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OneSky Newtonian - Astronomers without borders

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5216 replies to this topic

#2651 FlankerOneTwo

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 10:23 PM

 

I used black plastic poster sheets from Blick art supply for a light shield. $2.39. The 22" width is enough to make 2, or you can double it up for additional rigidity.

https://www.dickblic...ic-posterboard/

FlankerOneTwo, I just picked up a sheet of this stuff. How did you attach the two edges to form the tube? Hot glue? Gaffer's tape? Rivets?

Inquiring minds want to know!

 

I just used black duct tape out the outside.


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#2652 FlankerOneTwo

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 10:25 PM

Can this be mounted on a tabletop power/object tracker base?

Not sure exactly which you have in mind, but it has a standard Vixen rail on it. You can mount it on something like the iOptron cube or any standard mount (alt-az or equatorial) that accepts Vixen rails.



#2653 Gilraen

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 10:31 PM

 

Can this be mounted on a tabletop power/object tracker base?

Not sure exactly which you have in mind, but it has a standard Vixen rail on it. You can mount it on something like the iOptron cube or any standard mount (alt-az or equatorial) that accepts Vixen rails.

 

I need a base that's more hands free to move.



#2654 Lazaroff

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 10:35 PM

Gilraen, check this out:

https://www.youtube....h?v=EAc0m7uuHk4

 

Also, try searching this topic for the word "Virtuoso."

 

Good luck!


Edited by Lazaroff, 11 February 2018 - 05:06 PM.

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#2655 Stargazer3236

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 11:45 AM

Here are some pictures, of the Onesky Newtonian, nestled inside my new Nikon camera bag, I purchased from Adorama. https://www.adorama.com/nklpb.html

 

Nikon.jpg

 

Nikon2.jpg

 

Nikon3.jpg


Edited by Stargazer3236, 11 February 2018 - 11:46 AM.

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#2656 Stargazer3236

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 11:55 AM

Here is a pic of my newly installed light shroud on my Onesky:

 

Onesky.jpg

 

 


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#2657 matthannan

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 04:19 PM

I'm caught up! 

The timeline did not seem to change too much once I read my own first port. wink.gif

 

StarGazer3236, that bag looks awesome! Gaffer's tape ordered from B &H. I need to grab some double-sided tape to do the initial fit and build. This posterboard has a mind of its own. 


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#2658 jordonb

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 07:38 PM

Hello, all.

I recently received my One Sky. I took it out last night and was blown away by it. I am very satisfied overall. However, I have an issue with the RDF. No matter what I do, I cannot get it to aim correctly. I run out of adjustment before I can get the red dot on target. The left and right are adjustable-ish. I have to have it maxed out to the left. The up and down is what I am having a problem with. It will not go any lower. I was able to use it to find targets but I had to have the dot about a degree above the target. It's not a deal breaker but I would like to make sure I'm not doing anything wrong. I installed everything per instructions and got everything collimated. I have even used a screwdriver to adjust the alt-az and I still can't get enough travel out of it. I am 99% sure I have it mounted properly on the rails. Any thoughts? I have seen Mike Simmon on here. Any chance it's just a bad RDF?

 

I also had a question about this light shroud I keep seeing on everyone's scopes. Why do you need it? I went to a dark site last night where there was virtually no light pollution. Everything looked great. My question is could it look better than what I was seeing even though I was in a dark site?

 

I also would like to purchase some more lenses. There seems to be some hate for the Celestron Kit w/filters from amazon.com. Is this just optical snobbery or should I just avoid it like the plague and just buy a few more expensive EP. I am not currently interested in astrophotography with this scope. So keep that in mind when suggesting some EPs. Sorry for the multitude of questions, but I want to get my questions answered. 

 

I also have a question about the secondary mirror. Is it supposed to wiggle left and right for adjustment? If not, well, mine wiggles. My only concern is that is will wiggle out of collimation.

 

If you need pictures, let me know. I can take some and upload them here.


Edited by jordonb, 11 February 2018 - 07:51 PM.


#2659 cookjaiii

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 08:01 PM

Welcome to the OneSky club.  

 

A lot of people have had problems aligning the RDF.  There were discussions early in this thread that you may be able to find using the Search function at the upper right of this page.

 

Some of the solutions involve shimming (not ideal).  I had difficulty at first, but I took apart the mounting clamp and turned it around, swapped sides, and somewhere among all the permutations a configuration was found that fixed the problem.  I was just lucky, I guess.  Maybe it will work for you.

 

The light shroud is to block stray light from light pollution.  It might give a slight improvement at a dark site, but I doubt it.

 

The eyepiece & filter kit is not a good value in my opinion.  You will get a dizzying amount of recommendations for eyepieces.  Decide on a budget first.  You don't need a lot of eyepieces, and you will appreciate quality as your experience grows.  I like buying used, so I can get most of my money back out if I don't like it.

 

Good luck.  You are going to have a blast with this little powerhouse.


Edited by cookjaiii, 11 February 2018 - 08:03 PM.

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#2660 Stargazer3236

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 08:09 PM

jordonb, my secondary stalk seems to wiggle left and right with a certain amount of pressure from my fingers. However, it will stay still when not being touched. But it does help when aligning the mirrors.

 

For eyepieces, buy what you can afford. I have heard that  the Nagler 13T6 eyepiece does a great job for medium power, as does the Nagler 5T6 for high power. People have been claiming that the Zoom eyepiece of 8mm-24mm does a good job, like the Celestron zoom. I am not concerned with eyepieces because I plan to do imaging and EAA (electronically assisted astronomy). You can use the less expensive Explore Scientific 82* eyepieces, like the 9mm, 14mm, 4.7 or 6.7. They give just as good views than the Televue Naglers. Some have suggested the William Optics UWAN eyepieces too.

 

The light shroud is needed, because a lot of us live near light polluted areas and the light shield will block a lot of the stray light from entering our telescope tubes. I live in a Red zone, near the city of Boston. The only way I can get to dark skies, is to travel up to New Hampshire, 120+ miles away from my home, there I can get mind numbing darkness, but that trip is not always feasible on a weekday night.

 

I would skip the RDF altogether. I plan on using the Orion 6x30 right angled finder scope along with my Rigel Quik Finder too. But when I attach the telescope to my iOptron ZEQ25 center balanced mount, my goto's are nearly 100% accurate. But every once in a while, the mount has a mind of its own and sometimes does not always get to the object. So I use the Rigel Quik finder to re-center it.



#2661 MSimmons

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 09:12 PM

 Any chance it's just a bad RDF?

Hi jordonb,

 

Yes, there's a chance it's a bad RDF. We have had a lot of problem with this. I don't know if it's the RDF or the mount or a combination but it happens too often.

 

Sometimes people have taken the RDF out all the way and then put it back and everything is OK. So it seems the range of adjustment is somehow set when you put it in (too high in your case). Take it out, set the adjustments in the center each way, and then slip it back in while holding it to point where it should. It might work, might not.

 

If nothing works then we owe you an RDF. Let me know.

 

Clear skies,

 

Mike


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#2662 Stargazer3236

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 09:16 PM

In case you need a link for Gaffer's Tape: https://www.bhphotov...pe_black_1.html

 

$1.95 a roll.


Edited by Stargazer3236, 11 February 2018 - 09:17 PM.


#2663 Lazaroff

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 10:08 PM

jordonb,
 
Congratulations on your OneSky. You'll love it! I hope it will help to read a few more answers to your questions.
 
1. Finder. If simply fiddling with the finder doesn't work, you'll need to very slightly raise the rear of the finder in order to move the red dot downwards in the sky. You can do this easily by shimming the finder shoe on the scope. There's no need to alter the finder itself.
 
Take the stack of staples out of a stapler and pry off one staple. That staple will be the shim. It will be attached to the lower end of the scope's finder shoe, with the two prongs sitting in the grooves on either side of the shoe. Because the staple is a little wider than the grooves, bend both prongs inward so they grip the grooves tightly. Slide the finder onto the shoe from the rear, with the staple beneath it, tighten the mounting screws, and try it. You should then be able to align the finder properly.
 
If the shim works, there's one more thing to do to make sure sure the staple stays put. Remove the finder, cut a narrow piece of plastic tape--electrical tape will do--and wrap it lengthwise over the top of the shoe, over the staple, and through the "tunnel" beneath the shoe. Make the tape long enough to loop entirely around and overlap itself. (That's what I did. You could just glue the staple to the shoe.) You're done.
 
2. Light shroud. You'll want one eventually. You won't always be in a dark site. At the very least, on some nights a bright moon will be up. Try searching this topic for the word "shroud." You'll get so many ideas your head will spin.
 
3. Eyepieces. I suggest living for a while with the stock eyepieces before considering buying anything else. When you're ready to replace them you'll find lots of recommendations here--many for very expensive eyepieces. I had something to say about this last December (page 102, post 2549). Look it up if you like.
 
4. Secondary mirror. It shouldn't wiggle. Use a wrench to tighten the hex nut at the top of the finder stalk.

To be safe: (a) point the telescope sideways so you can't drop the wrench on the primary mirror if you have a sudden need to sneeze. (b) You may need to hold the secondary mirror's mount so it won't rotate while you tighten the nut. Put a clean cloth glove (lacking that, a clean sock) on your hand, just to make sure you don't put a fingerprint on the mirror.


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#2664 jordonb

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Posted 11 February 2018 - 10:51 PM

 

 Any chance it's just a bad RDF?

Hi jordonb,

 

Yes, there's a chance it's a bad RDF. We have had a lot of problem with this. I don't know if it's the RDF or the mount or a combination but it happens too often.

 

Sometimes people have taken the RDF out all the way and then put it back and everything is OK. So it seems the range of adjustment is somehow set when you put it in (too high in your case). Take it out, set the adjustments in the center each way, and then slip it back in while holding it to point where it should. It might work, might not.

 

If nothing works then we owe you an RDF. Let me know.

 

Clear skies,

 

Mike

 

Alright, so I tried some things. I tried re-mounting the RDF to some avail, but not really. So what I noticed, is the front of the RDF (lens) was rubbing up against the front of the body/housing. So, when I would try to make it go down further, it rubbed and stopped descending. I was able to use a file to file that plastic down a little bit. That seemed to have done it, but only barely. It is functional now. That seems to be the issue though. I was also able to stop the wobble in the secondary mirror. I had to tighten the mirror to the nut inside the housing on the back of it and then the top nut on the finder stalk. So, all in all, I think everything is fixed. I understand at the 200$ there are slight manufacturing flaws, and I appreciate the quick response. I think I can make this work, if it gets worse or anything I'll let you know. Thanks.



#2665 MSimmons

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 12:22 AM

Good to hear. If there are any further issues don't hesitate to contact me. Whatever the price might have been, you're entitled to what you paid for. And honestly we don't hear of problems too often (other than the effects of UPS playing basketball with the packages).

 

Mike


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#2666 matthannan

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 09:53 PM

Snuck out tonight because it was the first night with both clear skies and reasonable temps since the last time I went out.

So, Second Light!

 

I have a faulty RDF (aims high), but I am not going to bother MSimmons about it. I'll figure something else out.

In fact, it wasn't even on the telescope when I brought it outside. Figured I would just learn how to point and shoot with the 25mm. I think a GLP is out for me. Turns out, there is a small airfield not very far from me. Could be two miles as the crow flies. Probably a bit more, but I don't think I want to chance it.

 

I managed to find Pleiades this time. Wow! There is a lot more going on there than your bare eyes would have you believe! And it is even more beautiful, as a result.

I also managed to find some part of Orion when I was feeling brave and zooming around with the 2x Barlow and the 10mm installed; looking for bunches of bright objects.

Did I just see a nebula? I need to hit these books I got from the library (Turn Left and NightWatch) to make sure, but I think I just saw my first nebula!

SO much to learn!

 

Polaris is blocked for me, due to a giant walnut tree in my backyard, so I tried to take a look at the Big Dipper. Unfortunately, the lights from my across the street neighbor's house were bouncing right off the lens, so I couldn't see a darned thing. Thanks, neighbors. What are you doing over there? Landing UFOs?

 

The Super Simple Tripod worked a treat. I think I need to take the legs down about 2 or 3 inches. It was just a touch too high. Easier to cut them down than to build them up, so no big deal.

I think the plastic posterboard light shroud did its job, too. So many stars up there! And so many doubles! I never realized that before. Read it in NightWatch last night, but experienced it tonight. Anyway, the shroud needs a couple of tweaks, but they can wait until the gaffers tape gets here.

 

In all a good 30 minutes outside. I'd love to have stayed out longer, but I hate the cold.

Clear skies!

 

PS: no glasses is the way to go.


Edited by matthannan, 12 February 2018 - 09:54 PM.

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#2667 Stargazer3236

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 10:18 PM

Congrats on second light!

 

I have not had my One Sky out yet, but received it last Thursday. Got my travel bag and light shroud, will be adding a 6x30 Raci finder next, another dovetail on the other side so I can attach it to my Nexstar SE mount for goto viewing. Waiting on my Federal Tax Refund to buy a new camera for wide field imaging. I live up the road from you, by about 50 miles.

 

I don't like that cold at all. Waiting for temps to get to 35+ outside at night, I prefer 40+.


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#2668 MarioJumanji

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 11:14 PM

Snuck out tonight because it was the first night with both clear skies and reasonable temps since the last time I went out.
So, Second Light!

I have a faulty RDF (aims high), but I am not going to bother MSimmons about it. I'll figure something else out.
In fact, it wasn't even on the telescope when I brought it outside. Figured I would just learn how to point and shoot with the 25mm. I think a GLP is out for me. Turns out, there is a small airfield not very far from me. Could be two miles as the crow flies. Probably a bit more, but I don't think I want to chance it.

I managed to find Pleiades this time. Wow! There is a lot more going on there than your bare eyes would have you believe! And it is even more beautiful, as a result.
I also managed to find some part of Orion when I was feeling brave and zooming around with the 2x Barlow and the 10mm installed; looking for bunches of bright objects.
Did I just see a nebula? I need to hit these books I got from the library (Turn Left and NightWatch) to make sure, but I think I just saw my first nebula!
SO much to learn!

Polaris is blocked for me, due to a giant walnut tree in my backyard, so I tried to take a look at the Big Dipper. Unfortunately, the lights from my across the street neighbor's house were bouncing right off the lens, so I couldn't see a darned thing. Thanks, neighbors. What are you doing over there? Landing UFOs?

The Super Simple Tripod worked a treat. I think I need to take the legs down about 2 or 3 inches. It was just a touch too high. Easier to cut them down than to build them up, so no big deal.
I think the plastic posterboard light shroud did its job, too. So many stars up there! And so many doubles! I never realized that before. Read it in NightWatch last night, but experienced it tonight. Anyway, the shroud needs a couple of tweaks, but they can wait until the gaffers tape gets here.

In all a good 30 minutes outside. I'd love to have stayed out longer, but I hate the cold.
Clear skies!

PS: no glasses is the way to go.

The Orion nebula is incredible. If you're not sure where you were looking, it's the middle 'star' of the sword, under the belt. If you can get some darkness, you can see a lot of detail in it. Look at it with the 25mm to get a good view of it, then zoom in on the trapezium with the 10mm.

Edited by MarioJumanji, 12 February 2018 - 11:15 PM.

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#2669 Lazaroff

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 09:42 AM

To mathannan and anyone else who's still having trouble with a red-dot finder that points too high:

 

The staple trick, which I described earlier on this page (post #2663), is a five-minute fix that works perfectly. Some people use two staples. See posts #1171-1172, page 87 for pics.

 

If you secure the staple(s) with black tape the mod will be nearly invisible. I remove the finder when I pack up the scope, and the staple doesn't interfere at all with sliding it back into place.

 

(I think the problem is caused by a minor defect in manufacture of the telescope. The mounting shoe on the scope is tilted slightly upward relative to the scope's optical axis. Lay a ruler across it lengthwise to see the angle it makes with the scope's tube.)



#2670 matthannan

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 12:21 PM

To mathannan and anyone else who's still having trouble with a red-dot finder that points too high:

 

The staple trick, which I described earlier on this page (post #2663), is a five-minute fix that works perfectly. Some people use two staples. See posts #1171-1172, page 87 for pics.

 

If you secure the staple(s) with black tape the mod will be nearly invisible. I remove the finder when I pack up the scope, and the staple doesn't interfere at all with sliding it back into place.

 

(I think the problem is caused by a minor defect in manufacture of the telescope. The mounting shoe on the scope is tilted slightly upward relative to the scope's optical axis. Lay a ruler across it lengthwise to see the angle it makes with the scope's tube.)

Fantastic. I will try that tonight. I wasn't sure if the staples stayed in place or not, so I was thinking about some kind of a more permanent solution. Sounds like tape is the way to go. Thanks!!


Edited by matthannan, 13 February 2018 - 03:20 PM.


#2671 matthannan

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 07:24 PM

The Orion nebula is incredible. If you're not sure where you were looking, it's the middle 'star' of the sword, under the belt. If you can get some darkness, you can see a lot of detail in it. Look at it with the 25mm to get a good view of it, then zoom in on the trapezium with the 10mm.

Looking into this a bit more, I am pretty sure I stumbled my way, at 130x magnification, into the Orion Nebula. I made a mental note of the four bright stars, which I think would be the Trapezium. What is killing me is that all of the images I am seeing online are far better than what the OS provided. As awesome as the OS is, it is no Hubble!

 

There it is! Page 50 of Turn Left. That is exactly it.

Awesome!!!


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#2672 SeaBee1

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 07:34 PM

Matt, just so you are clear, you will not get a visual look through any scope that will match the Hubble. Without going into a long explanation as to why, just know that your eyes with an eyepiece collects and processes photons differently than Hubble does with a camera.

 

Just keep looking up!

 

CB


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#2673 matthannan

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 09:05 PM

Matt, just so you are clear, you will not get a visual look through any scope that will match the Hubble. Without going into a long explanation as to why, just know that your eyes with an eyepiece collects and processes photons differently than Hubble does with a camera.

 

Just keep looking up!

 

CB

Roger that. I understand fully. It is just that if you Google for a picture of the Orion Nebula, what you see in the search results is not exactly what you will see in your scope. I was saying this to point out that it can be difficult for a newbie to find their way around the sky based just on Internet images. 


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#2674 SeaBee1

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 10:19 PM

 

Matt, just so you are clear, you will not get a visual look through any scope that will match the Hubble. Without going into a long explanation as to why, just know that your eyes with an eyepiece collects and processes photons differently than Hubble does with a camera.

 

Just keep looking up!

 

CB

Roger that. I understand fully. It is just that if you Google for a picture of the Orion Nebula, what you see in the search results is not exactly what you will see in your scope. I was saying this to point out that it can be difficult for a newbie to find their way around the sky based just on Internet images. 

 

 

Not just the internet, but old fashioned books as well. It can be a shock and a disappointment to the unwary. Glad you get it, some don't and go on a hunt for larger and larger aperture, only to find that in the end, if you want Hubble images, you need the Hubble...

 

Clear DARK skies!

 

CB


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#2675 MSimmons

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 11:24 PM

Roger that. I understand fully. It is just that if you Google for a picture of the Orion Nebula, what you see in the search results is not exactly what you will see in your scope. I was saying this to point out that it can be difficult for a newbie to find their way around the sky based just on Internet images. 

 

 

Definitely true. And some (unscrupulous, IMHO) manufacturers put Hubble-like images on the boxes their little scopes come in, which is really misleading.

 

But there is help out there. Some amateurs post images processed to look like what you can expect in small-aperture scopes. Some software will also simulate what you should see. That said, I have no idea where to find these resources but they shouldn't be too hard to find.

 

Mike


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