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#651 beanerds

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 08:03 PM

I think the old forums may have had a thread like this..

Here are the two scopes I have built, a 16" dob which I only have one photo handy. Guy grunting behind it is not me :)

The other is the 12.5" rc I did a little while back.

 My My , I was going thru a few old photos of starparties I have been top in NZ and look what I found !!! , taken same day , cool .

Brian.

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#652 pbunn

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 04:26 PM

My 6" F10 Newtonian with homemade Carbon Fiber tube.  The mirror is an outstanding Mark Harry mirror and the secondary was purchased from Edmund. The focuser is a 2" Moonlight. It is a big scope!

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#653 cpr1

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 10:46 PM

A few of mine...

 

10 inch compact

IMG_20131107_211318.jpg

 

 

12 inch gso rebuild my first attempt

2012 11 24 19 41 51 734

 

 

12.5 inch build

12.5 inch

Edited by cpr1, 19 January 2015 - 10:47 PM.

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#654 Oberon

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 01:43 AM

My old 200mm Dob, dug out of retirement (broken) and rebuilt with lightweight stainless steel office "trashcan" for UTA, fresh paint, new focuser and finder.

 

gallery_217007_4886_48573.jpg

 

After purchasing a Lunt Ha telescope I decided to rebuild my 200mm yet again now with a solid tube for solar observing, and for photographing ISS transits.

gallery_217007_4886_52962.jpg

 

Seen here out in the field early one sun shiny morning in the land of Oz...

 

gallery_217007_4886_37479.jpg

 

...and here are a few results; don't let anyone tell you you can't do astro-photography without an equatorial mount!

ISS transiting the sun.

gallery_217007_4886_64283.jpg
 

ISS overhead

gallery_217007_4886_8405.jpg

 

Lunar eclipse

gallery_217007_4886_24591.jpg

 

Saturn occultation

gallery_217007_4886_16349.jpg

 

Solar disc and sunspots

 

gallery_217007_4886_8708.jpg

 

and even high flying jet aircraft. This is a Boeing 787 Dreamliner flying overhead at 43,000 feet.

 

gallery_217007_4886_19576.jpg


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#655 han7720

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 11:01 AM

sorry...
Upload Photos failure... repost

This is my travel scope.

home made dall kirkham optics
D=250 ,primary mirror f3.5, fl=3000 , small yellow scope  D160mm primary mirror f4, fl=3200

dk250.jpg 160.jpg


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#656 Mike Clemens

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 08:31 PM

han7720 - gorgeous work !



#657 Oberon

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 10:21 AM

"Merope" is my new home build, a 16" f4.5 low profile portable Dob with some unusual perhaps even unique design features.

gallery_217007_4913_13305.jpg
 

The first thing you notice is the wire spider. While a wire spider is neither unusual or unique, this one is offset in more ways than one to maximise stability.

gallery_217007_4913_20975.jpg
 

The spider uses lockable guitar machine heads mounted in 12mm plastic blocks to secure it. Very neat, very simple. There is a CN thread here with more detail including a design.

 

gallery_217007_4913_59828.jpg

 

The UTA utilises laminated 2 ply carbon fiber sheet to plywood for added stiffness; probably a bit overboard but I had originally intended to laminate the CF onto balsa; when the balsa broke I reverted to ply and used the CF anyway for the look as much as anything. The red is a sheet of Formica (or Laminex), the same material I used for altitude bearings. The elastic strap holds the light baffle.


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#658 Oberon

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 10:24 AM

The mirror cell sits very low in a compact base. This was achieved with a relatively wide but flat azimuth section, essentially just a timber ring cut out of 3 layers of 25mm ply. See also workshop video.

 

gallery_217007_4913_72892.jpg

 

The altitude bearings recess into the ring, and the lowest part of the altitude bearing is actually lower than the azimuth bearing. Putting the azimuth mounts out wide creates an extremely stable base and permits the use of robust adjustable feet cut from 3/4" threaded rod and finished on top with threaded joiners. The shackles double as handles for more leverage and lifting points for hoisting the telescope in one piece onto the back of my SUV utility.

