Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Quark?

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
68 replies to this topic

#1 Doug Culbertson

Doug Culbertson

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7449
  • Joined: 06 Jan 2005

Posted 01 April 2014 - 03:11 PM

Is anyone familiar with this new product from Daystar? Any thoughts on it? If it works well, it would be cheaper turning my 102mm refractor into a solar scope than buying a similar sized Lunt, although I am sure that the Lunt would provide a better view.

#2 The Ardent

The Ardent

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 4404
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2008

Posted 01 April 2014 - 03:16 PM

Will it work with binoviewers?

#3 Doug Culbertson

Doug Culbertson

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7449
  • Joined: 06 Jan 2005

Posted 01 April 2014 - 03:18 PM

I was wondering the same thing. I would be interested in using it with binoviewers and a Mallincam.

#4 steveward53

steveward53

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2581
  • Joined: 14 May 2012

Posted 01 April 2014 - 03:18 PM

And you need two to cover chromsphere and proms , at $995.00 each ... :question:

#5 Doug Culbertson

Doug Culbertson

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7449
  • Joined: 06 Jan 2005

Posted 01 April 2014 - 03:21 PM

And you need two to cover chromsphere and proms , at $995.00 each ... :question:


As one who is not really all that familiar with Ha observing, do most of the current Ha filters and/or telescopes also show chromosphere? My only experience is with a previously owned PST, and I don't recall seeing chromosphere with it.

#6 steveward53

steveward53

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2581
  • Joined: 14 May 2012

Posted 01 April 2014 - 04:58 PM

The chromosphere is what you see in Ha , well one emmision line that is. The photosphere is what is viewed in 'whitelight'.

#7 The Ardent

The Ardent

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 4404
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2008

Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:20 PM

I looked thru a Lunt 80mm DS Thursday, very very very impressive view of surface and proms.

I wonder if the prominence Quark will show some surface detail, and vice versa. I can't believe each one is "all or nothing"

Sad thing is - the scope I'll have at Neaf is f/20, and my 3" scope is f/16. I will ask Daystar if they have an optional 2x Quark lens for those longer scopes. The 4x factor is too much.
We'll see.

#8 Doug Culbertson

Doug Culbertson

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7449
  • Joined: 06 Jan 2005

Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:21 PM

Thanks, Steve. I have spent 24 years observing DSOs, and probably not much more than 24 hours on Sol.

#9 cptbobrfh

cptbobrfh

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 373
  • Joined: 09 Dec 2007

Posted 01 April 2014 - 06:49 PM

Daystar site does not state in its Quark description if your scope needs an ERF and/or IR filter,which would increase total price by a lot! It would be nice to know the ~band passes available for the chromosome filter or the prominence filter?Hope to hear from Daystar on this soon.

#10 steveward53

steveward53

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2581
  • Joined: 14 May 2012

Posted 01 April 2014 - 07:17 PM

No ERF needed.

#11 Starman81

Starman81

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 3668
  • Joined: 06 Mar 2008

Posted 01 April 2014 - 09:41 PM

Seriously, I thought it was an April Fool's joke. If real, it looks pretty nice!

#12 Eddgie

Eddgie

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 24046
  • Joined: 01 Feb 2006

Posted 01 April 2014 - 10:16 PM

Note that for a full disk, it is good on scopes up to 450mm of focal lenght.

That means that if you like full disk, you are going to have to use a very small telescope and if you don't already have a small telescope with 450mm focal length, that is something else one would need to buy.

My guess is that this will make it difficult to use binoviewers as well because it would appear that it needs to be pretty close to the focal plane.

And given the price, a Lunt 60T with a BF1200 is not all that more expensive, and will binoview beautifully.

Clever idea though, but again, Lunt 60T with BF1200 is only about $300 more with nothing else to buy.

Still, for someone that does not need full disk and wants to use a much larger aperture, might be a very useful tool.

And even with the PST, you get full disk. I was pretty impressed with the PST at $600.

