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Most distant object you have observed?

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#51 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 05:40 PM

Stating that I've observed 3C 273 with a 4" refractor should indicate that it's not a particularly difficult target for the typical amateur telescope from a dark site.

Dave Mitsky

#52 ggalilei

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 05:53 PM

I'm guessing that a lot of people here do not have the level of experience or particularly dark location to be able to identify 3C273 in a 4 aperture. It took me several attempts to identify it in a 10" reflector from my "dark green" site, and I'm not entirely new to astronomical observations. Surely it can be done, but I think we should clarify for the general observer that it takes experience and a dark site (and this you mention). I was once after Polarissima Borealis and read a report of someone seeing it with a 4" refractor. Well, good for him, but it was a real struggle for me to catch a glimpse of it in the 10" reflector. I think it's fair to let people know of what is possible and what on the other hand is accessible to most.

#53 stevecoe

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 06:43 PM

John, et al;

I viewed APM 08279+5255 with Larry Mitchell's 36" f/5 Newtonian at the Texas Star Party. Larry had a section of the POSS that marked the location in Lynx. On a night I rated 7/10 for seeing and 8/10 for transparency, it was rather easy at 275X. It is amazing to realize what you are viewing at these distances and absolute magnitudes.

Clear skies;
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#54 jgraham

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 08:57 PM

Observing APM 08279+5255 always has a very moving effect on me. It is the farthest object within reach of amateur equipment lying near the very edge of the observable universe. A truly remarkable object.

#55 mtymak

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 02:04 AM

The Sombrero Galaxy from my front porch with my B&L reflector. ;)

Mauricio.

#56 havasman

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 02:40 PM

Blazar 3C 454.3 in Pegasus last night from the Atoka, Oklahoma dark site. It had been written up to have attained mag 13.4 but MAN it was dim dim dim. There's a good finder chart @ 2deg x 1.5 deg scale out on the web that takes you from IM Peg and that star's in the Pocket Sky Atlas.

http://www.universet...r-3c-454-3-i...

It's @ 7.7 GLY (only) but it was a kick for me.

#57 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 03:43 PM

I'm guessing that a lot of people here do not have the level of experience or particularly dark location to be able to identify 3C273 in a 4 aperture. It took me several attempts to identify it in a 10" reflector from my "dark green" site, and I'm not entirely new to astronomical observations. Surely it can be done, but I think we should clarify for the general observer that it takes experience and a dark site (and this you mention). I was once after Polarissima Borealis and read a report of someone seeing it with a 4" refractor. Well, good for him, but it was a real struggle for me to catch a glimpse of it in the 10" reflector. I think it's fair to let people know of what is possible and what on the other hand is accessible to most.


There's an archived report that I posted here on May 9th, 2005 available at http://www.cloudynig...434665/page/...

In a reply to that thread, David Knisely stated that he was able to detect 3C 273 with his 10" Newtonian stopped down to 94mm.

Today's observers are constantly pushing the envelope of what is visible visually. Brian Skiff of the Lowell Observatory has seen Pluto, a much more difficult target than 3C 273, with a 70mm Tele Vue Pronto refractor.

https://groups.yahoo...ons/topics/2451

https://groups.yahoo...ons/topics/2472

http://www.pietro.or...toVisualLog.htm

While I've seen it using a variety of larger telescopes, I've never been successful in observing Pluto with my 101mm Tele Vue refractor.

The point is that 3C 273 should be relatively easy to see under good conditions with an 8" or somewhat smaller aperture and a good finder chart. It certainly does not require a monster aperture to be seen, as is the case with some quasars, and I thought that my brief remark about seeing it with a 4" aperture readily indicated that fact.

Dave Mitsky

#58 Procyon

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 12:04 AM

Thanks, I will try and locate that quasar at a dark site.

I could never find Pluto in a 10", looked very hard one night. Uranus and Neptune were nice to find by star hopping.

#59 esd726

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 01:22 AM

Add another to the 3C 273 list

#60 FirstSight

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 12:03 PM

The girl I had a crush on in high school who wouldn't give me the time of day.

OH...you mean astronomical objects. Finding it on my own, Stephan's Quintet. Copping a peek through someone else's scope who had done the grunt work of finding it - a quasar.

#61 wpilon

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 12:15 PM

My most distant object to date is M49 which is about 56 million light years away.

But I've only been doing this seriously for about five months...


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