 

gallery_217007_4913_12659.jpg

 

The circular base cried out for setting circles, hence the adjustable feet for leveling. An iPhone sitting flat on the ring provides the level, which only takes seconds to achieve. The setting circles are printed on acrylic as a commercial sign (just send artwork and money to online provider) and glued then routed to finish. The previous picture shows the white azimuth pointer which rotates from the center pin and sits flush with the setting circle. It sweeps out about 70 degrees, which is a very ample tolerance for rough pointing North on initial setup.


Edited by Oberon, 01 February 2015 - 10:30 AM.

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#659 Oberon

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 10:28 AM

The most important - the most elegant and joy-to-use - feature of this telescope are the trusses. I twist them for collimation. Neither my mirror cell nor my secondary support are adjustable; they don't need to be, as the mirrors are very easily and quickly aligned by twisting the trusses. Essentially we have created a manually operated Stewart Platform, which have 6 degrees of freedom. This greatly simplifies robust mirror support, and simplifies collimation.

 

gallery_217007_4913_24740.jpg

 

The photo shows the laser collimation process for the secondary; simply twist any pair of trusses joined at the top in the same direction to tilt the UTA with respect to the primary.

 

To align the primary, simply twist the requisite pair of trusses joined at the bottom in the same direction; this tilts the primary with respect to the UTA.

 

With each twist we are extending or retracting one of the three 'legs' that support the mirror at which the trusses are joined, and so generating a corrective tilt. The combination of tilting top and bottom generates the effective lateral movement needed for alignment.

Another way to think of it is that the primary mirror is fixed, and you adjust the tube to align the secondary in all axis' including Z. Thats right...you can use this mechanism for focus too, although in practice you would only do so for crude initial setup. In my case I can adjust the focus sweet spot over a range of 60mm which makes construction tolerances very loose.

Finally, all alignments can be done while looking through the eyepiece, which makes star collimation much simpler and more intuitive.

 

gallery_217007_4913_45661.jpg

 

The trusses are all linked and are removed as one assembly. If you look closely you will see that the body of the rod ends (or Heim joints) are pressed tightly into the mirror cell and UTA; I did not want to risk any slop in the ball joint creating slop in the trusses. In retrospect it probably didn't matter in practice as the balls aren't loose, but in principle the method shown eliminates all risk of slop as well as having the benefit of linking all the trusses together into one assembly. Note that the green plastic blocks are not resting flat on the cell, they are only transferring tension from the screw into the ball joint which forces the head of the joint tightly into a V-groove cut into the cell, and into thin steel washers on the UTA. The washers and/or V joint define the location of the head. The result is that set up is very repeatable, virtually no adjustment is ever required (less than half a turn) from set up to set up, even months and thousands of road miles later.

Tip: I press fitted small magnets into the timber inside the V joints and washers to hold the joints in place during erection. This enables erection by a single person.


Edited by Oberon, 02 February 2015 - 04:24 AM.

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#660 Oberon

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 10:29 AM

Even the best telescope is annoying when it is difficult to relocate and set up.

 

gallery_217007_4913_4068.jpg

 

My solution took months to dream up as I toyed with and rejected design after design...but once I hit upon spoke-less bike wheels I laughed out loud. They are so cool! And so effective! I can wheel it up and down stairs, over gutters, through doorways and very easily over the roughest lawns. And standard sized wheels themselves just turned out to be the perfect size...how lucky was that! This is an early photo taken before the telescope was quite finished for another CN thread, and here is a video. Enjoy. 

Here is a close up showing how the pulleys sit on the wheel rim.

gallery_217007_4913_18790.jpg

Also shown above is the folding altitude pointer. The pointer has to fold down out of the way because the telescope packs flat...flat enough to fit in the boot (trunk) of an ordinary sedan.

gallery_217007_4913_87064.jpg

 

Note the wheels just fit neatly over the UTA and effectively take up zero storage space, which is quite astonishing given their size. Under the UTA are the altitude bearings laying flat on their side; they are exactly the same external diameter as the azimuth bearing, and the same internal diameter as the outside of the mirror cell. And the light baffle doubles as the UTA cover. So it all sits very snugly together and rolls forward up against the seat leaving enough space for two suitcases and other luggage. This means I can travel interstate in comfort with a 16" telescope, with wife and luggage to visit the grandchildren or perhaps include some dark sky observing on a road trip that takes in other sites and places.

 

gallery_217007_4913_54222.jpg

 

Would I change anything?