#13 TOMDEY

TOMDEY

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3995
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2014

Posted 01 April 2014 - 10:18 PM

Gracious! It IS April 1st... I saw the AD on Astromart and thought I understood how etalons work very well. I have three DS LUNTs 80/80, 80/80 and 60/60 (intending to turn the two 80s into "true" binoculars!) So this eyepiece thing seems too good to be true - especially at that price. I'm a retired optical engineer etc. and feel pretty foolish 'cause I just can't see how an f/4 feed...well it becomes f/16.8 if the telecentric barlow is 4.2X. But then the focal length would be quadrupled so how can a 450mm efl scope show the entire solar disc? If this (pair) works as well and as easily as they say...I've sure wasted a LOT of $$$. It's gota be real - Anacortes wouldn't jerk us around. I'm worried about myself 'cause I'm too spontaneous. Evidence the scopes already mentioned plus 3 domes, 10 high-end binox, deep sky scopes 29 and 36-inch. I DO worry about pumping the raw sun down an f/4 instrument plus diagonal to arrive at the magical Ha eyepiece. Wouldn't that risk FRYING something black down near the gizmo? My 29-inch is f/4.5 and I sure wouldn't point that at the sun else risk burning the entire observatory down! Well - I DO use my old 4-inch f/5 Genesis with the LUNT Herschel Wedge... The one thing that DOES bother me is they explicitly state they will NOT quote anything regarding bandwidth. Must resist - Must resist...

#14 shkong

shkong

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 183
  • Joined: 18 Jan 2013

Posted 02 April 2014 - 12:48 AM

Recently, I had been to solar observing party.

I had never done any attempt to observe sun before.

it was a quite a shock to see lot of details thorough Ha filter.

I also found that DayStar will introduce new Ha filter Eyepiece which may make it easy newbie like me to attempt solar observation.


To have full view of sun, I may use Televue 76 and use AT 111EDT for magnfified view .

I am more interested in "Promninence"model.

Will it work safely without ERF filter?

thanks

Thomas

#15 LarryAlvarez

LarryAlvarez

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4213
  • Joined: 12 Aug 2005

Posted 02 April 2014 - 04:47 AM

Must resist - Must resist...


:borg: Resistance it Futile!

Looks cool buy what I'm worried about is the lack of specifics on the bandpass and the fact that it is one or the other, surface or proms. Also, what would it cost to get the blockers replaced in this? It certainly looks cool but may be best to see it at Neaf in action before jumping in. It seems like it would get really smoking hot in the back of the scope with no ERF. :question:

#16 bandazar

bandazar

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 373
  • Joined: 19 Oct 2005

Posted 02 April 2014 - 06:27 AM

why not just get a regular daystar filter if you want to binoview. The eyepiece system appears to be similar to what they already have, more or less, except they integrate the telecentric barlow with the ERF, put a integrated blocking filter, and put the system after the eyepiece holder instead of before it. Maybe they also have a reducer at the other end? I don't know. It will be interesting to see what the views are like. From my personal experience, daystar filters are not as good as coronado or lunt because of the narrow field of view. Detail also is usually superior in the lunt and coronados in the examples I've seen, but that could just because people are using "cheap" systems that do not maximize the potential of the daystar (which is my suspicion). But then again, I have not looked through this, so could be wrong. Suspect it's performance will vary a lot depending on the setup.

#17 cptbobrfh

cptbobrfh

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 373
  • Joined: 09 Dec 2007

Posted 02 April 2014 - 11:07 AM

I am very interested how the Quark would work on my Orion 100 mm Achromat.For many years I have wanted a way to use my Achromat with a Ha filter near the eyepiece that could utilize the larger aperture,without spending many thousands of dollars.My concern with this new Ha eyepiece is do the coatings on the nighttime scope affect the visual view of the sun.

#18 Eddgie

Eddgie

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 24046
  • Joined: 01 Feb 2006

Posted 02 April 2014 - 11:07 AM

I still think that given the price point, a tilt tuned Lunt 60 is a far better deal.

While you might be able to use this eyeppice with larger scopes, seeing is often limiting even the Lunt 60!.

And I love seeing the full disk. I don't think I would enjoy the sun nearly as much if I were limited to seeing only a part of it. It is the totality of the view that makes it exciting to me.

I spent a lot of time with the Lunt and a Baader z00m to find a great magnification and as it turned out, 50x was about the most I could use most of the time on most days before detail started to wash out.

But the good news was that even with a 15mm Plossl pair (the zoom was just to find the right magnicition but I like winged eye guards and cannot use them with a z00m), the whole disk easily fit into the 50X field.

I feel like the Lunt 60, as expenisve as it is, offers a great balance between weight, resolving power, cost, and flexibility (binoviewers are great on the Lunt 60).

Again, I do have to give them credit for a cool idea.

But I just can't help but belive that a Lunt 60 with BF1200 is a tought competitor. Even seeing this, I am still happy with the Lunt 60.

#19 skyward_eyes

skyward_eyes

    Vendor - Sky-Watcher USA

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 5005
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2006

Posted 02 April 2014 - 12:34 PM

They say they will have these at NEAF. I can always check it out and return details back. I am sure others will also be at NEAF.

