!).

#6 Southpaw

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Posted 01 February 2004 - 11:42 PM

Chucky, sounds like you have the same questions I am having so no I don't mind you joining in with your problem. It would be nice to heat or cool it but I think the heating would be easier than cooling it. I don't see that happening. I wonder if meade would have some input on this? And I do have a pretty good sized oak tree in the front yard. I have casters on my scope so I can roll it out of the garage and view. The tree does obstruct some of my view but I can't see cutting it down. By the way John that is a nice job you did on your observitory. Thanks guys for your input.

#7 Tom L

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Posted 01 February 2004 - 11:48 PM

Can't cut down an oak!!! Not what I meant. I would personally always find the best relief from the sun after working in it all day by sitting under an oak tree, with a nice cold long neck, that's all. Why? Air movement. Get the air moving in your shed or observatory and you will keep the inside temp at or under the outside temp. Put it on a solar switch or something. Good luck with it.

#8 imjeffp

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 12:46 PM

> keep the inside temp at or under the outside temp

Which could still easily reach 110° in August.

We always talk about cool-down, but now I'm wondering... What happens next summer when I take the scope out of the 78° house to the 90° evening air?

#9 Tom L

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 05:07 PM

But I don't think 110 degree heat will hurt it if it heats to that temp at a slow rate and you have some type of airflow. Don't forget that TX winters can get really cold also and you may have days with 40 degree swings...but it will do it slowly enough that the glass should have no problem. I would ask the manufacturer what the rated max temp is.

#10 Southpaw

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 05:38 PM

Thanks everyone. I will try to get in touch with meade and let you know what they say. Thanks for the info.


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