The only thing I would do differently is make the altitude bearings a little larger and the UTA a little lighter - more carbon, less plastic, steel and wood - so that I could get rid of the counterweights under the mirror cell. I might even fit a fan - I bought one for it - but haven't needed it so far in our warm dry environment. That might change in winter, but the shallow front helps the gentlest breeze blow rising thermals away from the mirror anyway. Not shown is the shroud that I use when observing around children.

gallery_217007_4913_13946.jpg

As you may have worked out by now, I'm pretty happy with this build.

And to think it started out as a "quick and dirty" precursor to the twin 16 portable dream binoscope I am planning...

:lol:


Edited by Oberon, 01 February 2015 - 10:34 AM.

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#661 GShaffer

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 11:39 AM

That is a truly awesome build...... Very NICE indeed.



#662 GShaffer

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 06:35 PM

The more I look at your 16" f/4.5 and consider the collimation method you are using the more I wonder why I have not seen this or a similar implementation before. I cant find fault with it. I also have less concerns with the wire spiders in your implementation since once you get it properly oriented in the light path it is more or less forget it, ie collimation of the entire UTA in yours.

I have a 12.5" f/5 DOB that is overbuilt to the max and had been considering a rebuild and am going to give serious thought to implementing a LOT of what I see in yours..... copy cats ARE the highest form of flattery :)

Again....NICELY done!!

#663 Oberon

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 07:05 PM

Thank you. Copy away. I do not know why this 'hexapod' or Stewart Platform truss collimation method hasn't been widely adopted as the standard; it truly simplifies everything to do with mirror support and has no downsides. I can only imagine people have difficulty conceptualizing the motions involved and give up, thinking it too complex. It isn't.

 

Although in a sense I 'invented' the arrangement in my head late one sleepless night, the design was so elegant and held so much promise I couldn't believe I was first to do so. And I wasn't. I soon found it was called a Stewart Platform and a search on that term with 'telescope' led me to Cloudy Nights where the concept was debated at length back in 2008 essentially in disbelief that it could work. Luckily I hadn't read the thread before convincing myself it would work or else I may not have built it. As it is, the concept works brilliantly and exceeded all my expectations. 

 

The implications for mirror support are huge. Because the Hexapod has 6 degrees of freedom there is zero need for any other alignment or adjustment mechanisms in the mirror support system. None at all. Zilch. Everything can be fixed firm and built solidly without risk of slop or flexure from any adjustment mechanism. 


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#664 GShaffer

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 08:42 PM

Thank you. Copy away. I do not know why this 'hexapod' or Stewart Platform truss collimation method hasn't been widely adopted as the standard; it truly simplifies everything to do with mirror support and has no downsides. I can only imagine people have difficulty conceptualizing the motions involved and give up, thinking it too complex. It isn't.
 
Although in a sense I 'invented' the arrangement in my head late one sleepless night, the design was so elegant and held so much promise I couldn't believe I was first to do so. And I wasn't. I soon found it was called a Stewart Platform and a search on that term with 'telescope' led me to Cloudy Nights where the concept was debated at length back in 2008 essentially in disbelief that it could work. Luckily I hadn't read the thread before convincing myself it would work or else I may not have built it. As it is, the concept works brilliantly and exceeded all my expectations. 
 
The implications for mirror support are huge. Because the Hexapod has 6 degrees of freedom there is zero need for any other alignment or adjustment mechanisms in the mirror support system. None at all. Zilch. Everything can be fixed firm and built solidly without risk of slop or flexure from any adjustment mechanism.


I just read the entire thread LOL.....You are correct there was mass disbelief however towards the end it appeared that a consensus was reached that it would work. Obviously it does..... The benefits regarding mirror mounting are enormous perhaps even more so than the collimation aspect.

I have 2 other projects to finish up (an 8" f/16 refractor and a 6" f/4.5 truss finder scope for my mirror box on my 20" Dob) but converting my 12.5" dob to this design will be #3.....

Thanks for posting your build.....its been a minute since I have been this excited about a design......

#665 han7720

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 11:32 AM

han7720 - gorgeous work !

 

Thank you =)

 

Amateur Telescope Making in South Korea... just 5-10 people remain...now

Because of  'made in china telescopes' price

so I lonely...

 

But few people are left to do great work. =)

 

some people making now...