#20 Doug Culbertson

Doug Culbertson

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 7449
  • Joined: 06 Jan 2005

Posted 02 April 2014 - 12:45 PM

They say they will have these at NEAF. I can always check it out and return details back. I am sure others will also be at NEAF.


I won't be at NEAF, but I sure would like to hear any details about the Quark.

While I am sure that the Lunt 60/BF1200 would provide just as good, if not a better image of the sun, it costs 2x as much as the Quark. I am not enough of a solar enthusiast to part with that kind of cash.

#21 Hegerberg

Hegerberg

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 229
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2008

Posted 02 April 2014 - 01:46 PM

Hi All,

This may have something to do with, on how it works.

http://www.daystarfi...iew/article/...

Regards

Bruce

#22 David Knisely

David Knisely

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16947
  • Joined: 19 Apr 2004

Posted 03 April 2014 - 01:29 AM

I have to really scratch my head over this "new" product. I own a DayStar 0.7 angstrom T-Scanner and have used it for many years in both my 10 inch f/5.6 Newtonian (stopped to 90mm and teleextended to f/39) and my 90mm Mak-Cassegrain successfully. However, from my experience using Daystar filters, this one has me puzzled. No ERF?? Gad, that sucker is going to get HOT in a hurry (even in my 100mm f/6). I am not bothered that it will work at fairly short f/ratios, as with the right telecentric optics, that can easily be done. The second thing that has me going is the "prominence" vs. "chromosphere" models. Generally, a "prominence" filter is a broader one (1.5 angstrom to 0.8 angstrom bandwidth), while I would assume one designed for the "chromosphere" would show disk detail which requires something less than 0.8 angstroms or so for adequate contrast. Also, both versions selling for the same price??? That doesn't make sense either, as the narrower the filter passband, the more expensive the etalon is to make. Daystar really needs to put out more specifics about this filtering system. Right now, I have a lot more questions than answers about this thing. Clear skies to you.

#23 AstroPaolo

AstroPaolo

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 923
  • Joined: 30 Jan 2008

Posted 03 April 2014 - 05:42 AM

really curious about this new toy, if any of your will test it at neaf let us know. my daystar filter is at their laboratory, i could ask if they send me one in the same case eheh

#24 bandazar

bandazar

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 373
  • Joined: 19 Oct 2005

Posted 03 April 2014 - 06:58 AM

well, if they simply use existing daystar technology, maybe we could speculate on what would happen based on what we already know. A design after the eyepiece offers some advantages and disadvantages. One main advantage of course that if you put things after the eyepiece, you can miniaturize components, thereby saving costs. This is perhaps why both types of eyepieces cost the same. The ERF is probably very small.
The main disadvantage of this system, I suspect (and I stress this), is that optical tolerance is going to be less, since you are dealing with a tighter light cone. A misaligned diagonal or very bad optics could amplify problems in this system.
And as with current daystar technology, this system will produce better results with longer focal system telescopes. Though this would narrow the potential field of view even more.

#25 Tom Polakis

Tom Polakis

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2078
  • Joined: 20 Dec 2004

Posted 03 April 2014 - 09:55 AM

And given the price, a Lunt 60T with a BF1200 is not all that more expensive, and will binoview beautifully.


But isn't the Lunt 60T a dedicated solar scope? What distinguishes Daystar's product is that it's a very simple accessory to convert any existing scope for H-alpha viewing. I recognize that I'm posting on a solar observing forum, but I think there's a market for folks who want to use a single apo refractor for deep-sky by night, and solar by day. That's the reason I absolutely love the elegance of using a Lunt solar wedge in my ED127. A single component that changes that same scope (or an even larger refractor) into something that can see the chromosphere sounds very attractive.

The mandatory 4.2x magnification is going to be a deal breaker for a lot of potential customers. I don't know, though. Put a 32mm eyepiece in a TV101 with 540mm of focal length, and that produces 71x with the Quark in the path. That's full disc (albeit with a 6mm exit pupil), but is the filter sharp across a half degree?

This phrase bothers me as well: "Exact filter bandpass will vary based on final telescope application..." There is not an infinite number of telescope applications out there, so why not make a chart that gives bandpass for various telescopes? Finally, wouldn't the "chromosphere" model also show prominences, since it's tunable?

Again, I think the attraction (at least to people like me) is that this is similar to a Herschel wedge, but for H-alpha viewing. Sure will be nice to hear a full report from people who attend NEAF.

Tom


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics