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What can you see through a 5" MakCass?

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#1 hapo

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 05:51 AM

I just ordered a 5" MakCass from Skywatcher as a portable solution for me. The scope will be here probably next week. What can you see through this 5" Mak? Planets... I know already, but what about deep-sky?

#2 Rick Denison

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 06:31 AM

There was a very useful thread back in August about what DSOs you could see with a 5-inch Mak. Check here.

#3 litespeed

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Posted 12 November 2005 - 10:22 PM

You can see plenty.

The important things for these scopes (for DSO's) are real dark skies, good seeing and long cool down times (depending on where you are at).

You will be pleasantly suprised at what these scopes can pull down under the right conditions.

#4 Kenny2004

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Posted 12 November 2005 - 10:43 PM

I think you'll see plenty of DSO's -- firsthand experience. It all depends on your skies. If it's dark enough and seeing is great, you'll see all what the bigger aperature scopes can see(within Magnitude range capability of the 5"). Larger aperature means great detail in what you'll see. So through a 5" you'll see few stars in a globular cluster than you would in an 8". Likewise M57 details will be more evident. Bottom line is you'll see DSO, but the details will change depending on the aperature.

#5 hapo

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Posted 14 November 2005 - 04:49 AM

Thanks Kenny and litespeed for comments. I expect my scope to be here on Tuesday and if the weather remains as good as now I'll check this little scope. I wish I had the money for a 6", but...

#6 johnmkanz

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 10:39 AM

You can do what we all do, which is enjoy this scope, take real good care of it, and when you've saved up the difference in price, put it on Astromart and buy a bigger scope! It's an addiction, really....
John Kanzler
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Intes MN61
Orion Argonaut (another MN61)
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#7 Darren1968

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 10:50 AM

I own a 5" MakCass and have gone through a large learning curve over the past 8 months.

I definitely agree with the comments about dark skies and great seeing conditions. These make the biggest difference. However, I also think it's important to have the right accessories: focal reducer, quality e.p., barlow, etc.

I have definitely had some great views of both planets and DSO's through my scope. The best views have come after I have processed a captured image with my ToUcam and stacked it in Registax. This is when I really appreciate what the scope can do.

Darren

#8 litespeed

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 08:29 PM

You can do what we all do, which is enjoy this scope, take real good care of it, and when you've saved up the difference in price, put it on Astromart and buy a bigger scope! It's an addiction, really....
John Kanzler
Intes Micro MN56
Intes MN61
Orion Argonaut (another MN61)
250mm GS dob


Yup..... Or keep it and turn it into a guide scope? He.. He.. He... :shocked:

Or a big telephoto lens. I have used mine with my 20D and OM-1 for some daytime pics in the swamp.

#9 hapo

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 04:46 AM

I was actually thinking at the main ideea: use the scope and sell it someday in order to buy a bigger one. Except only that I'll probably want one bigger than 6", so it will be a SCT. I am considering saving for a 9,25 Celestron SCT with XLT coatings.

BTW, it will be Friday the arriving day. Which doesn't matter anymore, the weather has gone bad and it will remain so until the next week.

#10 ccvle

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 08:07 PM

where do you live? I recently upgraded from a 127mm orion mak to an 8" celestron sct. I live in NYC and the light pollution is bad here, but it is capable of seeing some very bright DSOs.

#11 hapo

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 04:38 AM

@ccvle, I live in Europe, and in my region light pollution is not very bad, in good days we have 5.5, 6 mag skies.

#12 karim

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 04:32 PM

One suggestion to get better performance out of your scope is to a get a good diagonal from Televue or Astro-Physics, this can give the effect of adding about an inch of aperture.

#13 Kenny2004

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 10:22 AM

Hapo: did you get your scope yet? Waiting for your first light report. Ah yes, the excitement of a new scope -- makes me wanna go out and buy another :)

#14 hapo

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 01:23 PM

@Keny2004: The transport company just postponed my arriving day until Monday due to customs delays. So Monday it will be mine. But that doesn't change the weather we have now: it started to snow today and the sky is all covered.

#15 Kenny2004

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 03:54 PM

Hapo: You must live in Canada then :) That's too bad about the scope. Customs are always a hold up, but hopefully it'll clear up when you get it. But the universal law of astronomy: it'll probably be cloudy -- happens to all of us when we get new equipment.

Hope the scope arrives safely and on time!

#16 hapo

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 06:14 AM

The scope finnaly arrived and on a visual daylight inspection it arrived in perfect condition. The tube is OK, no dent, just 1 or 2 dust particles on the corrector plate. The mount EQ3-2 is OK, it holds the tube firmly and doesn't shake a bit, even if i try to shake it.

Too bad that it is now snowing and the sky is all covered.

#17 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 01:57 AM

I just ordered a 5" MakCass from Skywatcher as a portable solution for me. The scope will be here probably next week. What can you see through this 5" Mak? Planets... I know already, but what about deep-sky?


The Mak is THE planet scope with EXTREMELY SHARP optics. If you move on to another scope, keep this one for planets!

DSO, eh.... not so hot. The Mak has a VERY tight field of view. So seeing those expansive DSO's like M31 will be better served by another scope.

Still, you should be able to see the 99.9% of what an 8" scope will see - although with a very slight less amount of detail. Although many may prefer the Mak for DSO's because of it's spectacular sharpness only rivaled by a big bulky refractor costing so much more.

Great scope. Congratsulations!

#18 jrcrilly

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Posted 23 November 2005 - 05:15 AM

DSO, eh.... not so hot. The Mak has a VERY tight field of view. So seeing those expansive DSO's like M31 will be better served by another scope.


I dunno about "very tight". It'll be too narrow for M31 under dark skies - but it's only a tiny bit longer (1540mm v. 1500mm - about 3%) than the 12" Newt you described as having a "very wide" FOV. It'll top out at around 1.08 degrees (32mm Plossl) compared to about 1.5 degrees for the Newt. The only reason the Mak will have a narrower max FOV is the smaller focuser. If the Mak could handle 2" EP's it'd have a wider max FOV (about 1.8 degrees with a 41mm Pan) than the Newt due to the slower F ratio permitting longer eyepieces.

I think of a "very wide" FOV as being several degrees and a "very tight" FOV as being much smaller than one degree.

#19 Guest_**DONOTDELETE**_*

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 02:54 PM

DSO, eh.... not so hot. The Mak has a VERY tight field of view. So seeing those expansive DSO's like M31 will be better served by another scope.


I think of a "very wide" FOV as being several degrees and a "very tight" FOV as being much smaller than one degree.


You are correct.


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