18-20 inches CDK or 5~10 inches refractor binoculars,(use achromatic or apo lens cell )

 

Another South Korea atm people

http://blog.naver.com/hparksy

 

http://blog.naver.com/ksrns57 -> this binoculars photo (He is retired old mechanic. binoculars telescope enthusiasts. Produced a lot of binocular telescopes at the request of friends.... but professional sales does not.

Just for fun)

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Edited by han7720, 04 February 2015 - 12:10 AM.

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#666 Pierre Lemay

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 12:25 PM

 

han7720 - gorgeous work !

 

Thank you =)

 

Amateur Telescope Making in South Korea... just 5-10 people remain...now

Because of  'made in china telescopes' price

so I lonely...

 

But few people are left to do great work. =)

 

some people making now...

18-20 inches CDK or 5~10 inches refractor binoculars,(use achromatic or apo lens cell )

 

Another one

http://blog.naver.com/hparksy

 

han7720- beautiful, inspiring work. You maybe lonely in your country but you just made friends around the world. I want to see more. Thankss for posting.



#667 han7720

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 01:27 PM

 

 

han7720 - gorgeous work !

 

Thank you =)

 

Amateur Telescope Making in South Korea... just 5-10 people remain...now

Because of  'made in china telescopes' price

so I lonely...

 

But few people are left to do great work. =)

 

some people making now...

18-20 inches CDK or 5~10 inches refractor binoculars,(use achromatic or apo lens cell )

 

Another one

http://blog.naver.com/hparksy

 

han7720- beautiful, inspiring work. You maybe lonely in your country but you just made friends around the world. I want to see more. Thankss for posting.

 

Pierre Lemay -Thank you very much.

 

South Korea has only one ATM group.--> http://cafe.daum.net/scopemania

 

I was once a member. 



#668 Oberon

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:04 PM

Wow! Very beautiful. Very impressive.



#669 Pinbout

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:29 PM

 

South Korea has only one ATM group.--> http://cafe.daum.net/scopemania

 

my translator isn't all that great...

 

did someone copy Don Clemente's focuser?



#670 han7720

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 08:13 PM

 

 

South Korea has only one ATM group.--> http://cafe.daum.net/scopemania

 

my translator isn't all that great...

 

did someone copy Don Clemente's focuser?

 

 

Oberon- thank you =)

 

Pinbout-Modified similar focuser

 

His name is -man seong Lee.

he say that 

Clemente's focuser style Similar but some different , It is applied to the primary mirror movement systems

get some idear, July 2011 paper on the Modeling of cross pivots announced in Beijing Beihang University.

 

He is a person who ATM shafer complex optical system 20-inch. f=12

and has over 40 years atm experience.  made a lot of 5~8inch maksutov telescope and equatorial Mount.


Edited by han7720, 04 February 2015 - 03:10 AM.


#671 Pierre Lemay

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 01:32 PM

Thank you. Copy away. I do not know why this 'hexapod' or Stewart Platform truss collimation method hasn't been widely adopted as the standard; it truly simplifies everything to do with mirror support and has no downsides. I can only imagine people have difficulty conceptualizing the motions involved and give up, thinking it too complex. It isn't.

 

Although in a sense I 'invented' the arrangement in my head late one sleepless night, the design was so elegant and held so much promise I couldn't believe I was first to do so. And I wasn't. I soon found it was called a Stewart Platform and a search on that term with 'telescope' led me to Cloudy Nights where the concept was debated at length back in 2008 essentially in disbelief that it could work. Luckily I hadn't read the thread before convincing myself it would work or else I may not have built it. As it is, the concept works brilliantly and exceeded all my expectations. 

 

The implications for mirror support are huge. Because the Hexapod has 6 degrees of freedom there is zero need for any other alignment or adjustment mechanisms in the mirror support system. None at all. Zilch. Everything can be fixed firm and built solidly without risk of slop or flexure from any adjustment mechanism. 

Oberon, some of us have used the Stewart Platform principle in the past, without knowing it was called that (at least for me) until now. They are sometimes used on ball scopes. Here is part of what I wrote last year about my 20 inch ball scope in CN:

 

Because of the steep angle on the telescopes hemispherical tube's reinforcing ring, I couldn't use ball and sockets like those sold by Moonlite (not enough available angle). So I drilled the balls and added a 3 inch long, 5/16 inch diameter stainless steel threaded rod, which threads in the end cap of the truss tube. This provides plus or minus 1 inch of additional adjustment, which is very handy in aligning the UTA with the mirror and adjusting focuser position.

 

And here is the picture of the bottom part of my truss tube attachements (looks familiar?):

 

20 inch ball scope truss attachement.jpg

 

Not realizing when I designed it that I could have used that to collimate, I also designed a separate collimation system for both the primary and diagonal. However I did discover the Stewart Platform principle when I was putting the scope together and had to center the UTA with the bottom, it came in very handy. Also, adjusting the truss lengths was easier, as you mentionned already.  Another scope that used the Stewart Platform principle to collimate the optics, if I remember correctly, was Mike Linnolt's 20 inch ball scope. Like you, Mike exclusively used the variation of the trusses to collimate (for some reason that scope was sadly "decommissionned" and the Mirror recently sold here on CN).

 

A question on your scope: how much does it weigh. I think 16 inch f/4.5 is the sweet spot for the ideal portable amateur telescope and yours is one of the finest examples I've ever seen.  However I'm always interested in the operating weight of the telescope (including eyepiece, finder, batteries, etc.). Could you provide a breakdown of the components and the final weight of the instrument?

 

Again, congratulations on a fine piece of machinery! 


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#672 starman345

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 05:08 PM

Even the best telescope is annoying when it is difficult to relocate and set up.

 

gallery_217007_4913_4068.jpg

 

My solution took months to dream up as I toyed with and rejected design after design...but once I hit upon spoke-less bike wheels I laughed out loud. They are so cool! And so effective! I can wheel it up and down stairs, over gutters, through doorways and very easily over the roughest lawns. And standard sized wheels themselves just turned out to be the perfect size...how lucky was that! This is an early photo taken before the telescope was quite finished for another CN thread, and here is a video. Enjoy. 

Here is a close up showing how the pulleys sit on the wheel rim.

gallery_217007_4913_18790.jpg

Also shown above is the folding altitude pointer. The pointer has to fold down out of the way because the telescope packs flat...flat enough to fit in the boot (trunk) of an ordinary sedan.

gallery_217007_4913_87064.jpg

 

Note the wheels just fit neatly over the UTA and effectively take up zero storage space, which is quite astonishing given their size. Under the UTA are the altitude bearings laying flat on their side; they are exactly the same external diameter as the azimuth bearing, and the same internal diameter as the outside of the mirror cell. And the light baffle doubles as the UTA cover. So it all sits very snugly together and rolls forward up against the seat leaving enough space for two suitcases and other luggage. This means I can travel interstate in comfort with a 16" telescope, with wife and luggage to visit the grandchildren or perhaps include some dark sky observing on a road trip that takes in other sites and places.

 

gallery_217007_4913_54222.jpg

 

Would I change anything?

The only thing I would do differently is make the altitude bearings a little larger and the UTA a little lighter - more carbon, less plastic, steel and wood - so that I could get rid of the counterweights under the mirror cell. I might even fit a fan - I bought one for it - but haven't needed it so far in our warm dry environment. That might change in winter, but the shallow front helps the gentlest breeze blow rising thermals away from the mirror anyway. Not shown is the shroud that I use when observing around children.

gallery_217007_4913_13946.jpg

As you may have worked out by now, I'm pretty happy with this build.

And to think it started out as a "quick and dirty" precursor to the twin 16 portable dream binoscope I am planning...

:lol:

Beautiful telescope, both aesthetically and design wise, I am starting a 12.75" project and am contemplating changing my plan to incorporate some of your ideas.


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#673 Tavi

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 06:26 PM

Hi! Long time, no see.

 

This is my 110mm F/5.5 RFT refractor. The objective was not intended for astronomy and have serious spherical aberrations. A good friend of mine and a good optician saved it by make a special corrector lens. The performance of the refractor is better than a chinese 120mm F/6 (Skywatcher).

 

The tube is PVC pipe and the focuser is a home made crayford, someone else made the body and tube but I made the rest.

 

14184236276_50148cdc68_c.jpgIMG_0637 by Erwinux, on Flickr


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#674 mikey cee

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 07:01 PM

Clean looking little bugger! :waytogo:  Mike



#675 Kim K

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 07:04 PM

Very, very nice.  It's amazing what can be built at home!

 

Kim




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